Listened This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition by Marty McGuire from martymcgui.re
This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition is a weekly audio summary of This Week in the IndieWeb,a digest of activities of the IndieWeb community.
Just as with the Domain of One’s Own, the #IndieWeb is as much a mindset, an approach to a more open and democratic web, as it is about the tools. Marty McGuire’s weekly take on the IndieWeb News is a great way to stay abreast of this evolving space. A regular mix of interviews, events, posts and wiki updates is a great place to capture ideas and be inspired. McGuire also provides captions to support the audio.
Listened If You Don’t Have Anything Nice to Say, SAY IT IN ALL CAPS - This American Life from This American Life
It’s safe to say whatever you want on the Internet; nobody will know it’s you. But that same anonymity makes it possible for people to say all the awful things that make the Internet such an annoying and sometimes frightening place. This week: what happens when the Internet turns on you?
Lindy West also reflected upon this experience and the podcast here.
Listened 047: The Web is Neither Good or Bad…nor is it Neutral. It’s an Amplifier with Jeremy Keith from User Defenders Podcast
Jeremy Keith reveals how the web is neither good or bad, nor neutral, but an amplifier. He inspires us to not let the future be just something that happens to us, but rather something we make with the small things we do today. He encourages us to build software ethically with our users’ psychological vulnerabilities in mind. He motivates us to not build on rented land, but to publish using the superpower of our own URLs. He also shows us how looking to the past is just as important as looking to the future.
Here is a breakdown of the episode:

  • Iron Man Photo Story (4:43)
  • On Net Neutrality (13:31)
  • What’s “Adactio”? (20:44)
  • Is the Internet Good or Evil? (24:41)
  • Hippocratic Oath for Software Designers (35:51)
  • Resilient Web Design (49:06)
  • Why do you Love the Web so Much? (54:26)

The best of the web is people sharing what they know

  • The Power and Generosity of the Community (63:05)
  • What Comes Next? (71:34)
  • Listener Question? (73:44)
  • Last Words to the Builders of the Web (74:18)
Listened CM 097: Sam Walker on Creating Outstanding Teams by Gayle Allen from Curious Minds
Sam Walker lays out his findings in his latest book, The Captain Class: The Hidden Force that Creates the World’s Greatest Teams. Initially, he expected to find a magical combination of factors such as exceptional skill, brilliant coaching and remarkable strategy. Instead, he discovered something completely different: the 16 teams with the longest winning streaks across 37 elite sports succeeded because of a single player — the captain of the team. These captains were not only not the best player, but also possessed all or most of seven characteristics rarely associated with great leaders.
Sam Walker argues that successful ‘captains’ are not the usual. In his research, he identified seven key behaviours:

they are relentless
they are aggressive
they are willing to do thankless jobs
they shy away from the limelight
they excel at quiet communication
they are difficult to manage
they have excellent resilience and emotional control

Moving forward, he suggests dropping your preconceptions about leadership, looking for those who deflect praise onto others and are focused on team goals, even if this is critical of current practices. This has many correlations with the work of Leading Teams.

Listened Post-work: the radical idea of a world without jobs – podcast by Andy Beckett from the Guardian
Work has ruled our lives for centuries, and it does so today more than ever. But a new generation of thinkers insists there is an alternative
This long read provides a dive into the world of work and what it might mean to live in a ‘post-work’ world.

Post-work is about the future, but it is also bursting with the past’s lost possibilities.

Read the text version here.

Listened IRL Podcast Episode 10: Face Value from irlpodcast.org
From Snapchat filters to Apple’s Face ID, biometric technology plays a growing role in our everyday lives. What do we actually give up when we upload our face to these apps? Steven Talley shares his experience as a victim of mistaken identity. Joseph Atick, a forefather of facial recognition technology, reckons with its future. We head to to China, where biometric data is part of buying toilet paper. And artist Adam Harvey investigates how racial bias seeps into big data sets.
In this episode of the IRL Podcast, Veronica Belmont leads a conversation about mistaken identity, the Art and Culture selfie and increase in the collection of biometric data in China.

Glynnis MacNicol questions what we are giving up in using our face to log-in to our phone or sharing online. He suggests that we should become face-less:

Everyone get your faces offline. Yes, I can’t … What evidence is there that this is a good idea? I mean, really? Is there literally any evidence that this is going to benefit us? Let me ask you, why would you post a selfie?

That has me again thinking about the use of such platforms as Facebook and Instagram to share school-based images.

For Adam Harvey, it comes back to race:

I tell people that facial recognition is really racial recognition, plus some additional metadata.

In an article in the New Yorker, Joy Buolamwini suggests that this is a coded gaze:

Just as the male gaze sees the world on its own terms, as a place made for men’s pleasure, the coded gaze sees everything according to the data sets on which its creators trained it.

This is very much a part of the discussion of ethics in the new machine age.

Bookmarked The GIF as an increasingly important visual communication tool (Radio National)
The GIF, this little looped video, is often misunderstood as a component of modern communication.
Antony Funnell leads a discussion into the place of GIFs in modern communication. This includes contributions from:

  • Gretchen McCulloch – Montreal-based Internet linguist – on the role of visual information.
  • David McIntosh – CEO and co-founder, Tenor (formerly Riffsy) – on the possibility of a Gif keyboard

  • Dr Tim Highfield – Research Fellow, Digital Media Research Centre, QUT – on the curtural dimensions.

  • Cheney Brew – Trove Digital Communications Officer, National Library of Australia on the GIF IT UP competition

I have written about GIFs before, even created a collection of GIFs for my colleagues on leaving my old organisation. However, this podcast provides some of the background to them.

Listened Ep. 71 Merrelyn Emery “Having a Role in Your World” from teamhuman.fm
Playing for Team Human today is world renowned social scientist and systems thinker, Merrelyn Emery. Emery, with her partner the late Fred Emery, advanced Open Systems Theory and applied it to manage
Merrelyn Emery discusses systems thinking with Douglas Rushkoff. In particular, she unpacks the difference between managed and self-managed systems, explaining how larger companies can break the heirachical model by spitting the decisions up. As Emery explains:

By working together with collective responsibility, people can regain control over their own affairs, in their own communities and organizations, by cooperating to meet shared goals rather than competing or peeling off as individuals to do ‘their own thing’.

This reminds me in part of heutagogy.

Listened Bleachers - I Miss Those Days from Song Exploder
Bleachers is the moniker of Jack Antonoff, a songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and producer. He won two grammy awards as a member of the band fun., and another for his production work on Taylor Swift’s album 1989. He’s also co­-written songs with St. Vincent, Carly Rae Jepsen, Lorde, Sia, and more. In June 2017, Antonoff released his second album as Bleachers, Gone Now. In this episode, he breaks down a song from that album, called “I Miss Those Days" and traces the process of making it—from the original demo, to a version he discarded, to the final song.