Replied to Digg Shrugg by Alan LevineAlan Levine (CogDogBlog)
Born as the bastard child of Google Reader, Digg’s own spawn came into being June 26, 2013 as a ray of hope for the RSS fanatics, aiming to offer the same feature set as the dead Google parent. Digg Reader lived a placid life, not quite firmly connected with it’s parent’s products (whatever they are) but performed a yeoman’s service for the dwindling few who believed in the choice of news and information sources, rather than sucking up to the hose of some algorithm. But Digg Reader’s health was failing as many noticed the dwindling reliability and upkeep of the mobile app. It’s death was mercifully quick, it did not suffer long, yet left most wondering in its wake why it was even sick.
I totally get your point about feed readers not actually holding our information as such, I think that Inoreader takes this a step further with the ability to subscribe to feeds which can easily be stored in WordPress. Maybe there is a potential of a linksplot?
Replied to @mrkrndvs I've really been interested in the collection/curation I see from you & @chrisaldrich - I'm in the process of figuring out how to build up a WordPress site to serve as the by wiobyrnewiobyrne (Scholar Social)
@mrkrndvs I've really been interested in the collection/curation I see from you & @chrisaldrich - I'm in the process of figuring out how to build up a WordPress site to serve as the "commonplace book" on the WordPress site, keep it simple, and have it pump into my weekly newsletter. Any links/guida...
I agree with @ChrisAldrich about post kind plugins. Although I have more variants than the kinds provided, they offer a really good starting point.

Clint Lalonde Also wrote about the use of MailPoet To curate his newsletter. It doesn’t suit me at this point in time, but might suit you. Also, I think MailChimp allows you to collate via blog posts too? I assume that is what @dajbelshaw is doing with Thought Shrapnel.

Liked How Netflix works: the (hugely simplified) complex stuff that happens every time you hit Play by Mayukh Nair (Medium)
This is what happens when you hit that Play button: Hundreds of microservices, or tiny independent programs, work together to make one large Netflix service. Content legally acquired or licensed is converted into a size that fits your screen, and protected from being copied. Servers across the world make a copy of it and store it so that the closest one to you delivers it at max quality and speed. When you select a show, your Netflix app cherry picks which of these servers will it load the video from. You are now gripped by Frank Underwood’s chilling tactics, given depression by BoJack Horseman’s rollercoaster life, tickled by Dev in Master of None and made phobic to the future of technology by the stories in Black Mirror. And your lifespan decreases as your binge watching turns you into a couch potato.
Watched
In this presentation, Austin Kleon considers the question of “How to keep going” He answers this with ten points:

  1. Everyday is Groundhog Day
  2. Build a ‘bliss station’
  3. Forget the noun, follow the verb
  4. Make gifts
  5. The ordinary + extra attention = extra-ordinary
  6. Art is FOR life
  7. You’re allow to change your mind
  8. When in doubt, tidy up
  9. Demon’s hate fresh air so take a walk
  10. Spend time on something that will outlast you

I find Kleon one of those writers (and artists) who you can come back to again as a point of reflection.

Image via “Happy Little Trees” by nolnet https://flickr.com/photos/nolnet/5589665399 is licensed under CC BY-NC
Quote via Austin Kleon ‘How to Keep Going’
Listened Taking the time to be offline by Dean Pearman from Design and Play
In our first real episode for 2018, we revisit the importance of offline time and switching off. This is always a challenge when work is something you are incredibly passionate about. How do we develop good work habits when the lines are blurred so much? We explore the third space, a concept developed by Adam Fraser designed to help people transfer better between work and space. We once again circle back on time tracking and managing our time. We explore the value of what to measure when tracking time. Steve explains his tracking of interruptions and the use of reticular activation to intentionally manage his focus and habits. We talk about the books we read and those that just couldn’t bring ourselves to read (#blurredlines). This leads to a rich discussion on real evidence of learning and design thinking as a mental model. Student centred learning features as Dean explores his school’s new Inspire Me curriculum and the removal of the curriculum safety net.
Replied to Typing Tips: The How and Why of Teaching Students Keyboarding Skills by Kathleen Morris (Primary Tech)
There are so many great games and online tools designed for younger students. Once students begin recognising the alphabet, I think they can begin learning to type. This can complement your teaching of traditional writing and literacy. Some schools of thought suggest that typing might be the new cursive. So instead of investing time in teaching students how to join their writing in middle primary school, perhaps there could be more of a focus on improving keyboarding skills.
Interesting post Kathleen.

It feels like we spend so much time debating handwriting sometimes that we forget about typing. I really like how you compare the different applications in a concise fashion.

You might be interested in this post from Catherine Gatt, in which she reflects on the development associated with learning to type.

Listened Episode 20, March 22, 2018 from llennon.podbean.com
The Admins are back at it. Discussing new releases, changes, and discoveries in the Admin Console. Oh yeah, almost forgot to mention, special guest is CYRUS MISTRY! (I really didn't come anywhere near close to forgetting that, I just wanted to add a little...
Cyrus Mistry from Google discusses the process for bringing a new Chromebook ‘feature’ to market. He uses the example of the world facing camera. The process begins by identifying what the feature requires and then where it will go. Once developed, the next step is a series of testing. This whole process usually takes a year to achieve.