Replied to a post by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
No #IndieWeb WordPress work for me on Day 11. Classes start today. I will tack another day on the end. Yesterday I did get to play with a lot of the post-kind/bridgy/Twitter functionality.
I have been following with interest your questions and queries in the <a https://chat.indieweb.org/wordpress/2018-05-23#bottom” rel=”noopener” target=”_blank”>IndieWeb chat, especially in regards to WordPress. I thought it might be useful to document my workflow associated with Read Write Collect for you:

1. Start with a bookmarklet (desktop) or url forwarder (mobile) to begin the process.

2. Adjust the Post Kind response properties. This might include adding missing information and a quote. Lately – inspired by Chris Aldrich’s posts – I have taken to using HTML to add media or multiple paragraphs into the ‘quote’ box.

3. Copy the title from the response properties to the post title and slug. I also add an emoji to the title associated with the post kind. I used to just add the title, but had issues with the emoji being added to the permalink, so short of developing a theme-based solution that strips any emoji from the permalink, I have taken to manually creating the link.

4. Add content to the post, whether it be a reflection or further summary.

5. Add categories (‘contributions’, ‘creations’ or ‘responses’), tags (usually at least three) and feature images (where applicable)

6. Choose where to POSSE: G+ (Jetpack), Mastadon (Mastadon Autopost) and Twitter, Flickr and Diigo (SNAP). I tried Bridgy a while ago, but it never seemed to work. I probably should return to it, but like the flexibility to adjust posts using SNAP. I really wish that there was only one spot for all of them, but live with it for now.

7. If I manually POSSE (usually when replying to other posts), I return and add these to the syndication links.

I am sure I have missed aspects, but hopefully it helps.

Doctoral Research Image
Doctoral Research Image
Ian Guest created an image to visualise the ‘flânerie’ on Twitter. In a second version, Ian creates a gif to show the three layers.

“Doctoral Research Image” by IaninSheffield https://flickr.com/photos/ianinsheffield/40631136105 is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA

He also documents his thinking:

One of @meteropologeny’s maps was imported into Inkscape and created as a base layer onto which other layers were added.
Tweets were dropped on top of the district blocks. Fitting them to the size and shape of the buildings was possible, but I felt they began to lose their inherent ‘tweetness,’ so left them as simple rectangles. This meant I needed to mask out the underlying buildings …
Which is where the idea for using the Twitter bird came from, although …
It was important as a flâneur not to lose the sense of cityscape, so the next stage brought that back and introduced the different districts or quartiers as ways to categorise the tweets.
As explained previously, these tweets were arranged into different quartiers …
… with the whole street plan reintroduced so one might imagine a walk around the city whilst encountering the kinds of activity seen when wandering the Twitter timeline.
The street names are formed from blog post titles, each street intersecting the quartiers which the contents of the post exemplify.
In the final stage, for simplicity, the tweets are wiped and replaced by illustrative snippets from the blog posts on adjacent streets.

I particularly like Ian’s take on interpretations associated with the various layers. I remember creating a similar thing with transparencies in a project when I was at university.

Replied to
Thanks for the shoutout. I too agree with Naomi, not sure my blog is always ‘school’ based either. I simply read, write and respond 🤷🏼‍♂️ I also write a monthly newsletter too

📓 Notes from Canberra EdTechTeam Summit

Rushton Hurley Keynote

Rushton Hurley:

“We do not spend enough time on the pedagogical implications of ‘fun’ and ‘cool'”

“Don’t worry if it doesn’t work, it happens all the time. Have a go at something different.”

“Our job is to inspire our students … having fun is an important part of that.”

“How often do we have in our heads exactly what we mean?”

