Bookmarked Learning for learning’s sake (austinkleon.com)
Setting aside the importance of hobbies and the amateur spirit, what worries me the most is this faulty idea that you should only spend time learning about things if they have a definite “ROI.” Creative people are curious people, and part of being a creative person is allowing yourself the freedom to let your curiosity lead you down strange, divergent paths. You just cannot predict how what you learn will end up “paying off” later.Who’s to say what is and what isn’t professional development? (An audited calligraphy class winds up changing the design of computers, etc.)
Austin Kleon responds to the challenge associated with ‘learning for learning’s sake’. He suggests that we need to invest in hobbies and curiosity, just as much as we focus on ‘return on investment’.

This is the trouble we often have with schools, of course: When education is seen as an investment, we decide what students should be spending time on based on what is shown (or believed, rather) to have a return on investment in the marketplace. (And not that we really have any idea.)

This reminds me of Amy Burvall’s point that “in order to connect dots, one must first have the dots”. Also, Janice Kaplan discusses the importance of engaging with curiosity.

Creativity Tips #9: The IKEA Effect and Meraki
In this creativity tip, Amy Burvall talks about the idea of doing enough to feel that you have played a part in the process. This is called the ‘IKEA Effect’s, after the company that has made its name supporting people in the construction of flatpacked creations.

The IKEA effect is a cognitive bias in which consumers place a disproportionately high value on products they partially created.source

For me, this is what makes the #IndieWeb (and DoOO) special. It provides the tools and techniques to make and manage your own creations on the web, without starting from scratch.

Replied to Creativity Tips Vlog Series: 1-10 #LDvid30 (AmusED)
Thanks to the inspiration of @karenmolonely of Sydney and my friend Helen Blunden of Melbourne I’ve taken up the challenge of recording a short (under 3 min) video each day and contributing t…
I love this Amy. It reminds me of microcasts. The rawness and reflective nature. I am also reminded of George Couros’ idea of #EDUin30 based on Twitter’s constraint of 30 seconds.

Another thing you could do is add your videos to Huffduffer using Ryan Barrett’s bookmarklet for video. This would allow you to create a quasi-podcast from your vlogs, although it would be temporary as Barrett only holds the audio stripped from YouTube for 30 days. It is a start though.

Replied to Treading on Dreams: The Art of the #lookdown by Amy Burvall (AmusED)
Recently on a trip to Vancouver, Canada and Australia I decided to make a point of archiving some of the magnificent surfaces beneath my boots, and entitled the series #thesebootsaremadeforwalking.
It is fascinating to think about this idea Amy, having been in the middle of a conversation when you spotted your unicorn:

Amy's Canberra Unicorn

I had a similar experience with Alan Levine when I met up with him in Melbourne:


“Pick Your Lift” by cogdogblog is licensed under CC0

Having followed both of your work for some time, it was intriguing to see it all unfold serendipitously in real time.

In part I guess this falls under the wider notion of transparency, yet is somehow different. It is the context that often sits outside of the page (or post). Rather than worrying about which ‘tool’ the artist uses, it provides an insight into the life of the artist.

When I think about my own habits, I feel I am curious when it comes to the digital world, but could be more open to the physical world. For example, I recently discovered an initiative via Ian O’Byrne where trees in Melbourne are assigned an email address. To be fair, I love to go walking, but am often to busy in thought to notice the thriving world around me, let alone at my feet. This initiative at least helped call that out.

I found this the best thing about your sessions in Canberra. It is almost as if they provide ‘permission’ to somehow let go and be curious.

Maybe like Adrian Camm’s ‘permission to innovate’:

Permission to Innovate (Adrian Camm)


Permission to Innovate

Maybe you could give out literal permission to be curious cards?

Replied to #rawthought: Weed or Wish: Sunday Morning Metaphors (AmusED)
what if what we thought was detrimental was really beneficial? what if the messy was better than the perfectly manicured? what if the foreign (or at least outside influence) was better than the domestic?
Amy, this reminds me of your post about balance and seasons. So often we focus our attention of giving student choice and action, without scaffolding to that point.

We cannot just rip the ‘weeds’ out. There must be flowers in their place for the bees. This is not about ignoring the weeds to me, but accepting then for now for the place they serve.

I think that Benjamin Doxtdator captures this in a recent post on instruction in the classroom:

There is a strong and powerful role for direct instruction and using model texts, but this must take place inside a larger liberatory project that aims to undo deficit theories of language use.

It is about the intent and sometimes that is where the wish lays waiting.

Bookmarked The gardens where ideas grow by Austin Kleon (austinkleon.com)
Many musicians who use recording technology as a compositional tool refer to their studios as gardens. It’s an interesting contrast to Motown, which was conceived as a factory, or Warhol’s studio, which was actually named The Factory.
Austin Kleon discusses gardening as a metaphor for creativity, referencing artists such as Prince and Brian Eno. I have written about gardening in regards to learning before and the way in which a garden never stops growing, even if you stop caring for it. Michael Caulfield uses the metaphors of the garden and the stream to discuss the web, with the garden being rhizomatic in nature without a centralised structure, whereas the stream brings everything together. Amy Burvall considers the cycles that exist within the garden, suggesting that there is a time to grow and a time to flower. I am interested in investigating the different sorts of ideas and creativity within the garden. I wonder about the propagation of covering other artists? Is this borrowing second-rate? Where does this fit within the cycle? Or is it a reminder that we need dots to make new dots.
Replied to
Amy, your presentation captures succinctly many of the dots you have collected and curated over time. It brings together so many posts that I have loved over the years, including:

  • There’s No Copyright for Cookies
  • What If We…Ditch “Best Practices”?
  • Just Make Stuff
  • Make Du Jour
  • Plus Ca Change
  • It is so easy to overlook the time and effort associated with something like this.

    It can sometimes be hard to see the possibility of blogging and the web. For me it is about continually joining the dots and making the connections. As Amy Burvall highlights,

    In order to connect dots, one must first have the dots

    That is the power of Webmentions. My little callout to say, “Hey, interesting idea(s)”. Sharing is where it starts.