Liked Facing An Unknown Future (DCulberhouse)
If we are not engaging the future thinking necessary to at least try and imagine what the world will be like for today’s kindergartener by the time they graduate…then it will be incredibly difficult for us to even consider how to begin to prepare them for a non-obvious future and an exponentially changing world.
Bookmarked Are we listening? by Jose Picardo (Shooting Azimuths)
The very teachers who read William and nod vigorously about the need to know stuff before you can understand or do stuff in the context of curriculum are unable to draw parallels between their dismissal of digital technology and their own lack of knowledge about it. Rather than finding virtuosity and pride in learning about how what technology works best and in what context—so as to be able to discern the best tool for particular tasks—we seem happy to eschew whole new toolkits on the dodgy grounds of ignorance and misconception.
Jose Picardo argues that the question about whether we should have more or less technology in schools misses the point. What matters is how it is used. For example, those who argue for more knowledge often fail to put the effort into actually understanding how technology is used in education:

Technology can be done well as well as badly. What I am arguing is twofold: firstly that the many of the reasons commonly given against the use of technology are really not very good and betray a fundamental misunderstanding about how technology works to support teaching and learning; and, secondly, that you would be a much better critic of technology if you knew more about its application and its impact, both positive and negative.

This comes back to the importance of why and having a framework to guide you. For a different perspective on technology in the classroom, read David Perry’s thread.

Bookmarked How to Run A Teacher Innovation Pitch At Your School (A.J. JULIANI)

The four questions I keep coming back to again and again when thinking about how to grow a culture of innovation are:


What do we allow for?

What do we make time for?

What do we support?

What do we celebrate and measure?

This comes back to ideas associated with distributed leadership and disciplined collaboration.
Liked Want to Drive Change? Find Your California Roll by Bill Ferriter (The Tempered Radical)
Just because Japanese restaurants wanted to serve exotic recipes to American customers from day one doesn’t mean that American patrons were ready to eat them. Instead, attracting interest and long term commitment meant creating recipes that introduced change incrementally, one new and interesting ingredient at a time.
Listened Revolutionizing Education Through Student Empowerment + Student Centered Learning with Peter Hutton from Modern Learners
Templestowe College, or TC as we call it in Victoria, Australia, was built to accommodate 1,000 students. At the start of 2010, those numbers had dwindled down to just over 200. Peter Hutton took on the challenge of rebuilding the school, despite severe challenges. Today, you will get to hear the story of the past 7 years, and how Peter revolutionized one school by testing assumptions and changing the way they thought about education.
Bruce Dixon and Peter Hutton discuss the story of Templestowe College (or TC) and the new step in extending the ‘revolution’.


Image via The Age