Listened Late Junction - Thom Yorke’s mixtape - BBC Sounds by an author from BBC
Catch up on your favourite BBC radio show from your favourite DJ right here, whenever you like. Listen without limits with BBC Sounds.
I always love Yorke’s thinking about music. In a short discussion at the start of his set he discusses his love of tape for recording, the place of mathematics within art and different possibilities and potentials out there. It was this last point that really left me thinking. Listening to Autechre or Father John Misty is not about reproducing their sound, but simply being aware of what sounds are in fact possible. This was in part in reference to his work associated with his soundtrack for Suspiria.
Listened Ep. 110 Enspiral: “Better Work Together” – Team Human by an author

Playing for Team Human today: Susan Basterfield and Anthony Cabraal. Susan and Anthony share the open secrets of bottom-up collaboration as we celebrate the publication of Enspiral’s book, Better Work Together. It’s a conversation about the power of working together, building on ideas “good enough to try,” and creating a space where it’s “safe to fail.”
Looking for collaborative and participatory ways to create social change? Enspiral has collected and opened up its learnings for all to replicate.

Douglas Rushkoff talks with Susan Basterfield and Anthony Cabraal about the challenge and experience of working cooperatively. The key to such a change is consciously opting in and taking radical responsibility. This is an interesting listen in regards to entrepreneurship. I am reminded of the work at Templestowe College and wonder if their structure is that of a cooperative?
Listened Reflections on the smart phone by Antony Funnell, Professor Genevieve Bell, Ariel Bogle, Distinguished Professor Larissa Hjorth, Emma Bennison from Radio National
Smart phones have become an essential part of our lives. But are they so familiar, we sometimes underestimate their importance? The role they’ve played in helping to shape our interests and interactions?
Antony Funnell speaks with Professor Genevieve Bell, Ariel Bogle, Distinguished Professor Larissa Hjorth and Emma Bennison about the history and affordances of the smart phone. They discuss the walled garden created by apps, the way devices inform our humanness, the cross-cultural appropriation of new technologies, support for accessibility and the surveillance built in. I have been thinking a lot about smart phones lately, especially while reading James Bridle’s New Dark Age and Adam Greenfield’s Radical Technologies. The conversation that I think is interesting is whether there is a future beyond the templated self produced by a handful of social silos.
Listened Review: Muse Get Lost in the Eighties on ‘Simulation Theory’ by an author from Rolling Stone
There are some pretty creative uses of their electronic obsessions, however, and that’s reliably becoming one of Muse’s more interesting moves. Though maybe too close to at least two different George Michael songs, “Dig Down,” has a very cool, wubbing, minimal feel and a bravado mix of poptronic pulse and theatrical bombast. And despite its completely ridiculous lyrics and Rush “Roll the Bones” rap vocal effects, “Propaganda” is a excellently weird song: think Prince getting a Swizz Beatz makeover with a steel guitar solo. Basically, where Muse, one of our last huge rock bands, is at their best and smartest is when they’re not being a rock band at all.
I love the idea of Muse taking on the eighties, but something just does not seem to click. It is interesting that they engaged with the likes of Timbaland, but musically and thematically it is a little confusing. I think Christopher Weingarten captures this best:

Most of Simulation Theory could be about our surveillance state and/or a relationship. The blurring results in clunkiness.

I am sure that live it would be a stadium spectacular, as it has many of the usual licks and baselines, but as an album it was short of what I hoped for.


On the flipside, I was really intrigued by the ‘alternative reality’ versions of a few of the songs. Along with Snow Patrol, Kimbra and St. Vincent, this seems to be becoming something of a trend? I wonder if this is a part of the move to digital consumption, therefore providing more opportunities for different takes?

Listened S 3 E 5 Games by an author from S 3 E 5 Games

So you're playing a game. You're playing a game when run a business. You're playing a game when you run a project. You're playing a game when you wake up in the morning and turn on the internet. The question we need to ask ourselves is, is this a game worth playing? Am I getting better at this game? Is this game helping the people around me? Am I glad I am playing this game?

