Listened St. Vincent Details ‘Masseduction’ Redux LP ‘MassEducation’ by Kory Grow from Rolling Stone
When Annie Clark was mixing last year’s critically acclaimed Masseduction, she cut another version of the same album that she’s since dubbed MassEducation. The reworked LP, which will come out on October 12th, features only her on vocals and Thomas Bartlett on piano. She described the record in a statement as “two dear friends playing songs together with the kind of secret understanding one can only get through endless nights in New York City.”
I loved MassEduction, but the rawness of just voice and piano in this version of the album takes the music to a whole new level for me.
Listened Ep. 106 Nora Bateson “Warm Data” from teamhuman.fm

Playing for Team Human today is systems thinker, writer, and filmmaker Nora Bateson. Nora will be telling us how to stop looking at things as objects and begin seeing the spaces and connections between

In a discussion with Douglas Rushkoff, Nora Bateson discusses the concept of ‘Warm Data’ and the interconnected nature of everything.

“Warm Data” is information about the interrelationships that integrate elements of a complex system. It has found the qualitative dynamics and offers another dimension of understanding to what is learned through quantitative data, (cold data).(source)

For Bateson, it is the relationships which bring the data alive.

This stems from the notion of ‘warm ideas’, as idea that leads you into another idea of relations. In this circumstance it is about going beyond departments and instead focusing on context.

The underlying premise of the IBI is to address and experiment with how we perceive. Our mandate is to look in other ways so that we might find other species of information and new patterns of connection not visible though current methodologies. We call this information “Warm Data”.(Mission Statement)

I was not exactly sure what this all looks like in practice, but did take away that it was about working together.

Listened CM 115: Steven Johnson on Making Decisions that Matter the Most by Gayle Allen from Curious Minds Podcast

What if you could make better decisions? Even with the biggest, life-altering choices, such as where to live, who to marry, or whether to start a company? Steven Johnson, author of the book, Farsighted: How We Make the Decisions that Matter the Most, thinks we often face decisions like this with little to no training and that we could use more tools in our decision-making toolbox.

I am always captivated by Steven Johnson’s work. In his discussion with Gayle Allen he provides a number of tips and reflections the act of making a decision.
Listened Listening and responding from Radio National
So if I were to give a down and dirty, so to speak, over what an effective listener is, it would be somebody that takes a step back, that allows the other to speak, that gives their full attention, that hears the message with their ears, with their heart, with their mind, with their emotional intelligence, that suspends judgement and makes a connection with the other individual
An interesting conversation on listening, lurking, reflecting and just being there.
Listened Lady Gaga / Bradley Cooper: A Star is Born Soundtrack from Pitchfork
The film’s official soundtrack is similarly old-fashioned in its approach, even as its credits include a host of modern songwriters from the pop, country, and rock spheres. Along with Gaga and Cooper, there’s contributions from Jason Isbell, Willie Nelson’s son Lukas, Mark Ronson, Miike Snow frontman Andrew Wyatt, behind-the-scenes pop wizards Julia Michaels and Justin Tranter, the list goes on. The songs fall into a few distinct silos—blaring blues-rockers, tender acoustic ballads, anthemic torch songs, and robotic electro-pop—and save for a digital flourish or two on the pop songs that make up much of the film’s back half, there’s very little here that would’ve sounded out of place on blockbuster film soundtracks of decades past.
I am really enjoying this album. I really like hearing an artist stretch beyond their usual sound, while Bradley Cooper sounds a little like Chris Cornell without the screaming.
Listened TER #118 – Jane Caro on Education – 02 Sept 2018 from Teachers' Education Review
In this episode, Dan Haesler talks with author and public education advocate Jane Caro, about her life and career that led her to become such an outspoken defender of public schools, and some of her opinions on the state of education today.
Listened Getting serious about drones from Radio National

It is time to put aside the novelty aspect of unmanned aerial vehicles and start designing domestic drones that are fit for purpose. But how do you regulate a technology that has so many different uses and such varying capacities?

Antony Funnell leads a conversation looking into the current state of drones. One of the interesting examples shared came via Jon Schwindt. He spoke about the use of drones to deliver medical supplies in Rwanda. It is interesting to think about technology beginning in places like Africa. Is this because they have lower standards or is it simply the right fit? I am reminded of Bridge International and the their work in Liberia.
Listened Win/Win: Why Billionaire Philanthropists are Bad at School Reform – Have You Heard from haveyouheardblog.com

We uphold through what we passively assent to this world and schools uphold it by what they put on the board and who they raise money from ... We are all in on a world that has entrusted the super-rich to become our saviors.

In the latest episode of Have You Heard, Jennifer and Jack talk to Anand Giridharadas about his best-selling new book, Winners Take All: the Elite Charade of Changing the World. The discuss the place private investment on education today and the win-win culture that it creates. Instead, of the ‘feudal’ relationship at place we need to focus on four key aspects: public, democratic, universal and institutional. The future should not be based on a hedge fund.
Listened Algorithms and data – what does the future hold? Chips with Everything podcast by Jordan Erica Webber from the Guardian

Can the messy and complex world we live in be reduced to algorithms? And should we even try? Mathematician and lecturer Hannah Fry attempts to answer all this and more

In an interview on the Chips with Everything podcast, Hannah Fry discusses her new book Hello World. In it she discusses the rise of algorithms and computational thinking throughout the modern world. Fry paints a picture of where we currently are and possibly going. In doing so she warns:

We all need to be a bit more literate and a lot more sceptical.

It is interesting to listen to this alongside Cathy O’Neill’s Weapons of Math Destruction and
Adam Greenfield’s Radical Technologies.