Listened SEASON 2! Episode 1 Permission and SEO and Blogs by Seth Godin from Akimbo
Seth Godin reflects on the changes to his blog over time. This is related to his recent move to WordPress as a blogging platform. In the process he discusses changes to blogging, particularly related to SEO. He also touches on the importance of being specific, generous and consistent enough when connecting ideas.
Replied to Choosing a Music Streaming Service by Chris (Betchablog)
Right now, given that Google Play Music is going away, I’m leaning towards a switch to Spotify. Although if the New YouTube Music service adds the ability to upload my own files, then I could be swayed to stay in Google land, even if they do want an extra $2 a month to remove the ads from YouTube.
I saw all the news about YouTube Music and changes to YouTube Red, however I must have missed the information about the closing of Google Play Music. I wonder what will happen on Android for playing audio? I have actually come to like Google Music, so it is kind of annoying.

📰 eLearn Updates (May 2018)

Here is a collection of links and resources associated with GSuite for May 2018.

Updates

Resources

Drive

Chrome

Research

Docs

Slides

Forms

Sheets

Sites

Classroom

Drawings

Geo Tools

Keep

YouTube

Blogger

General

Replied to Too Long; Didn’t Read #152 (W. Ian O'Byrne)
Well, amazing things happen when you dump that repository of info into one of the world’s best machine learning engines.
I find all these seemingly incidental combinations intriguing for lack of a better word. When Google hit the books, is this what they had in mind? I was reading today about the move away from ‘research’ to ‘AI’. I wonder what the consequences of Sidewalk Labs on military surveillance?
Replied to Google is planning a city. What could go wrong? (ABC News)
Google affiliate Sidewalk Labs has plans to build and run an urban centre in Toronto, Canada. Not everyone is pleased.
The Sidewalk Labs is such an intriguing project. It offers an insight on what could be on so many levels. It is interesting to think about it in regards to the Selfish Ledger and Google’s move into (and out of) military AI. Imagine if they used Sidewalk Labs to hone their ability to identify citizens? Similar to China? And then have another about face and sell this technology to the highest bidder? Time will tell.
Replied to a post (jgregorymcverry.com)
The new Google Sites is just as bad at teaching kids to write the web as the old Google Sites. No where can I find a link to a source code or how to get to a plain text editor. #edtechchat
Firstly Greg, (new) Sites is still in ‘beta’ to my knowledge. Unless it has changed in the last few days with GDPR it is not available in Takeout.

Secondly, I think that they are designing it for automagical websites. You provide the content and AI does the rest. Wasn’t their answer to everything last year AI? (This year it is accessibility IMO).

At least it is easier to use than (old) Sites and responsive.

Replied to Freshly Brewed Thoughts: May 25, 2018 (mailchi.mp)
We know that behaviors can be modified, as a social species we use all kinds of narratives and manipulations to modify behavior. The question is who is trying to modify them and to what purpose. Me debating with myself about machine learning.
I always thought that the best ‘thought experiment’ was and is fiction. Maybe Google should read The Circle. As I watched The Selfish Ledger I wondered how much it would cost to be removed from the grid?
Bookmarked The platform patrons: How Facebook and Google became two of the biggest funders of journalism in the world (Columbia Journalism Review)
Both Google and Facebook may argue—and may even believe—that they simply want to help increase the supply of quality journalism in the world. But the fact remains that they are not just disinterested observers. They are multibillion-dollar entities that compete directly with media companies for the attention of users, and for the wallets of every advertising company that used to help support the business model of journalism. Their funding and assistance can’t be disentangled from their conflicted interests, no matter how much they wish it could.
Google has been really pushing into journalism lately, with the further investment of News Lab and the Digital News Initiative, as well as the ability to subscribe using your Google account. This in part seems to be in response to Facebook’s problems.
Bookmarked Better visions of ourselves: Human futures, user data, & The Selfish Ledger (W. Ian O'Byrne)
I think there is a reasoned response to technopanic. Perhaps a sense of technoagency is necessary. Now more than ever, faster than ever, technology is driving change. The future is an unknown, and that scares us. However, we can overcome these fears and utilize these new technologies to better equip ourselves and steer us in a positive direction.
Ian O’Byrne reflects on the internal video produced by Google Project X focusing on speculative design the notion of a ledger that does not actually belong to the user, but managed by some grand AI.

Although this was designed as a case of ‘what if’, it is a reminder of what could happen. It therefore provides a useful provocation, especially in light of Cambridge Analytica and GDPR. O’Byrne suggests that this is an opportunity to take ownership of our ledger, something in part captured by the #IndieWeb.

I agree with the thinking about this ledger, but do not agree with how it is situated in the video. I would see an opportunity for the individual to determine what information comes in to the ledger, and how it is displayed. As an example, each of the arrows coming pointing in to the ledger could be streams of information from your website, Twitter feed, Strava running app, and any other metrics you’d like to add. Each of these would come in with a modified read/write access, and sharing settings from the originating app/program/service. As the individual, you’d be in control of dictating what you present, and how you present this information in your ledger.

Interestingly, Douglas Rushkoff made the case in a recent episode of Team Human for including less not more on the ledger:

Bookmarked I am a data factory (and so are you) by Nicholas Carr (ROUGH TYPE)
The shift of data ownership from the private to the public sector may well succeed in reducing the economic power of Silicon Valley, but what it would also do is reinforce and indeed institutionalize Silicon Valley’s computationalist ideology, with its foundational, Taylorist belief that, at a personal and collective level, humanity can and should be optimized through better programming.
Nicholas Carr reflects on the metaphors that we use and demonstrates some of the flaws, particularly when they are used against us inadvertently. This is something brought to the for with Google’s effort to support wellbeing. As Arielle Pardes explains:

While Google says “digital wellness” is now part of the company’s ethos, not once during the Google I/O keynote did anyone mention “privacy.”