Checked into Arthur Streeton: The art of war
During my time in Canberra, I visited the National Gallery of Australia. Away without the children, I decided to use the opportunity to explore. I part I was interested in seeing Blue Poles:

NGA – Blue Poles by Jackson Pollock

I was pleasantly surprised to find an Arthur Streeton exhibition focusing on the First World War:

Bringing together key works from collections around Australia and overseas, an important survey exhibition of Arthur Streeton’s war art will open at the NGA in December. Streeton’s contribution to the Australian war effort was significant. He served with the Royal Army Medical Corps at the Third London General Hospital in Wandsworth from 1915 to 1917 before leaving for the Western Front as an official war artist in May 1918.

His wartime output includes images of war machinery stranded in the landscape and scenes of operations headquarters, dressing stations and field hospitals. Streeton visited regions in France where the Australian army had been successful against the enemy, including Poulainville, Péronne and Mont St Quentin, overlooking the Somme. The NGA has recently acquired a deftly painted watercolour of this strategically significant area, presented as a gift to Sir John Monash, one of the war’s outstanding commanders.

I have read poems and diaries, as well as listened to Dan Carlin’s five part series, Blueprint for Armageddon, the thing that stood out with Streeton’s paintings was the stories that they told. We are given such a visual impact of conflicts like Syria. However, back then this was left to artists.

French siege gun by Arthur Streeton

Interestingly, the Australia War Memorial has also improved on its depiction of war, creating models.

It can sometimes be hard to see the possibility of blogging and the web. For me it is about continually joining the dots and making the connections. As Amy Burvall highlights,

In order to connect dots, one must first have the dots

That is the power of Webmentions. My little callout to say, “Hey, interesting idea(s)”. Sharing is where it starts.

This is an activity from Amy Burvall’s session on critical creativity at EdTechTeam Canberra.

Use the random coloured shapes to depict or teach something about … your philosophy of learning and teaching

Metaphorical thinking with Amy Burvall

My reasoning: We learn together. Intertwined. We are different and sometimes we need to bend and be flexible.

Checked into EdTechTeam Canberra Summit - 16 & 17 April, 2018

Ongoing Reporting with GSuite

Session Description

It can be easy to look at an application and provide one answer, the problem with this is that it does not cover all contexts. This presentation will explore some of the possibilities of GSuite to support ongoing reporting and assessment.

Slides

Click here for a copy of the slides.

Resources


Visual Graphics with Google (Demo Slam)

Summary

With the rise of digital texts, it is easy to save quotes these days. The challenge though is do something with them. Using Slides, it is easy to combine text and images in order to develop deeper understanding.

Quote from Rushton Hurley’s keynote at EdTechTeam Canberra 2018

Resources

Replied to The Last and Final Days of Report Cards - Looking Up (Looking Up)
“Video killed the radio star” but what will kill report cards? This is what you’ll see after a short ride into the future in the “Educational Delorean”: Teachers and students use personal digital devices in the classroom. When learning happens it’s recorded on the device. This could be video (student does something), audio (student explains something), pictures, digital documents or written observations. Teachers and students tag the learning with the relevant expectations, add comments and save it on the server. The student receives feedback from the teacher and others, reflects and reviews. When learning is ready to ‘publish’ it’s evaluated and added to the student’s portfolio. The student’s digital portfolio is shared with parents and anyone else the student chooses. Automatic notifications are sent whenever something is added or parents can subscribe to a periodic digest. Parents or others add comments, ask questions, or just click “Like”. When the reporting period ends the student and teacher select the best work for sharing, write reflections and curate the work. Parents add comments. Growth is easily seen because previous work is already in the portfolio.
With various changes in my position, my attention has turned to students reporting. This sent me back into my social bookmarking and I came across your post again Andrew.

Do you think that the conversation has moved much? I have written about ongoing report, however I worry about the schools that do both and the burnout that this may cause.

Liked IndieWeb Journalism in the Wild by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
This is a generally brilliant set up for any researcher, professor, journalist, or other stripe of writer for providing online content, particularly when they may be writing for a multitude of outlets.
Bookmarked I Read One Book 100 Times Over 10 Years… Here Are 100 Life-Changing Lessons I Learned by Ryan Holiday (Medium)
All the things that people do hallucinogens to explore, you can also do while sober as a judge. It just takes work.
Ryan Holiday reflects on the impact of Marcus Aurelius’ Mediation in light of his new book, The Daily Stoic. One of the interesting points Holiday discusses is the influence of translation:

All we have now are translations of translations — no original writing from his hand survives. It all could have been arranged in an entirely different format originally (Did all the books have titles originally — as the first two do? Are those titles made up? Were they all numbered originally? Or were even the breaks between thoughts added in by a later translator?)

This comes back to the work of Walter Benjamin and the Task of the Translator.

Another idea that he discusses is the ability to explore a side of life that many assume is only possible through the use of drugs. He explains that this just takes effort. This reminds me of Jack Antonoff’s avoidance of drugs:

Drugs spin certain wheels in your head that are already spinning