Bookmarked Privacy Postcards, or Poison Pill Privacy by Bill FitzgeraldBill Fitzgerald (FunnyMonkey)

For those who want to use this structure to create your own Privacy Postcards, I have created a skeleton structure on Github. Please, feel free to clone this, copy it, modify it, and make it your own.

Bill Fitzgerald provides a framework for unpacking privacy when it comes to apps, especially in the Play Store.
Listened Golden State Killer: the end of DNA privacy? Chips with Everything podcast by Jordan Erica Webber from the Guardian

US investigators recently tracked down the suspect of a 40-year-old murder case after uploading DNA to a genealogy website. Jordan Erica Webber weighs up the pros of finding ancestors with the cons of selling privacy

Jordan Erica Webber talks to Prof Charles Tumosa of the University of Baltimore, Prof Denise Syndercombe-Court of Kingโ€™s College and Lee Rainie of the Pew Research Center. This is a challenging conversation and comes back to notions of ‘informed consent’.

Maggie Koerth-Baker discusses changes in data arguing that we need to stop seeing privacy as a ‘personal’ thing:

Experts say these examples show that we need to think about online privacy less as a personal issue and more as a systemic one. Our digital commons is set up to encourage companies and governments to violate your privacy. If you live in a swamp and an alligator attacks you, do you blame yourself for being a slow swimmer? Or do you blame the swamp for forcing you to hang out with alligators?

Bookmarked The Indieweb privacy challenge (Webmentions, silo backfeeds, and the GDPR) // Sebastian Greger by   (sebastiangreger.net)
Originally intended to showcase a privacy-centred implementation of emerging social web technologies โ€“ with the aim to present a solution not initially motivated by legal requirements, but as an example of privacy-aware interaction design โ€“ my โ€œsocial backfeedโ€ design process unveiled intricate challenges for Indieweb sites, both for privacy in general and legal compliance in particular.
As someone involved in K-12 education, I always wonder where the #IndieWeb might sit. This analysis of webmentions and privacy from Sebastian Gregor poses so many questions and things to consider. I was particularly intrigued about the questions of dragging in ‘likes and favourites’ which might be used and interpreted in different ways.

From an ethical design perspective, however, I still have a stomach ache thinking of publishing the name and image of unknowing Twitter users on an unrelated website, presenting a โ€œlikeโ€ potentially intended as a bookmark of a short tweet as a โ€œlikeโ€ for a long essay on some blog site they have never visited. Here, too, some kind of transparency/consent mechanism would be required; and while I am sorry to not have a ready solution to offer, the idea of simply warning about a backfeed in a sticky post on top of a timeline is not really something I consider sufficient. Likely, the solution for the silo backfeeds would have to come after a solution for Webmentions in general has been developed.

Just thinking about my own use, I usually use the ‘Like’ post-kind to recognise posts that I find interesting, but do not have anything to add (that would be a bookmark.) This does not mean I ‘like’ the post or agree with everything written. This is where confusion can occur.

I think this is one of those posts that I will come back to as my knowledge of webmentions and the #IndieWeb continues to grow and evolve.

Liked How firms you have never interacted with can target your Facebook by Alex Hern (the Guardian)

Facebook provides me with the ability to opt out of advertising from those companies, just by clicking a cross in the corner. All I need to do is devote some time to clicking a small button 174 times in a row and I am free from those companies โ€“ at least until the next 174 decide to upload my information.

What I cannot do is anything with real power. I cannot tell Facebook that the vast majority of these companies cannot possibly have acquired my email address legitimately; I cannot opt out of them all at once, defenestrating advertisers in their masses with a single click; and I certainly cannot request that no company be able to target me simply by uploading an easily guessable address to the site.

Replied to Facebook scraped call, text message data for years from Android phones [Updated] (Ars Technica)
If you granted permission to read contacts during Facebook's installation on Android a few versions agoโ€”specifically before Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean)โ€”that permission also granted Facebook access to call and message logs by default. The permission structure was changed in the Android API in version 16. But Android applications could bypass this change if they were written to earlier versions of the API, so Facebook API could continue to gain access to call and SMS data by specifying an earlier Android SDK version. Google deprecated version 4.0 of the Android API in October 2017โ€”the point at which the latest call metadata in Facebook users' data was found. Apple iOS has never allowed silent access to call data.
Isn’t WhatsApp built on access to your contacts? And isn’t it owned by Facebook?
Bookmarked Gold Coast council dumps plan to mine Facebook data from Commonwealth Games visitors using free wi-fi - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) (mobile.abc.net.au)
A plan to mine data from Commonwealth Games visitors who use free high speed wi-fi has been dumped by Gold Coast City Council a day after it was reported by the ABC. Originally the council was going to require people to use their Facebook login if they wanted fast wi-fi. Council told the ABC it would collect some data from users' Facebook pages including their age, nationality and gender.
Is this the start of many reflections based on the Cambridge Analytica revelations? In part this reminds me of the changes in the way people saw things after Snowden. Thinking about Doug Belshaw’s web timeline:

โ— 1993-1997: The Information Superhighway

โ— 1999-2002: The Wild West

โ— 2003-2007: The Web 2.0 era

โ— 2008-2012: The Era of the App

โ— 2013+: The Post-Snowden era

I wonder if this will be another shift?

Listened Episode 77: Attention and Regrets (and the Tech Industry) from The Contrafabulists Podcast
In this episode, Kin and Audrey talk about the tech "regrets" industry, the attention economy, and more.
Kin Lane and Audrey Watters discuss the wave of people coming out in regret. The problem is not ‘attention’ or ‘addiction’ but about ‘markets’ and ‘survelliance’. They warn that we need to continue to be critical about how these new ‘humane’ companies are addressing issues such as privacy.
Liked Google and Facebook are watching our every move online. It's time to make them stop by Gabriel Weinberg, CEO and founder of DuckDuckGo (CNBC)
Google, Facebook hidden trackers follow users around the web at alarming rates, says DuckDuckGo's CEO Gabriel Weinberg. To make any real progress in advancing data privacy this year, we have to start doing something about them. Not doing so would be like trying to lose weight without changing your diet. Simply ineffective.
Bookmarked More on the mechanics of GDPR (Open Educational Thinkering)
Note: I'm writing this post on my personal blog as I'm still learning about GDPR. This is me thinking out loud, rather than making official Moodle pronouncements. 'Enjoyment' and 'compliance-focused courses' are rarely uttered in the same breath. I have, however, enjoyed my second week of learning from Futurelearn's
Doug Belshaw breaks down a number of points associated with the GDPR. During TIDE, he also makes the point that this will set a precedence moving forward in regards to the collection of data so will therefore have an influence on everyone. Eylan Ezekiel also provided a useful discussion a few months a go.