Bookmarked The Dark Arts of Our Agents of Change by Bruce Dixon (Modern Learners)
When we talk about school change, we usually refer to changeleaders, but by far the largest number of change influencers are the global tribe of curious, somewhat subversive teachers who are committed to school being a better place for their students. They are our agents of change.
Bruce Dixon reflects on the role of teachers as change agents. He identifies four tactics used:

  • Focus on learning, not on change.
  • Focus on the ‘why’ not the ‘how.’
  • See change as a journey, not a blueprint.
  • Share ideas by taking down walls not building fences.
  • Know the importance of  ‘winning the war,’ not fighting battles.

This reminds me in part of Will Richardson’s keynote for TL21C a few years ago. There Will argued for 10% at a time.

Liked Avoid Binary Thinking. Go To The Grey. by Chris Wejr (chriswejr.com)
it is EASY to tweet a dichotomous statement in a succinct manner that gets people’s attention and gets 100s of retweets; but we often lose out on the grey and miss out on the opportunity to engage.  If we do feel the need to make a polarizing statement, we need to be willing to engage when someone challenges us.  Keep the social in social media; respond when we are respectfully challenged so the conversation can move deeper and move to the heart of the statement. We need to continually reflect, be willing to be challenged and open to others’ ideas and opinions.
Read Surviving and Thriving in a VUCA World: In Consideration of Education in the Exponential Age (DCulberhouse)
David Culberhouse provides a succinct 'call to action' for leadership in the modern world.
David Culberhouse provides a succinct ‘call to action’ for the modern world.
Replied Education and the Fourth Industrial Revolution – Learning {Re}imagined – Medium by Graham Brown-Martin (Medium)
We are on the precipice of what the World Economic Forum calls the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Artificial intelligence. Automation. Ubiquitous, mobile supercomputing. Intelligent robots. Self…
Graham, i understand that we are in a time of rapid change, but I am not sure how many times I can hear the case for new jobs? My concern is that new jobs implies that there are jobs today or in the past that have not changed, is that really true?

Take education, it can be so easy to make the case that education has not changed for X amount of years, but what does that actually mean? I believe that a teaches job changes every year on a number of levels — policy, classroom, values etc. To say that things do not change dumbs things down to some meaningless context. This is one of the problems with Hattie’s ignorance of outside influences (although this seems to have been covered by the new approaches to Visible Wellbeing and Visible Parenting). I would argue that if Papert were writing, thinking and educating today then his thinking might be different too? Do you agree? Teaching changes.

Let’s take this from a different perspective, say music. I remember watching Synth Britannia, a documentary following a generation of post-punk musicians who took the synthesizer from the experimental fringes to the centre of the pop stage. One of the things that stood out was the influence of technology (synthesizers) on the sound. It can be easy to listen to some of the music now and cringe at the lack of texture of these early synthesisers, but these artists were taking the tool to its extreme. However, this movement was as much a response to politics, to society, as it was to the tool. To do the supposed ‘same’ today would not be the same in my view. Even applying constraints to replicate the recording environment, this is always a choice which you can always escape. It was not back then. However, people still record, create, produce, play music. Has the job changed? What does it actually mean to be a musician or a producer?

Maybe I have missed something? Maybe I don’t get it. I am happy for a different perspective, but I have stopped worrying about jobs and titles, because I have always found them misleading.