“You could be that teacher that gives a student hope for the future”

“The only person to who you ever need compare yourself is the you who you were yesterday” #edtechteam

Discussing the Five Day Teacher Challenge http://rushtonh.com/category/the-5-day-teacher-challenge/ and getting better #edtechteam

“Can you go the whole day without asking the question: do you know the right answer or raising your voice once” #edtechteam

Next Vista For Learning provides a library of free videos made by and for teachers and students everywhere www.nextvista.org/ #edtechteam

“How do we make learning effective and memorable … will it be remembered in 20-years time?” #edtechteam

“Creativity is a muscle that we exercise” -> is blogging and reflection a muscle too?

Critical Creativity

Amy Burvall:

Notes associated with ‘Critical Creativity: Creating with Words, Images and Sounds’ https://sites.google.com/view/amyburvallettcanberrasummit/home/critical-creativity-workshops #edtechteam

“Through making we have meaning” #edtechteam

“Rigorous Whimsy is purposeful play” CC @mythsysizer

Jenga Poetry -> this reminds me of @ddonahoo and Lego Poetry https://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/art-and-design/a-colourful-case-of-writers-blocks-20110527-1f7ul.html

Four Fun and Powerful Activities for Starting Class

Rushton Hurley:

Choose an obscure image and make connections with learning. -> @kathleen_morris has a great resource to support finding images

“Best people to create questions are the students. Create a question and four answers. Get them to explain why they made the choices that they did”

Q & A with Suan Yeo

Suan:

Google have developed a solution with managed devices to run NAPLAN on Chromebook through a locked-down browser app

Showing the Jamboard app via iOS and Android. Beyond that, users can still view. -> Reminds me a lot of Explain Everything

Amy Burvall Keynote

amyburvall:

“We are surrounded by poetry on all sides” -> you just need to see it #edtechteam

“If you share your work with a wider audience, you never know who you might effect”

A collection of history videos for music lovers https://www.youtube.com/user/historyteachers/videos

On the IKEA effect. The accomplishment of putting a little bit of effort to achieve something.

Never say, “I’m just a teacher” Everyone is an artist!

Creativity is connecting dots https://amysmooc.wordpress.com/2017/08/06/rawthought-on-ditching-the-dangerous-dichotomy-between-content-knowledge-and-creativity/

“For if you know it you can change it”

“If they build it they will get it”

“Imagination is the root of empathy”

The best app on your phone is your camera. -> Gary Stager has written about this http://stager.tv/blog/?p=2791

“The most famous remix is the alphabet”

“We need to make our disciplines dance together”

“Get to the ‘ness’ of something”

“Creativity thrives on time, trust and tools”

Sometimes we need to get up, get out and go walkabout https://amysmooc.wordpress.com/2014/08/16/pd-walkabout-a-tourist-in-ones-own-land/

Site Maintenance

Simon Ashby:

The power and potential of Google Sites http://bit.ly/newsitesNZ #edtechteam

Sites can now be found through Google Drive -> here is a link to all the new Google Sites on one page https://sites.google.com/new?usp=jotspot_si

Sites provide the flexibility of adjusting the privacy of spaces https://gsuiteupdates.googleblog.com/2018/01/publish-google-sites-to-specific-audience.html

“Sites now allows you to embed” -> one potential workaround for ‘conversations’ is to use Padlet https://www.teachercast.net/blog/how-to-add-a-blog-or-comments-box-in-new-googlesites-using-padlet/

Share your computer’s screen from one Chrome browser to another https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/google-cast-for-education/bnmgbcehmiinmmlmepibeeflglhbhlea

SheetsGeek

Jay Atwood:

Coding is for Losers https://sites.google.com/edtechteam.com/jay/coding-is-for-losers-computational-thinking-with-sheets HT @LosersHQ

If you click ‘create new rule’ when doing conditional formatting before pressing ‘done’ then it will copy all the ingredients of the previous rules #sheetsgeek

Whenever you are working with a formula, it can be good to work from inside out #edtechteam #SheetsGeek

