Bookmarked Why Reputation? by Mike Caulfield (Hapgood)
I have a reputation, which is the trace of past events and current relationships in a social system. But that reputation isn’t really separate from the techniques others use to decode and utilize my reputation for decision-making. This relationship is synergistic.
Responding to Xiao Mina’s reflection on dissensus, Mike Caulfield discusses the challenge of reputation.
Liked The Homeostatic Fallacy and Misinformation Literacy by mikecaulfield (Hapgood)
the goal of disinformation isn’t really around these individual transactions. The goal of disinformation is to, over time, change our psychological set-points. To the researcher looking at individuals at specific points in time, the homeostasis looks protective — fire up Mechanical Turk, see what people believe, give them information or disinformation, see what changes. What you’ll find is nothing changes — set-points are remarkably resilient. But underneath that, from year to year, is drift. And its the drift that matters.
Liked In the Web’s Hyperreality, Information Is Experience by an author (Hapgood)
But whatever your take, I encourage you to think of disinformation in this way, at least for a bit  — not as the spread of false information, but as the hacking of the simulated reality which we all must necessarily inhabit. As something that does not just change knowledge, but which produces new life experiences as real as the the Iraq War, your neighbor’s fight with cancer, or your child’s illness. To see it in this way is perhaps more terrifying, but ultimately necessary as we attempt to address the problem.
Replied to 👓 Does anyone else keep their own knowledge wiki? | Lobsters by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich
Replied to Does anyone else keep their own knowledge wiki? by nikivi (lobste.rs) I’ve been extending and improving my personal wiki for 1 year now and it has been one of the best things I’ve done. I found writing blog posts was too high friction and very often didn’t finish things because th...
I really like Mike Caulfield’s Wikity theme. I reflected upon my experience here. I decided though to incorporate it into my ‘Collect’ site. My only point of confusion about the blog versus wiki is that Wikity is in fact built around ‘posts’ and WordPress.
Liked It’s Not About the “Heat” of the Rhetoric, It’s About Its Toxicity by Mike Caulfield (Hapgood)
Meanwhile, post by post, click by click, people of all ages are being slowly groomed into conspiracy cultures that turn fear into violence and authoritarian rule. Once people’s reality is warped in this way, bringing them back is difficult, and yet we are moving at a snail’s pace on educational and technological fronts. The media is still talking about the problem as if the core was people being impolite. The world slowly slides toward a dark future, across the globe. We have educational solutions (just read the rest of this blog) but they remain un-deployed or under-deployed.
Liked We’re Thinking About This Backwards (Hapgood)
While mass education is good and should be pursued as a long-term solution, if I was going to target our online literacy immediately and had a limited number of seats, I would target it at everyone that will find their way to positions of influence. Politicians. Policy leads. Product managers at tech startups. Future FBI agents and social workers and department heads. I would look at the gears of democratic institutions — political, civic, administrative — and see who has their hands on the levers, from the mid-level bureaucrats to the top.
Liked A Short History of CRAAP (Hapgood)
In 2002, Chico State University did a little rearranging and got the letters into the CRAAP acronym. Others organized the questions into RADCAB. And we taught this and its variations for almost twenty years even though it did not work, and most librarians I’ve talked to realized it didn’t work many years back but didn’t know what else to do.
Liked A Roll-Up of Digipo Resources (4 September 2018) (Hapgood)
One of the nice things about running a blog-fueled grassroots semi-funded initiative is the agility. The Digipo project has moved far and fast in the past year. But one of the bad things is all the old blogposts a just a snapshot in time, and often out of date.
Another interesting take on Mike Caulfield’s current work is his post ‘The Fast and Frugal Needs of the Online Reader‘.
Bookmarked The “Always Check” Approach to Online Literacy (Hapgood)
One of the things I’ve been trying to convince people for the past year and a half is that the only viable literacy solution to web misinformation involves always checking any information in your stream that you find interesting, emotion-producing, or shareable. It’s not enough to check the stuff that is suspicious: if you apply your investigations selectively, you’ve already lost the battle.
Mike Caulfield continues his work on fact checking arguing that we need to develop the habit of doing check every time we engage with a new link. He makes the comparison with checking your rear view mirrors when driving.

Now imagine a world where checking your mirrors before switching lanes was rare, three standard-deviations-out behavior. What would the roads look like?

Caulfield focuses on two what is the site and is this new correct true. In a world where abundance is only a click away, maybe we are at a point where it is time to reassess what that actually means.

Bookmarked A Provocation for the Open Pedagogy Community (Hapgood)
All my former university hosted sites are gone. We built up a WPMU instance at Keene in 2010, and the lack of broad adoption meant when I left in 2013 we shut it down. I ran some wiki on university servers here and at Keene, and those are gone too. All my self-hosted sites are corrupted from hacks or transfer errors in imports. Go back into this blog and you’ll find sparse posting schedule for some years between 2010 and 2012 and it’s because those posts got nuked in a 2012 hack. I had to go out to the Wayback Machine and reconstruct the important ones by hand.
Responding to Dave Winer’s news that Harvard are closing down blogs.harvard.edu, the first academic blog hosting space, Mike Caulfield wonders about the temporal nature of institutional and self hosting. He discusses the multitude of sites that have now disappeared as they were either closed or corrupted. This is something he has discussed before. It makes me wonder whether things are any different now? It also makes me wonder about the Domain of One’s Own project and the IndieWeb, what happens when we move out of our homes? What does it mean to have a canonical link or keep a digital commonplace book?