Liked Can we have an #IndieWeb webmentions credentialing system? #OpenBadges by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
Over the past few weeks I have discussed this in the #IndieWeb channels with Aaron Parecki and Tantek Çelik if we could use webmentions as a credentialing tool. When you think about it an #openbadges boils down to two permalinks: the task, with criteria and evidence; and the learner artifact with evidence of learning.
I think that this is an interesting idea Greg. I am interested in the idea that if your evidence associated with the badge in question changes, you can simply send a new webmention. Also, in reverse I wonder if webmentions can be used as a may of managing badges that have an expiry date?
Bookmarked The mysterious heart of the Roland TR-808 drum machine (secretlifeofsynthesizers.com)
It is not really possible (at least thus far) to build an analogue copy of a Roland TR-808 without these specific transistors. Some clones have been released and some people have even attempted to build a DIY version using standard 2SC828’s and they discovered that it sounds very wrong. That’s because there is no transistor or zener diode on the planet that has the exact noise spectral profile and output level of the 2SC828-RNZ transistors from the specific 1970’s batch that was used in the production of the TR-808. If the transistor fails in a TR-808 it must only be replaced with a transistor from that original batch or it will no longer sound like a healthy TR-808. When Roland ran out of them they had to discontinue production of the instrument because the noise characteristic of these transitors is crucial to the all important snare and hand clap sounds and that white noise is also then filtered into pink noise for other sounds in the instrument. If you put a standard 2SC828-R into a TR-808 in place of the noise selected part the sound completely changes. As mentioned earlier in the article these transistors are in fact not technically speaking 2SC828’s, if they were they would not have been rejected so putting a 2SC828 in place of Q35 is futile, it’s the wrong part. Fortunately the transistor is not prone to failing so if you own an original 808 then it’s not something you should worry about.
This post on the history of the 2SC828-R transistor central to the Roland TR-808’s sound reminds me of Steven Johnson’s podcast that explored stretching instruments to breaking point. I am intrigued at the idea that to get the sound, Roland sort transistors that were deemed to be ‘out of specification’.
Listened Mentat Mix 1 from SoundCloud

Kidnap - Aurora KIKDRM - Little Helper 311-1 Cari Golden & Dance Spirit - Wash Me Clean (Dance Spirit's Hyperspace Dub) Kölsch - In Bottles Moon Boots - First Landing Yotto - Chemicals (Mentat's Way Out West Edit) AEONIX - A Star Is Born (Clint Stewart Remix) Guy J - Airborne Nick Warren & Tripswitch - Voight Kampff Max Cooper - Resynthesis Dino Lenny & Artbat - Sand In Your Shoes Arthr - Balloons (Mentat Mix) Alex Metric & Ten Ven - Otic Sonin feat. Swedish Red Elephant - All Of My Teenage Crimes

Replied to a post by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
No #IndieWeb WordPress work for me on Day 11. Classes start today. I will tack another day on the end. Yesterday I did get to play with a lot of the post-kind/bridgy/Twitter functionality.
I have been following with interest your questions and queries in the <a https://chat.indieweb.org/wordpress/2018-05-23#bottom” rel=”noopener” target=”_blank”>IndieWeb chat, especially in regards to WordPress. I thought it might be useful to document my workflow associated with Read Write Collect for you:

1. Start with a bookmarklet (desktop) or url forwarder (mobile) to begin the process.

2. Adjust the Post Kind response properties. This might include adding missing information and a quote. Lately – inspired by Chris Aldrich’s posts – I have taken to using HTML to add media or multiple paragraphs into the ‘quote’ box.

3. Copy the title from the response properties to the post title and slug. I also add an emoji to the title associated with the post kind. I used to just add the title, but had issues with the emoji being added to the permalink, so short of developing a theme-based solution that strips any emoji from the permalink, I have taken to manually creating the link.

