Replied to The Last and Final Days of Report Cards - Looking Up (Looking Up)
“Video killed the radio star” but what will kill report cards? This is what you’ll see after a short ride into the future in the “Educational Delorean”: Teachers and students use personal digital devices in the classroom. When learning happens it’s recorded on the device. This could be video (student does something), audio (student explains something), pictures, digital documents or written observations. Teachers and students tag the learning with the relevant expectations, add comments and save it on the server. The student receives feedback from the teacher and others, reflects and reviews. When learning is ready to ‘publish’ it’s evaluated and added to the student’s portfolio. The student’s digital portfolio is shared with parents and anyone else the student chooses. Automatic notifications are sent whenever something is added or parents can subscribe to a periodic digest. Parents or others add comments, ask questions, or just click “Like”. When the reporting period ends the student and teacher select the best work for sharing, write reflections and curate the work. Parents add comments. Growth is easily seen because previous work is already in the portfolio.
With various changes in my position, my attention has turned to students reporting. This sent me back into my social bookmarking and I came across your post again Andrew.

Do you think that the conversation has moved much? I have written about ongoing report, however I worry about the schools that do both and the burnout that this may cause.

Replied to Using the Design Thinking Process to Write a Book (A.J. JULIANI)
Yet, there was something I wanted to do with this book that made it different. During the navigation ideas phase, I wondered what it would be like to give the book away for FREE to teachers and leaders all over. Now, folks would still have to pay for shipping, but with printing costs as low as they are, I wondered how this was possible. I had a number of really bad experiences of sending books out to teachers free. The organization and fulfillment of this process were tough for all involved.
Thanks for sharing the process AJ.

I’ve always wondered about self-publishing, but always from a digital perspective, using Gumroad or some other platform. I had never thought of physically publishing something and giving it away. I obviously need to explore this in more detail.

Syndicated at Read Write Collect

Replied to Craig Mod’s subtle redesign of the hardware Kindle (Doug Belshaw's Thought Shrapnel)
This is user interface design, or UI design for short. It’s important stuff, for as Steve Jobs famously said: “Everything in this world… was created by people no smarter than you” — and that’s particularly true in tech.
I must admit, I am new to the whole design world. Even though it drives me crazy at times – often because I have little control or influence over it – it is one of the things that I have enjoyed about my current work. Thinking deeply about users and how to streamline various processes has been really interesting.
Replied to Podcast #39 – Using Adaptive Change Methods to Revolutionize Education (Modern Learners)
Do you know the difference between technical change and adaptive change? Most change in schools involves technical change, like “dressing up” the current situation, but not really addressing the underlying issues. Adaptive change, as defined by Harvard’s Ron Heifetz, is changing culture, worldview, and self-worth. These are the changes that are the hardest to make and require a re-imagination of our culture and our basic roles. The message is that we need to stop “playing around the edges” and make changes that really get to the core.


Another interesting listen, with so much to reflect upon.

One thing that stood out though was Will Richardson’s reference to “a post shared on LinkedIn and Facebook.” I wonder if this is the ‘Modern’ world, one ruled by platform capitalism? If:

We need to stop “playing around the edges” and make changes that really get to the core

then I wonder if this is really the core?

I understand our focus should be about ‘learning’, but if there is anything to come out of the recent Cambridge Analytica revelations, then it is surely that we need a better model moving forward.

The future may not involve everyone to #DeleteFacebook, but I would hope that those leading technological change would lead the way? I have the same concern about Anil Dash writing about the open web in a post on Medium. For me, the future is the IndieWeb, for others it is a Domain of One’s Own. I think that both of these discussions touch upon the idea of a canonical URL.

Replied to Assessment in the digital world….with a pencil by Gill (a macgirl in a pc world)
My current setup for my reading conference notes looks like this – a summary page at the start with hyperlinks to individual pages for each of the student records. The different colours on dates are for the fact that I share my grade with another teacher so this solution allows us both to take notes and know where the other teacher is up to.
When Reading Conferences rolled out across the WMR a few years ago, I pushed for doing conferences online. Initially this was via Google Docs and then Word documents on Dropbox.

In a Secondary environment, this allowed access to multiple stakeholders, both teachers and students. In hindsight, it did not work. Not only did students feel that reading was done to them, but it was also left to the English teachers. I reflected about it here.

When I moved down to Primary, I discovered the limits of capturing things like running records digitally. I can really see the possibilities of the pen in supporting this.

How do you see this continuing to evolve? Are students actively involved?

Replied to Stocking Stuffers (Check This Out)
In this special holiday episode we talk all about toys, tech and gifts for the holiday and the return of Tony Vincent.
My vote for the Christmas tracks is with Sia’s album Everyday is Christmas. I found it a really interesting album. Unlike the usual Christmas cover album, Sia has written an original album. It is sometimes flawed, but it certainly wasn’t safe.
Replied to Time to get back into this blogging thing (My Thoughts...)
I realised the other day that I haven’t blogged for some time and started to reflect on why this journey of sharing my learning and my thoughts began. A number of years back I encountered som…
Great to have you back in the blogosphere Donelle. Not sure we ever stop learning about this blogging thing. Leaving the classroom has been interesting in regards to writing and reflecting. However, I always love learning so there is always something.
Replied to WordPress >> Facebook by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
I’m not sure why it didn’t exist before, but given the events of the past month I’m utterly shocked that neither WordPress, Automattic, nor the community have built an importer to allow people to easily put their Facebook data export into a WordPress website.
I have been wondering the same thing lately. Other than Jonathon Lacour’s work, I have not found many examples.
Replied to 👓 Site Building with WordPress and Elementor | Throw Out The Manual by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
I am curious how some of these site builders will do with the upcoming release of Gutenberg, however.
Chris, I had the same thought while reading Tim’s post. It will be interesting to see the impact of Gutenberg.
Replied to Why teachers are turning to Twitter by Brendon Hyndman (The Conversation)
Rather than a one-off professional learning event (such as a conference), Twitter provides a low-cost, easy to access platform. It requires little effort beyond 280 character posts or photos to connect with a range of education professionals, leaders and organisations.
I am a massive advocate of open education. I feel the possibility of a wider audience has taken my learning to a new level. Reading this post, I just feel that there is a massive question not considered.

If you interviewed my last year, would I provide the same response as I do now?

My experience of Twitter has waned of late. I still share there. I still engage with people. However, I have moved my learning to my own space. I think that this is important.

As with all technology, Twitter is ever evolving. The most recent news has been the depreciation of their API that allows for the development of external applications. Each of these changes has a consequence.

The other concern I have is which teachers are turning to Twitter? Chris Wejr questions whether every teacher is able to share who they are online?. Maha Bali also captures this in regards to open education:

what kind of privileges do we have that give us the power to have a space there – things like the English language, having the capacity for a good bandwidth on in the internet to do something like virtually connecting, having TIME to spare and being financially comfortable, being naturally willing to expose yourself and make yourself vulnerable – you have to have a lot of privileged to be willing to make yourself vulnerable. Because some people are already vulnerable and marginal and they cannot take certain risks online.

In addition to whether they can share themselves online, the other consideration is whether they must?

I wonder then if the title should be why some teachers are turning to Twitter and what does this say about education? Personally, I wonder whether more teachers will turn to the open web and a better web? Here is to hoping.