Replied to Using the Design Thinking Process to Write a Book (A.J. JULIANI)
Yet, there was something I wanted to do with this book that made it different. During the navigation ideas phase, I wondered what it would be like to give the book away for FREE to teachers and leaders all over. Now, folks would still have to pay for shipping, but with printing costs as low as they are, I wondered how this was possible. I had a number of really bad experiences of sending books out to teachers free. The organization and fulfillment of this process were tough for all involved.
Thanks for sharing the process AJ.

I’ve always wondered about self-publishing, but always from a digital perspective, using Gumroad or some other platform. I had never thought of physically publishing something and giving it away. I obviously need to explore this in more detail.

Syndicated at Read Write Collect

Bookmarked Problem Finding by Tom Barrett (The Curious Creative)
I have adapted some of the Design Kit steps below and have a HMW Framing template
Based on the methods of Design Kit, Tom Barrett breaks the process of framing a problem into eight steps:

  1. Describe the problem or issue
  2. List the stakeholders
  3. Re-frame the issue as a How Might We statement
  4. Describe the impact you are attempting to have.
  5. Why needs your help the most?
  6. What are some possible solutions to your problem?
  7. Describe the context and constraints you have to your future ideas.
  8. Re-write a different version of your original HMW statement.

Here is an image I made based on the How Might We format:

I remember when I ran Genius Hour, I used HMW, however I struggled with supporting students in developing these. I think that Barrett’s steps helps with that.

Bookmarked What If? And What’s Wrong? – Sherri Spelic – Medium by Sherri Spelic (Medium)
I wonder about how we educate our students to see the design in the systems they are witnessing, experiencing, and impacted by. Seeing patterns of design requires more than 6 steps in a prescribed cycle, while looking into the past as well as the future. Design Thinking aligns well a certain kind of neoliberal enthusiasm for entrepreneurship and start-up culture. I question how well it lends itself to addressing social dilemmas fueled by historic inequality and stratification.
Sherri Spelic reflects on design thinking wonder if maybe the empahisis on what if and entrepreneurship would be better focused on what’s wrong and going from there. Definitely some food for thought.