4. Add content to the post, whether it be a reflection or further summary.

5. Add categories (‘contributions’, ‘creations’ or ‘responses’), tags (usually at least three) and feature images (where applicable)

6. Choose where to POSSE: G+ (Jetpack), Mastadon (Mastadon Autopost) and Twitter, Flickr and Diigo (SNAP). I tried Bridgy a while ago, but it never seemed to work. I probably should return to it, but like the flexibility to adjust posts using SNAP. I really wish that there was only one spot for all of them, but live with it for now.

7. If I manually POSSE (usually when replying to other posts), I return and add these to the syndication links.

I am sure I have missed aspects, but hopefully it helps.

Liked Creativity in the classroom (C2 Melbourne)
Organising a timetable that functions efficiently and also embraces Asimov’s conditions, providing the appropriate time and pace for our students to be deeply creative is a complex issue. It will be one of the biggest hurdles for our schools to overcome and is a vital component of contemporary learning design. Changing the way we organise time might just be the key to unlocking the ideal conditions for creativity in schools.
Bookmarked It’s time to be honest with parents about NAPLAN: your child’s report is misleading, here’s how by By Nicole Mockler (EduResearch Matters)

At the national level, however, the story is different. What NAPLAN is good for, and indeed what it was originally designed for, is to provide a national snapshot of student ability, and conducting comparisons between different groups (for example, students with a language background other than English and students from English-speaking backgrounds) on a national level.

This is important data to have. It tells us where support and resources are needed in particular. But we could collect the data we need this by using a rigorous sampling method, where a smaller number of children are tested (a sample) rather than having every student in every school sit tests every few years. This a move that would be a lot more cost effective, both financially and in terms of other costs to our education system.

Nicole Mockler summarises Margaret Wu’s work.around the limitations to NAPLAN in regards to statistical testing. Moving forward, Mockler suggests that NAPLAN should become a sample based test (like PISA) and is better suited as a tool for system wide analysis. To me, there is a strange balance where on the one hand many agree that NAPLAN is flawed, yet again and again we return to it as a source of ‘truth’.
Liked Human Existence is Difficult. Existentialism and Phenomenology. by jennymackness (Jenny Connected)
The existentialists lived in times of extreme ideology and extreme suffering, and they became engaged with events in the world whether they wanted to or not – and usually they did. The story of existentialism is therefore a political and a historical one: to some extent, it is the story of a whole European century.
Bookmarked What We Talk About When We Talk About Digital Capabilities: Keynote for #udigcap | Donna Lanclos–The Anthropologist in the Stacks (donnalanclos.com)

The history of Anthropology tells us that categorizing people is lesser than understanding them. Colonial practices were all about the describing and categorizing, and ultimately, controlling and exploiting. It was in service of empire, and anthropology facilitated that work.

It shouldn’t any more, and it doesn’t have to now.

You don’t need to compile a typology of students or staff. You need to engage with them.

In a keynote at the UCISA Digital Capabilities event at Warwick University, Donna Lanclos unpacks the effect of analytics and the problems of profiling when trying to identify improvements. A skills approach is an issue when decisions get made on your behalf based on the results of a pre-conceived checklist:

I want to draw a line from quiz-type testing that offers people an opportunity to profile themselves and the problems inherent in reducing knowledge work to a list of skills. And I also want to draw attention to the risks to which we expose our students and staff, if we use these “profiles” to predict, limit, or otherwise determine what might be possible for them in the future.

Lanclos suggests that we need to go beyond the inherent judgments of contained within metaphors and deficit models, and instead start with context:

We need to start with people’s practices, and recognize their practice as as effective for them in certain contexts.

And then ask them questions. Ask them what they want to do. Don’t give them categories, labels are barriers. Who they are isn’t what they can do.

Please, let’s not profile people.

When you are asking your students and staff questions, perhaps it should not be in a survey. When you are trying to figure out how to help people, why not assume that the resources you provide should be seen as available to all, not just the ones with “identifiable need?”

The reason deficit models persist is not a pedagogical one, it’s a political one.

She closes with the remark:

When we ask students questions, it shouldn’t be in a survey.

This reminds me of coaching the fluidity of the conversation. This also touches on my concern with emotional intelligences as a conversational tool.

There is also a recording of this presentation: