Bookmarked Possible cultural & technological futures of digital scholarship (W. Ian O'Byrne)
What I would like to see in this process is a way to connect the dots from the beginning to the end of the manuscript. Something open that allows the author to detail the path taken from the genesis of the piece to the end result. This would allow scholars to post grant funding statements, researcher notes, open data, revisions, and other materials and connect this to the overall result. Viewers of the final published version would be able to look back through the links and chain of documentation to see the work that was embedded in this resultant piece.
Ian O’Byrne discusses the use of the #IndieWeb technologies, such as webmentions and microformats, to document the pre-print process. This could include the use of a digital object identifier that could then be linked to the final peer reviewed publications.
Replied to Too Long; Didn’t Read #152 (W. Ian O'Byrne)
Well, amazing things happen when you dump that repository of info into one of the world’s best machine learning engines.
I find all these seemingly incidental combinations intriguing for lack of a better word. When Google hit the books, is this what they had in mind? I was reading today about the move away from ‘research’ to ‘AI’. I wonder what the consequences of Sidewalk Labs on military surveillance?
Replied to Identifying what we can control in our own lives (W. Ian O'Byrne)
When we have a problem, we know exactly what to work on. When we are stuck and have no idea where to start, we begin working on the obstacle in our path.
I find external influences an interesting topic. I am not sure how stoic I am though.

On a side note, I really enjoyed Kin Lane’s recent post on choosing to ‘seize the day’ and not be overrun by fear.

Each day I am able to seize the widest possible definition of my day that I can. Across multiple cities, states, or countries if I so choose. I do this without being shot. I do this without the financial system crumbling around me, or the government invading my home. I do this without any brown person hurting me or taking my job. I do this without dying of cancer received from being scanned at the airport. Why is it that I’m able to move around so freely? What makes it so that I can seize the day without a gun on my side, or within arms reach? It is because I’ve chosen to seize the day from the fears I’ve been programmed with in the past, and from the possible futures these fears can dream up. I’ve seized the day for me. Not for what might be. It is my day. I get to decide. I get to enjoy it to its fullest, without any concern for tomorrow.

Replied to Blogging, small-b, Big B (W. Ian O'Byrne)
Currently, my main blog serves as a space for me to narrate my work, or think out loud. I see it as a machine where I consume, curate, and archive materials on my breadcrumbs site, synthesize each week in my newsletter, and then perhaps pull together the loose threads (as I see them) in posts on my blog…or elsewhere. All of these ideas are half-formed at best. They may go on to other things or spaces. As an example, bookmarks saved in the breadcrumbs often turn into blog posts. A series of blog posts have turned into keynotes or lectures. A collection are currently morphing into a book or two. But, all of these ideas are raw, and serve as pre-prints to work that may live later on, or always exist in their current format. When content turns into an article, publication, or other content outside of my main website, I usually bring it back to my spaces by providing a “Director’s Cut” version of my work that includes the Google Doc of the original draft or other insights.
There are times Ian when I wonder why I post what I do. Then there are moments like this, and also recently with another post, where the comments and interaction have really stretched my thinking.

I also really like your point about little beginnings leading to greater things. I have found that the more deliberate approach of using my blog for more, rather than social media, has led to more connections. Reminds me of Amy Burvall’s point about ‘gathering dust for stars.’

Bookmarked Better visions of ourselves: Human futures, user data, & The Selfish Ledger (W. Ian O'Byrne)
I think there is a reasoned response to technopanic. Perhaps a sense of technoagency is necessary. Now more than ever, faster than ever, technology is driving change. The future is an unknown, and that scares us. However, we can overcome these fears and utilize these new technologies to better equip ourselves and steer us in a positive direction.
Ian O’Byrne reflects on the internal video produced by Google Project X focusing on speculative design the notion of a ledger that does not actually belong to the user, but managed by some grand AI.

Although this was designed as a case of ‘what if’, it is a reminder of what could happen. It therefore provides a useful provocation, especially in light of Cambridge Analytica and GDPR. O’Byrne suggests that this is an opportunity to take ownership of our ledger, something in part captured by the #IndieWeb.

I agree with the thinking about this ledger, but do not agree with how it is situated in the video. I would see an opportunity for the individual to determine what information comes in to the ledger, and how it is displayed. As an example, each of the arrows coming pointing in to the ledger could be streams of information from your website, Twitter feed, Strava running app, and any other metrics you’d like to add. Each of these would come in with a modified read/write access, and sharing settings from the originating app/program/service. As the individual, you’d be in control of dictating what you present, and how you present this information in your ledger.

Interestingly, Douglas Rushkoff made the case in a recent episode of Team Human for including less not more on the ledger:

Replied to Too Long; Didn’t Read #150 (W. Ian O'Byrne)

Major depression is on the rise among Americans from all age groups, but is rising fastest among teens and young adults, new health insurance data shows.

