Liked And the word is?…. by an author
Rather than identify a lengthy list of goals or resolutions, I have, instead, chosen a word. Just one word.
Kath Murdoch puts forward the suggestion of focusing on a word, rather than a specific goal. As she elaborates:

My family and friends have a tradition of selecting a word to bring into the new year. Just one, single word. The word provides as a kind of ‘tincture’ to the year – its purpose being to regularly nudge you along a path of your choosing – a path that strengthens you in some way.

I have discussed my concern with goals elsewhere.

Replied to Stop Setting SMART Goals by an author (Cut Through Coaching & Consulting)
Next time you're asked to set a goal why not consider other approaches - for example, an Appreciative Inquiry - to explore the possibilities first. Then, once you've settled on a goal, you can use the SMART acronym to check how well you can articulate your next action.
I agree Dan, SMART goals (or SMARTER goals) can be limiting. In recent years I have chosen to instead focus on one word, based on the work of Kath Murdoch and Edna Sackson. I find this allows for a breadth of opportunities, rather than limiting things.
Bookmarked The 7 Habits: Begin With the End in Mind | The Art of Manliness (The Art of Manliness)
Instead of thinking of mission statements as just a list of ideals, Covey suggests thinking of them like a constitution for a government. Back in my law school days when I wrote legal memos for attorneys, I’d have to lay out the law that governed the case I was writing about. Every time I did so, I had to make, at least in passing, a reference to the U.S. Constitution because the Constitution is the source of all law in the United States. Even if it was a state issue, I referenced the U.S. Constitution (Article 10, baby). With every legal decision, I turned to the Constitution first.
Brett and Kate McKay discuss Covey’s habit of ‘Starting with the end in mind’ and what this might mean for the individual.

They map out three steps to creating your own mission statements:

  • Step 1: Block off uninterrupted time
  • Step 2: Prioritize your roles in life
  • Step 3: Define the purpose of each role

The authors explain that this is about process as much as it is about product. For me it is about intent.

This is a useful resource alongside Adrian Camm’s steps to developing a learning vision.

Bookmarked Trust in the steps. Focussed and whole picture thinking by jennymackness (Jenny Connected)
The last step doesn’t matter as much as you think. It is not about the summit.
This is an interesting reflection on climbing Mt Everest. The idea that the summit does not matter as much as we think reminds of a point that Jeff Haden made on the Curious Minds podcast. He explained that planning for a holiday can actually be more beneficial that going on the holiday. This relates to the arbitrary nature of goals. What matters is that we care.
Replied to Creating a strategic plan for your life by Ian O'Byrne (W. Ian O'Byrne)
We all have dreams, yet many of us chose not to allow them to become reality. There are many factors that may impede or restrict our ability to find a way to implement this plan. There may be specific people that subscribe to old narratives and chose to see us follow in their footsteps. The thing to remember in this process is that we all create and follow our own learning pathways. We should be the ones to determine the direction, goals, and success of our lives.
Ian, I am enjoying your series looking at vision, goals and life. I must admit that I am a little sceptical about ‘SMART’ goals. I like Steve Brophy’s notion of fuzzy goals. You might also be interested in Adrian Camm’s work around vision.
Liked 👍 2018: Lean in, Step up, Reach out (andreastringer.blogspot.com.au)
Recently I shared a professional opportunity with a friend and their response; “You’ve got this!” Three simple words that meant so much. Someone believes that I have the ability and skills to achieve this, and that I am qualified and experienced to be successful. I said it out loud, ‘You’ve got this!’ Then the self talk came into play. You know what?....I have. "I’ve got this!"
Liked Give up or Go up by Lyn (lynhilt.com)
So maybe I’ll focus, instead, on Go Up goals and Give Up goals. Like Seth says in his post, people are generally happy to help you with your give up goals. They’ll remind you to drink less, exercise more, and spend less money. My 2018 give up goals might include be less lazy on the exercise front and eat fewer carbs for breakfast. I’ll try to give up working on a device when my kids are present. I’ll fail, but I’ll try. I’ll give up taking jobs that don’t compensate my worth.
Bookmarked Doing even better things by Dr Deborah M. Netolicky (the édu flâneuse)
I have begun to pare back my obligations. I have turned my email and social media notifications off and buried Facebook in the back of my phone. I’ve withdrawn from my Book Club. I’m reconsidering how often to post on this blog and am thinking perhaps ‘when it takes my fancy’ would be ok, rather than keeping myself to a schedule. I am figuring out how to protect my most productive time for my most important projects and how I might schedule in regular silence and stillness.
Deborah Netolicky reflects on her priorities as a part of her one word this year. She wonders about her choices. This has me reflecting on my own balances.
Bookmarked Something to look forward to (austinkleon.com)
I’d been struggling myself a bit with this re-read and Frankl’s emphasis on the future, how one must keep hope, keep his eye on the horizon. (Though I was particularly taken with his emphasis on imagination: how prisoners hold on by conjuring images of their loved ones, how a patient can sort out her decisions by pretending she’s lying on her death bed, looking back at her life.) I wondered how to reconcile Frank’s hopeful future-facing with my own feeling that life is more like Groundhog Day, and one should operate without hope and without despair.

A goal that isn’t too important makes you live in the moment, and still gives you a driving force. This driving force is a way to get around the fact that we will all die and there is no real point to life.

But with the ASG there is a point. It is not such an important point that you postpone joy to achieve it. It is just a decoy point that keeps you bobbing along, allowing you to find ecstacy in the small things, the unexpected, and the everyday.

What happens when you reach the stupid goal? Then what? You just find a new ASG.

Tamara Shopsin Arbitrary Stupid Goal

via Austin Kleon