Replied Friends don’t let friends use Chromebooks for CoolMath. by Lyn Hilt (lynhilt.com)
The real crisis surrounding technology integration is a leadership crisis. It’s a vision crisis. It’s the crisis that most of our schools are built around teaching cultures, not learning cultures. It’s a lack-of-clarity crisis.
Great post Lyn. I have discussed some of my issues elsewhere. I liked Andy Losik’s response, to highlight the creative possibilities associated with the Chromebook. However, I think that you hit the nail on the head Lyn with your point about vision.

Too often in education, the search is for the one answer. Just as with the wolves of Yellowstone, technology can not solve all our ills. It is only one part of the puzzle:

EdTech Enablers

“EdTech Enablers” by mrkrndvs is licensed under CC BY-SA

I recently reflected upon the place of Google to support librarians. Technology can offer so much, but it needs to connect in with the local context. I think that friends don’t let friends take products straight off the shelf, but that is a conversation for another day.

Liked Give up or Go up by Lyn (lynhilt.com)
So maybe I’ll focus, instead, on Go Up goals and Give Up goals. Like Seth says in his post, people are generally happy to help you with your give up goals. They’ll remind you to drink less, exercise more, and spend less money. My 2018 give up goals might include be less lazy on the exercise front and eat fewer carbs for breakfast. I’ll try to give up working on a device when my kids are present. I’ll fail, but I’ll try. I’ll give up taking jobs that don’t compensate my worth.