Listened Cory Doctorow, Meet the Writers 123 - Radio from Monocle
The British-Canadian journalist and author – co-founder of β€˜Boing Boing’, one of the most influential blogs in the world – talks about his vision for our digital world.


Cory Doctorow talks about his education, growing up with mainframes, the consumption of news and engaging with others,

Some interesting quotes:

On Succeeding in Technology

If you really want a good job in tech then you should have the good fortune of being born in 1971 … Anyone who is my age who made a living in technology just got lucky by when they were born.

Paying for the Product

They say if you are not paying for that you are the product, what we see in an era of unregulated monopolism is that people who are paying for it are still the product. You buy an iPhone or an Android Phone and it is loaded with survellieance technology … If you are a farmer and you drive your 1/2 million dollar John Deer tracker around your fields, it is gathering telemtery on your fields … Monsanto takes that data and sells it back to you in seed, while John Deer takes that data and sells it to the futures market.

People Are Free, not the Internet

The internet does not want to be free, people do.

Riding the Highs and Lows

It does not matter how delicious the punch is if there is a turd floating in the punch bowl

via Chris Aldrich

Listened Hey! Algorithms, leave them kids alone: Chips with Everything podcast by Jordan Erica Webber from the Guardian
Jordan Erica Webber looks into reports that YouTube Kids might create an algorithm-free platform


This is an interesting discussion of YT Kids and the role of algorithms. This is an issue that came to light through James Bridle’s post last year.

I must admit that I still use the YT Kids app sometimes. For example, the other day my daughter wanted to watch a song from Little Mermaid. I used the app and it was interesting what I found:

A response from the YT Kids algorithm

It made me think about how that result may have been produced. I listened to the song. It was fine. It was basically a song inspired by The Little Mermaid. I just wonder why horror was allowed through.

Listened Why Personal Learning by Stephen Downes from downes.ca
In this presentation I examine the difference between personal and personalized learning, show how this informs the design of the personal learning environment, and draw from that the reasons for preferring personal learning.


Stephen Downes provides an alternative take on ‘personal’ learning. This touches on the work of the Domain of Your Own project, as well as the #IndieWeb movement. Maybe Grsshopper is what Kin Lane meant by ‘peraonal API’.

via Doug Belshaw

Listened Bookclub - BBC Radio 4 from BBC
Led by James Naughtie, readers talk to acclaimed authors about their best-known novels
Here are a collection of quotes I came across in my Evernote as I was cleaning it out from old BBC Bookclub episodes.

Hilary Mantel

History is not something that is behind us, it is something that we move through

History is never cut or dry, because it happened that way, it doesn’t mean it had to happen that way

We have to think of [fiction] not as an addition to history or an alteration of history, we have to think of it as a parallel record, because fiction deals with that which by its nature never comes along to the historical record. The private life, the private thought, the private word, the unexpressed impulse, the thought repressed, the dream, the inner being, the workings of the psyche

Clive James

The problem with anyone who talks well is that they often talk too much

Eventually I achieved sharing as a moral imperative, but I never learnt it

Paul Auster

A book is made by two people – a writer and a reader

Will Self

You don’t really research fiction, except through life

John Banville

I know there are failures on every page and I am tormented by that. That is why I write another book, so that I can get it right.

Listened New insights about what happened at Pompeii from Radio National
How do you correctly interpret a site that was initially unearthed so long ago? Modern archaeology provides new tools to chip away at the secret.


Matt Smith speaks with Dr Estelle Lazer, Dr Eric Poehler, Dr Gillian Shepherd and Dr Steven Ellis about learning with and from Pompeii. With 250 years of archaeological work, we can now gain new insights about Pompeii by investigating the way in which early archeologists collected evidence. Technology is also providing a new way of preserving the past through the creation of a digital map.

Listened Why I’m suing over my dream internship – podcast by Amalia Illgner from the Guardian
... winning not by being better, but by rigging the competition in your favour. Erecting economic barriers to employment via the high cost of taking an internship is just one more way to reserve the highest-status jobs for the elite.
Listened Kate Bush, Radio 4 on Music - BBC Radio 4 from BBC
In November 2005, Kate Bush broke a 12 year silence with the release of her double album 'Aerial', In this programme she gives a very rare interview to John Wilson in a special edition of Front Row, where she talks about why the album took so long to appear and tells some of the stories behind the songs.


Kate Bush reflects on music, the influence of technology and way in which she crafts her work.

I think that it would be a shame that, amoungst all this technology, for us to lose our sense of humanity. Music is suffering greatly from the overuse of computers and taking away the human element, which art is about human expression. I think machines and technologies should be used by people, you should not be a slave to them.

This reminded me of the discussion of Nigel Godrich’s use of tape in the production of music as a part of episode two of the Soundbreaking documentary.

via Austin Kleon

Listened Why Silicon Valley billionaires are prepping for the apocalypse in New Zealand – podcast by Mark O'Connell from the Guardian
How an extreme libertarian tract predicting the collapse of liberal democracies – written by Jacob Rees-Mogg’s father – inspired the likes of Peter Thiel to buy up property across the Pacific


A text version can be found here.

Listened Ep. 79 Suzanne Slomin β€œFeeding A Living Culture” from teamhuman.fm
Playing for Team Human today is Suzanne Slomin, founder of Green Rabbit a small solar powered bakery located in the Mad River Valley of Vermont specializing in naturally leavened breads.Suzanne wi


In the introduction, Douglas Rushkoff reflections on the blockchain. This is in contrast to the usual hype. Rushkoff questions what happens when the incentive of mining bitcoin has gone? We are then back to the traditional banking structure where we are dependent on some sort entity to provide a subscription service.

For the feature, Rushkoff talks with Suzanne Slomin about baking bread. This is an insightful conversation. It reminds me of a similar conversation on the Eat This podcast. One of the aspects that stood out was the Slomin’s discussion of her use of living culture as opposed to industrial yeast. She describes how she has to regularly feed it or else it turns in on itself. This is a fantastic metaphor for change.