Listened Cory Doctorow, Meet the Writers 123 - Radio from Monocle
The British-Canadian journalist and author – co-founder of β€˜Boing Boing’, one of the most influential blogs in the world – talks about his vision for our digital world.


Cory Doctorow talks about his education, growing up with mainframes, the consumption of news and engaging with others,

Some interesting quotes:

On Succeeding in Technology

If you really want a good job in tech then you should have the good fortune of being born in 1971 … Anyone who is my age who made a living in technology just got lucky by when they were born.

Paying for the Product

They say if you are not paying for that you are the product, what we see in an era of unregulated monopolism is that people who are paying for it are still the product. You buy an iPhone or an Android Phone and it is loaded with survellieance technology … If you are a farmer and you drive your 1/2 million dollar John Deer tracker around your fields, it is gathering telemtery on your fields … Monsanto takes that data and sells it back to you in seed, while John Deer takes that data and sells it to the futures market.

People Are Free, not the Internet

The internet does not want to be free, people do.

Riding the Highs and Lows

It does not matter how delicious the punch is if there is a turd floating in the punch bowl

via Chris Aldrich

Liked IndieWeb Journalism in the Wild by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
This is a generally brilliant set up for any researcher, professor, journalist, or other stripe of writer for providing online content, particularly when they may be writing for a multitude of outlets.
Bookmarked NAPLAN's writing test is 'bizarre' but here's how kids can get top marks (ABC News)
Last October, Dr Perelman was commissioned to conduct a review of ACARA's planned automated essay-scoring known as "robot marking". His review was critical, sparked concern among education ministers, and finally led to the scrapping of the plan.
I love the addition of a guide how to game the test. I remember a friend doing something similar during VCE, where he intentionally focused on learning words to really refine his writing. Might have been different, but seems a long way from Orwell’s idea of the English language.
Bookmarked How to Write an Edu-book (The Confident Teacher)
I wanted to share my own edu-bookery. It is important to state that for me, regular blogging and writing separate to a book is an excellent mental work-bench for writing a book, offering me the discipline needed to write habitually and at length. Still, my book writing process is really quite specific and I have fell upon a helpful habit in writing my latest book.
Alex Quigley discusses his six steps to writing a book:

  1. Coin an idea and chapter structure
  2. Delve into the research
  3. Review the notes
  4. Transfer notes to seperate word files
  5. Write the book
  6. Draft and edit

In addition to the reflections from Mary Myatt, Tom Sherrington and Ryan Holiday, they offer a useful insight into the writing process. It is interesting to compare these with the process often taught in schools. So often students get straight into writing without giving time to the initial planning process.

Replied to Find a Doorway That Fits Us Both by Tom Barrett (The Curious Creative)
As King suggests the first line is an invitation. As a teacher this might be the first interaction in a school day, or the opening activity of a period of learning. Crucial moments to draw learners in and engage their curiosity.
I think that this counts for blogs as well. With the statistics suggesting that people rarely read beyond the first few lines, it is important to make it count. For the last year I have been starting each post with an ‘excerpt’ that hopefully helps readers know if it is of interest.
Bookmarked Cursive Handwriting and Other Education Myths (Nautilus)
The grip that cursive has on teaching is sustained by folklore and prejudice.
This is a deep dive into the benefits of cursive handwriting. This is another one of those ‘the way it has always been done’ stories. It is useful to read this along side Bernard Bull’s post and the Future Tense podcast which explores handwriting in general.
Bookmarked Thoughts as nest eggs (austinkleon.com)
By simply writing down a thought, you encourage more thoughts to come. When you have enough thoughts pushed together in the same space β€” a collage of thoughts, juxtaposed β€” they often lead to something totally new. This is the magic of writing.
Austin Kleon continues his reading of Thoreau, this time sharing a quote discussing the idea of writing as a way of rescuing thought. He extends with the idea of the ‘nest egg’, an idea that produces new (and original) ideas.