Bookmarked How Google and Amazon Got So Big Without Being Regulated by an author (WIRED)
Internet companies used to grow big and die—fast. But now a few of them are huge and entrenched, because regulators didn't foresee their dominance.
In this extract from The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age (Columbia Global Reports), Tim Wu explains how today’s monopolies were able to avoid regulation. He give the particular example of Facebook and Instagram:

When a dominant firm buys its a nascent challenger, alarm bells are supposed to ring. Yet both American and European regulators found themselves unable to find anything wrong with the takeover. The American analysis remains secret, but we have the United Kingdom’s report. Its analysis, such as it was, went as follows: Facebook did not have an important photo-taking app, meaning that Facebook was not competing with Instagram for consumers. Instagram did not have advertising revenue, so it did not compete with Facebook either. Hence, the report was able to reach the extraordinary conclusion that Facebook and Instagram were not competitors.

Liked Companies keep losing your data because it doesn't cost them anything by an author (Array)
If companies were paying out damages commensurate with the social costs their data recklessness imposes on the rest of us, it would have a very clarifying effect on their behavior -- insurers would get involved, refusing to write E&O policies for board members without massive premium hikes, etc. A little would go a long way, here.
Bookmarked How TripAdvisor changed travel by an author (the Guardian)
The long read: The world’s biggest travel site has turned the industry upside down – but now it is struggling to deal with the same kinds of problems that are vexing other tech giants like Facebook, Google and Twitter
I recently recieved an email from Trip Advisor informing me of a ‘big announcement’:

Imagine if everything you love about TripAdvisor was personalized around the friends and travel experts you follow, giving you an easy way to plan and make the most of every trip.

It was interesting thinking about this after reading the long read from Linda Kinstler discussing the rise of the platform. I wonder if it would have been better worked as:

Imagine if you provided TripAdvisor with a list of all your friends and those who you deem as ‘experts’ so that we can then use the profile to better target you with advertising on the web

Replied to |k| clippings: 2018-11-11 — 11/11 at 100 by an author (Katexic Clippings)
Abandoned? Post-apocalyptic? Or not…the Chongqing Metro Station in the Middle of Nowhere.
When I saw the image of subway entry seemingly in the middle of nowhere I thought it must be some sort of joke. However, I soon uncovered a different world. One involving rapid development:

Development of transport in China

The speed at which all this is happening in China makes me wonder why we speak about ten year plans in Melbourne, Australia.

In part this scenario of a station in a field reminds me of the discussion of the development of infrastructure before people in Stockholm:

In contrast, places like Vällingby, a Swedish suburb outside Stockholm built in the 1950s, were sited around a new Metro station. Building rail infrastructure through built-up areas is extremely expensive, but building it through farmland, before new neighborhoods are built, is comparatively cheap.