Bookmarked Raised by YouTube by Alexis C. Madrigal (The Atlantic)
Maybe better or more refined solutions exist, but if the history of children’s television teaches us anything, it’s that the market alone will not generate the best outcomes for kids. Nor is the United States government likely to demand change, at least not without prompting. Heroes will have to emerge to push for change in the new YouTube’d world, just as they did in the early days of broadcast children’s TV. And not all of those heroes will come from the Western world. They’ll come from all over the globe, maybe even Chennai.
Alexis Madrigal looks at the rise of YouTube and its impact on children. She focuses on Chu Chu TV and how it came to be. Madrigal also makes an attempt to place YouTube on a longer timeline associated with children’s media.
Replied to
I would argue that not so Ace-of-Base electronica is in part the consequence of teaming up with Mouse on Mars:

The Dessners were immersed in electronic experimentation last year when, randomly, they liaised with German techno-types Mouse On Mars in Berlin and, as a result, Sleep Well Beast opens with what might pass as Kompakt-brand micro-house in ‘Nobody Else Will Be There’ – the baritone Berninger singing restrainedly over piano and strings accompanied by glitches ‘n’ twitches.

Bookmarked Rise of the machines: has technology evolved beyond our control? by James Bridle (the Guardian)
Technology is starting to behave in intelligent and unpredictable ways that even its creators don’t understand. As machines increasingly shape global events, how can we regain control?
In an extract from James Bridle’s new book New Dark Age: Technology and the End of the Future, he discusses the evolution of the machine. This includes the place of the cloud, algorithmic interactions within the stock marker, the corruption of the internet of things and incomprehensibility of machine learning. Bridle believes that we need to reimagine how we think about technology:

Our technologies are extensions of ourselves, codified in machines and infrastructures, in frameworks of knowledge and action. Computers are not here to give us all the answers, but to allow us to put new questions, in new ways, to the universe

This is a part of a few posts from Bridle going around at the moment, including a reflection on technology whistleblowers and YouTube’s response to last years exposé. Some of these ideas remind me of some of the concerns raised in Martin Ford’s Rise of the Robots and Cathy O’Neil’s Weapons of Math Destruction.

Watched Lessons from the Screenplay from YouTube
With Lessons from the Screenplay, I make videos that analyse movie scripts to examine exactly how and why they are so good at telling their stories. Part educational series and part love letter to awesome films, Lessons from the Screenplay aims to be a fun way to learn more about your favourite films and help us all become better storytellers.
In this YouTube channel, Michael Tucker breaks down the art of film and scriptwriting. A useful resource for breaking down various techniques associated with storytelling. Australian Centre for the Moving Image and Amazon provides some other useful resources associated with films and storytelling.

via Kevin Hodgson

Liked Why everyone is talking about Childish Gambino's by Cory Doctorow (Boing Boing)

Clearly we're at a stretched-thin moment of tension about race, inequality and gender in America and elsewhere. It's much harder to explain why we like something than why we hate it, and to be honest, I'm at a loss for words. I've been watching this all week, hoping I'd find some way to express what I'm seeing there that keeps me coming back. I never found it. But I just watched it again.

For something different, see this pixelated recreation of the music video.