Liked Creativity in the classroom (C2 Melbourne)
Organising a timetable that functions efficiently and also embraces Asimovโ€™s conditions, providing the appropriate time and pace for our students to be deeply creative is a complex issue. It will be one of the biggest hurdles for our schools to overcome and is a vital component of contemporary learning design. Changing the way we organise time might just be the key to unlocking the ideal conditions for creativity in schools.
Bookmarked Make it (austinkleon.com)
Austin Kleon reflects on creativity and being an artist This is a good introduction to his work.

There are a number of interesting quotes, such as:

It is by doing the work that you uncover who you are, what you are about and what’s inside of you.

And:

When you really don’t want something, that’s when you get it.

And:

Invest in your tools, make then available and work in a way where you are not judging what you do.

Bookmarked Class Exploder: NetNarr Lesson on the Gameboard of Digital Redlining (CogDogBlog)

My blog is a place where I take apart my ideas, and piece by piece, tell the story of how they were made. Each episode is produced and edited by host and creator aka me, wherever I am. Using the jumbled, thought tracks that keep me awake at night, I ask myself to delve into the specific decisions that went into creating my work. I barely edit them, and not frequently enough checking for typos, but condensing the story to be tightly focused on how bring my ideas to life.

Class Exploder
Alan Levine riffs on Song Exploder and the way in which each episode deconstructs a song bit by bit. He uses this as a model for reflecting on a lesson as an invitation for blogging. Not only is Levine’s example that he provides an interesting task in itself, but the whole activity bank is a great example of the heutagogical nature of Communities of Practice.
Creativity Tips #9: The IKEA Effect and Meraki
In this creativity tip, Amy Burvall talks about the idea of doing enough to feel that you have played a part in the process. This is called the ‘IKEA Effect’s, after the company that has made its name supporting people in the construction of flatpacked creations.

The IKEA effect is a cognitive bias in which consumers place a disproportionately high value on products they partially created.source

For me, this is what makes the #IndieWeb (and DoOO) special. It provides the tools and techniques to make and manage your own creations on the web, without starting from scratch.

Replied to Creativity Tips Vlog Series: 1-10 #LDvid30 (AmusED)
Thanks to the inspiration of @karenmolonely of Sydney and my friend Helen Blunden of Melbourne Iโ€™ve taken up the challenge of recording a short (under 3 min) video each day and contributing tโ€ฆ
I love this Amy. It reminds me of microcasts. The rawness and reflective nature. I am also reminded of George Couros’ idea of #EDUin30 based on Twitter’s constraint of 30 seconds.

Another thing you could do is add your videos to Huffduffer using Ryan Barrett’s bookmarklet for video. This would allow you to create a quasi-podcast from your vlogs, although it would be temporary as Barrett only holds the audio stripped from YouTube for 30 days. It is a start though.

Replied to Issue #149 of the TL;DR Newsletter - rethinking the simple bare necessities. by (TLDR)
Interesting view from Tom Hulme of Google Ventures arguing that teaching kids to code isnโ€™t the future proofed ticket to future jobs as framed by many people. Deep machine learning will likely automate the writing of code relatively quickly. Creativity is going to be far more important in a future where software can code better than we can.
Wondering Ian if ‘coding’ can actually be a part of creativity? In my current work, I need to think creatively to design a solution that can accommodate a number of scenarios and situations, while at the same time being relatively simple. For me, this is about working within the constraints. I may not know how to code my solutions, but I am not going to buy a future where I have no knowledge of the way things work. I work with too many people who think they can make decisions (creative or critical) without understanding the context at hand.
Bookmarked The ones who disappear (austinkleon.com)
โ€œI chose not to take the standard options in my business โ€“ going to Vegas and singing your great hits, if youโ€™re lucky, or going to hell, which is where Elvis went,โ€ Lennon said. โ€œWalking away is much harder than carrying on.โ€
Austin Kleon collects together a number of perspectives on the challenges of walking away and finding balance. Kleon discusses the choices of Rick Moranis and John Lennon’s choices to stay at home with children.

This seems in contrast to those like Robyn Williams whose lives are deeply connected to their art. As Cherri Minns describes:

If he wasnโ€™t working, he was a shell of himself. And when he worked, it was like a light bulb was turned on.