Two YouTube playlists associated with Google Sheets: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2Nrs6rglVNEtgl2YcPy-dVIGad0Luehn&disable_polymer=true and https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6B2lA5Vd2A78PPIzDrTtAvZq6HiG0kU7

One of the key concepts when working with a database, if you ever want to change the data then always go back to the source

Replied to Why teachers are turning to Twitter by Brendon Hyndman (The Conversation)
Rather than a one-off professional learning event (such as a conference), Twitter provides a low-cost, easy to access platform. It requires little effort beyond 280 character posts or photos to connect with a range of education professionals, leaders and organisations.
I am a massive advocate of open education. I feel the possibility of a wider audience has taken my learning to a new level. Reading this post, I just feel that there is a massive question not considered.

If you interviewed my last year, would I provide the same response as I do now?

My experience of Twitter has waned of late. I still share there. I still engage with people. However, I have moved my learning to my own space. I think that this is important.

As with all technology, Twitter is ever evolving. The most recent news has been the depreciation of their API that allows for the development of external applications. Each of these changes has a consequence.

The other concern I have is which teachers are turning to Twitter? Chris Wejr questions whether every teacher is able to share who they are online?. Maha Bali also captures this in regards to open education:

what kind of privileges do we have that give us the power to have a space there – things like the English language, having the capacity for a good bandwidth on in the internet to do something like virtually connecting, having TIME to spare and being financially comfortable, being naturally willing to expose yourself and make yourself vulnerable – you have to have a lot of privileged to be willing to make yourself vulnerable. Because some people are already vulnerable and marginal and they cannot take certain risks online.

In addition to whether they can share themselves online, the other consideration is whether they must?

I wonder then if the title should be why some teachers are turning to Twitter and what does this say about education? Personally, I wonder whether more teachers will turn to the open web and a better web? Here is to hoping.

Liked 👓 Apps of a Feather by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
If I was sitting on a huge pile of Twitter related code with a full set of Twitter related reading/posting functionality, I think I’d head toward some of the new open protocols coming out of the IndieWeb to build a new user base. By supporting feeds like RSS, ATOM, JSON feed, and even h-feed (possibly via Microsub) for the feed reader portion and building in the open Micropub spec, one could rejuvenate old Twitter apps to work with a myriad of microblog-like (and even traditional blog) functionality on platforms like WordPress, Drupal, Craft, WithKnown, Jekyll, Kirby, Hugo, micro.blog, and a myriad of others in the future. Suddenly all those old Twitter apps could rise from the ashes and invigorate a new, more open community. Given the open “architecture” of the community, it would give developers much more direct control of both their software and futures than Twitter has ever given them as well as a deeper sense of impact while simultaneously eating a nice portion of Twitter’s lunch. With less than a week’s worth of work, I suspect that many of these old apps could have new and more fruitful lives than the scraps they were getting before.
Bookmarked The four types of online discussion. Where are you? by wiobyrne (W. Ian O'Byrne)
The four types of discussion found online can be used to identify the general tendencies individuals have as they communicate, comment, and react in online spaces. An individual may have a series of posts and comments that spread across multiple quadrants as they socialize and participate in online spaces. Yet, wherever there is a large concentration of messages on this model, that identifies the type of communication you generally engage in.

This matrix really has me thinking, especially about different contexts online. For example, with a Twitter chats, when you have different people meeting together with different intents (dialogue vs. debate), how is it that it works? Or does it?

Liked WordPress Plugin to Find Waldo in a Twitter TAGs Conversation Explorer by Profile Picture for Alan Levine aka CogDog  Alan Levine aka CogDogProfile Picture for Alan Levine aka CogDog Alan Levine aka CogDog (CogDogBlog)
I’m a huge fan and repeat user of Martin Hawksey’s Twitter TAGS. If you are doing a class or project with activity around a hashtag, and you are not using this tool, just stop everything and set one up. It’s rather brilliant, a Google Spreadsheet with some Hawksey-ian script genius underneath...