Replied to My Instagram Problem (bavatuesdays)
I never planned to get on Instagram, and I was even less inclined to enjoy it. But 616 posts and 18 months later I’m realizing I am deeper in then I ever intended. I tell myself I can quit anytime, but now that Twitter holds little joy for me and Mastodon feels like a temporary rebound relationship, Instagram has quietly become my go to.
It is interesting having gone somewhat quiet on social media. I think what you highlight in this post is the power and presence of a personal community in driving the connections. I am finding that although I may have certain values if the consensus says something different then it does it really matter.

At work, I refused to share my contacts with WhatsUp (and Facebook Inc) and the answer has been that I am excluded from certain conversations. In this circumstance I have lost out?

I like your point about transferability and think that maybe as you point out that this maybe what matters most. This then allows for such projects as Manton Reece’s transfer of Instagram to Micro.blog or Jonathan LaCour’s move to transfer Facebook content using Micropub. A part of me wonders if I retired my Known instance to early?

Watched Sydney's New Year's Eve 2018
The Night is Yours concert included performances from Tim Minchin, Christine Anu, Ross Wilson, Ben Folds, Daryl Braithwaite, Casey Donovan, Isabella Manfredi of The Preatures, Client Liaison, Baker Boy, Kaiit, G Flip and Kimbra. What was really interesting was to hear artists cover the classics.

This is one of the reasons why the funding of the ABC is so important, with the only ad of mention being the spoof around Hottest One Hundred voting:

https://youtu.be/WCA87UHqd1c

Liked HEWN, No. 298 (Hack Education Weekly Newsletter)
Technologists suck at predicting the future. They suck because they don’t understand the past; they’re blind to much of the present. They’re terrible at predicting the future because they fail to grasp the systems and practices surrounding their products, firm in their faith instead that their own genius (and their investors’ continued support) will be enough to muddle forward.
Replied to Something Weird is Happening on Twitter Right Now by Bill Ferriter (Tempered Radical)
What if instead of using social spaces to simply share content, we made a New Year’s Resolution to engage in more conversations with one another? What if we made a commitment to ask more provocative questions or to play the Devil’s Advocate more often?
Even better Bill is if we had such conversations from the comfort of our own backyard using bridgy and webmenbtions, rather than someone else’s playground?
Replied to Refback from IndieWeb Chat by chrisaldrich (BoffoSocko)
It took me a moment to realize what it was exactly since I hadn't yet added a field to indicate it, but since the IndieWeb chat doesn't send webmentions by itself, I'm glad I support refbacks to be aware of comments on my posts. The avatar didn't come through quite like it should, but it's nice to be able to treat refbacks like any other type of mention. Thanks David Shanske for the Refbacks plugin. Thanks Tantek for what I think is my first incoming "mention" from chat. The chat has some reasonable microformats markup, so I suppose the parser could do a more solid job, but this is a pretty great start. Sadly, Refback isn't as real-time as Webmention, but it's better than nothing. I suppose we could all be posting chats on our own sites and syndicating into places like IRC to own our two directional conversations, but until I get around to the other half... (or at least for WordPress, I recall having gotten syndication to IRC for WithKnown working a while back via plugin.)
This all sounds interesting, I am just a bit confused how it actually works. I activated David Shanske’s plugin on both my sites. I now seem to be getting a duplication of my webmentions?

I actually wonder about my pingbacks as well and think they might all just be getting straight to spam as I include so many links in my posts. Is there a way of testing that I am missing?

Bookmarked Rhizomatic Learning – a somewhat curious introduction by dave dave
I apologize for leaving you without a definition or a clear theory of rhizomatic learning, however useful these things could be. Theories, like definitions, help create a shared common language. As we reify language into chunks it creates a shorthand that allows us to communicate faster and more effectively. It also means that we are less likely to misunderstand each other as we have a shared ‘meaning’ for the words that we are using. I am not able to provide this certainty. But with this loss of certainty of meaning there is freedom. Feel free to take this into your own hands and draw the conclusions that work for you.
Thank you Dave for this curious introduction. There is something about definitions that promises too much and maybe delivers too little? A while back I went through my contributions to #Rhizo14 and I kind of cringe at some of my comments. However, a part of me thinks that maybe this misses the point, that rhizomatic learning is a verb, rather than a noun?

I was intrigued by your reference to the impact and influence of technology on learning. Here I am reminded of Doug Belshaw’s work in regards to digital literacies. Even before ‘digital’ is added to the equation technology has had a part to play.

Before books went digital, they were created either by using a pen or by using a printing press. These tools are technologies. Literacy, therefore, is inextricably linked with technology even before we get to ‘digital’ literacies.

I am also taken by the subjective nature of your account. This reminds me of Ian Guest’s account of ‘nudges’ that led to his research.

Personally, my own learning has led me assemblages. See for example Ben Williamson’s work with Class Dojo. I wonder about this as an approach and how it might differ from rhizomatic learning?

Also on: Read Write Collect

Replied to What does it take to be the ‘best and brightest’? by Gill Light
So when you see another media report or education ‘expert’ discussing how important it is that we recruit our ‘best and brightest’ to teaching, consider what attributes being the ‘best and brightest’ might entail. Look beyond their ATAR score to the combination of academic strengths and personal qualities that are both vital in developing teachers that inspire, motivate and educate students.
Well put Gill. What I feel is often missed is that it takes a village to raise a child and a teacher. For all the talk of coaching in the last few years we seem to have overlooked the development of people to instead focus on some odd measurement of success.
Replied to Good Technology by Ryan BarrettRyan Barrett
https://snarfed.org/electric_toothbrush.png https://snarfed.org/electric_toothbrush.png My electric toothbrush is good technology. It has one button. The button turns it on. It vibrates for 30 seconds, buzzes, then repeats three more times. It has no other controls. It works one way: the standard, A...
I am wondering if there is a means of making ‘bad’ technology good or if once bad then always bad?
Replied to 👓 A Reading Plan for 2019 | Rhoneisms by Author Chris AldrichAuthor Chris Aldrich
Read A Reading Plan for 2019 by Patrick Rhone (patrickrhone.net) Last year, I publicized my reading plan for the year. Overall, I’m very happy with the number of books I managed to read (20) and the quality of what I read. There are some aspects of the plan I wish I’d been better at but that’s...
I consider reading lists the same way I think about MOOCs. If I do not finish them then it does not matter too much.

I like your point about books too. As I reflect on my lack of long form reading this year I am reminded by Pocket that I have read what would be quite a few books worth of posts and articles:

I too have recorded much of this too 🙂