Seth Godin discusses the many games that consume our lives. He encourages us to stop and consider all aspects of life, not just the explicit games. Being in the midst of the Spring Racing Carnival in Victoria, this is an interesting topic to consider. This reminds me of a comment from Tom Chatfield on RN Future Tense:

So in the broad sense you could almost go as far as saying things like Twitter or Facebook are a kind of very clever game because people have a profile which they care about, and they are constantly in the business of trying to make numbers go up, trying to get more followers, trying to get more likes, trying to get more tweets or re-tweets. They are comparing themselves to other people. Again, in Twitter there’s a sort of global scoring system where you can see where you are ranked. And there are these very playful dynamics as well whereby you are free to do anything you like within the rules of the game, within the magic circle there on screen. You can switch on, you can switch off, you can like, you can unlike, you can really indulge whimsy. So that’s one thing.

Listened Ep. 109 “A Pirate Bay of Knowledge?” by Jason Schmitt, Douglas Rushkoff from Team Human

Playing for Team Human today: Jason Schmitt. Jason looks at the big business of for-profit academic publishing in his new documentary Paywall:The Business of Scholarship. Should the the world’s research be locked behind closed doors? Jason makes the case for open access on today’s Team Human.

Jason Schmitt and Douglas Rushkoff discuss the way in which knowledge and scholarship has become locked behind paywalls. The irony of this is that so many of the articles and journals published are written by academics who get little gain out of the time and effort they put in. Schmitt and Rushkoff touch on the open-access work of Aaron Swartz and Alexandra Elbakyan. It is an interesting discussion in a world where many are arguing for more research, yet so much of this research is inaccessible. I remember Karl Trsek, my history teacher in high school, telling me that he continued to maintain a subscription with the university library. I did not understand why this was so important, but now more that ever this is the only means of gaining any sort of access.
Listened Thom Yorke: Suspiria (Music for the Luca Guadagnino Film) by an author from Pitchfork
Yorke’s score tackles a broader range of styles and ideas than any of his previous solo work, and all of them shine. There are appropriately cinematic, minor-key passages for piano and strings; great sheets of electronic buzz; gorgeous choral miniatures with a whiff of Arvo Pärt’s arctic grace; brooding, gothic Americana; and striking forays into pure electronic abstraction, the kind of thing you might have found on the German experimental label Mille Plateaux in the late 1990s.
Pitchfork also wrote a review of the title track.

Recorded on what sounds like the type of upright piano you might find in the corner of an empty recreation hall, “Suspirium” drifts along with practically no production, a desolate snapshot of Yorke in his studio, quietly summoning with moody magic.

Listened 2toPonder Episode 20: Digital Mindfulness Redux by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry
In this episode I continie @mrkndvs disucssion of what does digital mindullness mean. In the last step I foucsed too much on unplugging and Aaron cam back and asked what does it mean to be mindful when you stay online. 
Some great points here Greg. I particularly liked your rephrasing of digital mindfulness as ‘being mindful of the digital’. This was epitomised to me on the weekend in a post on mindfulness that seemed to lack any awareness of the underlying data inherent within platform capitalism.

I also agree about the finding the balance between the technology and the human. I have really enjoyed Douglas Rushkoff’s exploration of this area with the Team Human podcast. I look forward to reading the book too when it comes out.

Listened The rapid growth of e-sports by Dr Sarah Jane Kelly, Darren Kwan, Dr Brandon Spradley, Luke Dale, Mark Azzi, Karin Zsivanovits from Radio National's Future Tense

E-sports – competitive video gaming – is set to leave traditional performance sport in its wake. Whether to recognise e-sports as a real sport is not the main issue any more; the main challenge is to create working governance structures.

This is interesting listening after reading Doug Belshaw’s post on the rise of eSports. All this discussion of playing games to crowds reminds me of the movie, The Wizard. It is interesting that it is currently unregulated. It would seem that this will be a factor in its inclusion in such things as the Olympics?