So what is possibly behind the data? Possibly a mix of “how busy people are” in addition to time spent in front of screens, lack of community, isolation, and sleep disruption.

I am really interested in the posts of ‘friends’ and ‘depression’. I was really taken by Sarah Jeong’s recent reflection on leaving Facebook. One of the things that stood out from her discussion was the habits that we have lost or forgotten.

I sometimes feel bad about letting relationships lapse, but then I think that it takes two to tango. Really not sure. I think that the “True friends will stay in contact if you leave ” is an interesting one. Having wiped my Facebook content, I don’t agree. It can be easy to assume that others are still there, listening, watching, following, lurking. The irony with this is that even if we are active in such spaces, we are often at the whim of the algorithm.

It will be interesting to look back at the influence of technology on the current society. That is, to look at all the parts, such as change in work habits, family, society. Time will tell.

Bookmarked What is “Critical Literacy” in Education? (W. Ian O'Byrne)
Critical literacy is one of the key perspectives that informs my teaching, research, and thinking. It informs all of the work that I do, and fundamentally impacts everything from the ways in which I view the world, to the very tweets that I send out on a daily basis. It plays a role in guiding my research…I even built an entire digital literacy & education program based on the tenets of critical literacy.
Ian O’Byrne discusses the concept of critical literacy. This includes unpacking questions of truth and the dialetic critique. I really enjoy O’Byrne’s posts defining key elements in education, including empowerment and critical pedagogy. Another interesting approach to explanation is Amy Burvall’s ‘Creativity Tips’ series.
Replied to Issue #149 of the TL;DR Newsletter - rethinking the simple bare necessities. by (TLDR)
Interesting view from Tom Hulme of Google Ventures arguing that teaching kids to code isn’t the future proofed ticket to future jobs as framed by many people. Deep machine learning will likely automate the writing of code relatively quickly. Creativity is going to be far more important in a future where software can code better than we can.
Wondering Ian if ‘coding’ can actually be a part of creativity? In my current work, I need to think creatively to design a solution that can accommodate a number of scenarios and situations, while at the same time being relatively simple. For me, this is about working within the constraints. I may not know how to code my solutions, but I am not going to buy a future where I have no knowledge of the way things work. I work with too many people who think they can make decisions (creative or critical) without understanding the context at hand.
Bookmarked Switching up my signals (W. Ian O'Byrne)
This is not easy. This is not normal. This is a bit challenging as I’m forcing myself to redirect the streams that the social networks have made super simple for me (and others) to use over time. This is not easy as general users are conditioned to the sorts of signals, environments, and features that are rolled out over time. What I’m trying to do here will not make sense to most people who I interact with. This will confuse and possibly anger some f my followers. This may also cause many users to unfollow me, or (better yet) the algorithms on the social networks will just filter me out of the discussions.
Ian O’Byrne reflects on the signals that he shares online and his efforts to reclaim them with the creation of his own digital Commonplace Book. I too have gone down this path, exploring the many possibilities of the #IndieWeb. It is not a simple solution, however there is something about engaging in what Clay describes as ‘awkward workflows’. I like how O’Byrne’s post captures some of the wicked questions that this all poses, such as how do we share and which links do we use.
Replied to Viewing your life as a project (W. Ian O'Byrne)
Learning is a fundamental part of my philosophy and action. Through the acquisition of new knowledge I believe that we can understand and hopefully “change” most anything in our lives. This requires a continual examination of who you are, who you would like to be, and how you plan on getting there.
Ian, your discussion of projects has me rethinking the idea of ‘life-long learner’. I always find this a challenge in working out how to tell the story. Thinking of it as ‘life-long projects’ may offer some nuance. I can see how this sort of approach would also be helpful in regards to open badges.

In regards to your current project of engaging with the #IndieWeb, I came across this post recently from Cathie LeBlanc discussing her experiences with the IndieWeb:

I have spent the last five days working on my own web site (which I’ve owned for a long time) to IndieWebify it. Check it out at cathieleblanc.com. Be warned that I’m in the early stages of setting my IndieWeb site up so things will evolve. This work has inspired me and I’m sure I’ll be writing about these efforts and my thoughts about them as I move forward.

What it made me realise is that some bigger projects are ongoing. They are almost a mindset, a way of seeing, doing and thinking. There is always something else to be done. The challenge is to break it all down into its parts. I guess that is the point of calling out your goals on the #IndieWeb wiki. This might also be a part of what Greg McVerry is investigating in regards to ‘onboarding’.

I wonder if something like a ‘Now’ page might be useful for this? I like how Chris Aldrich also breaks it down. There is always something more.