Bookmarked Encountering harmful discourses in the classroom (W. Ian O'Byrne)

Howard C. Stevenson from Penn’s Graduate School of Education indicates three steps to address these harmful discourses as they enter your classroom.

  • Start with you – Process your own feelings, and address your own vulnerabilities before entering the classroom. Develop a support system with your colleagues. Practice – Classroom reactions usually happen in a split second. Prepare yourself for these instances by role-playing with colleagues in your building, or online with your PLN.
  • After an incident – Resist the urge to condemn the action or content. First try to understand the motivation if is disseminated through your classroom or building. Allow the school’s code of conduct to address instances where students actively spread this information. Strongly explain to students that these harmful discourses and the messages being spread about individuals and groups are not accepted. You will not accept the silencing of voices.
  • Keep talking – After these events, the best course of action is to keep talking. Difficult discussions will often ensue, but children and adults alike need to be able to process their feelings and reactions. This is an opportunity to shut down and be silent, or engage and promote change.
Ian O’Byrne discusses the challenges of engaging in harmful discourses. He provides some ways to responding, as well as a number of ways to be proactive. This touches on what danah boyd describes as the weaponisation of worldviews.
Replied to Making sense of teaching, learning, & assessing with technology (W. Ian O'Byrne)
educators claim to be digital literate, yet they still have basic questions about educational and instructional technologies. They continue to use the same technologies they learned previously, and have had success with. In the year 2000, being digitally literate meant that you could navigate a computer and use email. In the year 2018, there are many more technologies available to use, so would this definition still suffice? This raises the question of, what does it mean to teach, learn, and assess with technology? What will it mean to teach, learn, and assess with technology in the future?
I really liked the way that you break down the use of technology. Although I still find Belshaw’s digital literacies as a useful starting point for a deeper conversation. However, your differentiation between learning and teaching is a useful way of talking about context. I think it is also a reminder that technology is a system.

In the past I have used the Modern Learners Canvas to break down the various parts of learning and classroom.


“Modern Learning Canvas – Instructional Model” by mrkrndvs is licensed under CC BY-SA

Technology has a part to play, but it is never in isolation.

Lately, my take on educational technology has taken another twist. My focus lately has been on policy and the implication this has for technology and ‘efficency’. Whether it be reporting, timetables or attendance, what I am coming to realise is how much of this is assumed when it comes to instruction.

Would love your thoughts? I wonder if in ten years we will have more agile systems, that combine the rigour with the flexibility called for in today’s day and age?

Replied to Too Long; Didn’t Read #158 (W. Ian O'Byrne)
Each week when I write this newsletter, it is always interesting to me to see stories that suggest that social media is downright bad for us. For people that are hooked, it is like a drug. For people that don’t use social media and networks, they don’t understand why people care, or use these tools.
Ian, the irony of the JSON change is that I downloaded my content and cleaned it up months ago. Really hoping that someone develops an easy to use parser one day so that I can store all my statuses and check-ins in my site, even if they are private.
Replied to Too Long; Didn’t Read #157 (W. Ian O'Byrne)

Some computer science academics at Northeastern University ran an experiment testing over 17,000 of the most popular apps on Android to see if they’re collecting information and sending it back somewhere else. They found no evidence of an app unexpectedly activating the microphone or sending audio out when not prompted to do so. Like good scientists, they refuse to say that their study definitively proves that your phone isn’t secretly listening to you, but they didn’t find a single instance of it happening. Instead, they discovered a different disturbing practice: apps recording a phone’s screen and sending that information out to third parties.

I thought that it was just me with the strange feeling like I am being listened too. Really disconcerting that instead they are capturing images. This is a worry on multiple levels. That any semblance of privacy has seemingly left the building, but also the waste associated with collecting such data.

I am reminded of the discussion of a big data tax mentioned in Sabeel Rahman’s post The New Octopus. James Bridle also talks about the ‘Age of the Image’ in the New Dark Age:

As digital culture becomes faster, higher bandwidth, and more image-based, it also becomes more costly and destructive – both literally and figuratively. It requires more input and energy, and affirms the supremacy of the image – the visual representation of data – as the representation of the world.

Replied to Three examples of annotations, bookmarking, & sharing in my digital commonplace book (W. Ian O'Byrne)
For me, a breakthrough came when I posted a piece about Interviewing my digital domains. Chris Aldrich took the time to use Hypothesis to mark up my post and archive this all here. He then reflected on this use of highlights and marginalia. All of this had me thinking about opportunities to modify my process as detailed up above, to include Hypothesis to mark up and annotate posts, as opposed to just pulling quotes from the piece.
Thanks for sharing this Ian. I prefer Option 3 as it provides more options.
Replied to Too Long; Didn’t Read #156 (W. Ian O'Byrne)
I frequently find myself at the keyboard on my computer or mobile device and ready to fire off a rant, or targeted message. Yet, I find myself stopping, pausing, and deleting. I’ve recently thought about that as a sign of weakness. But, perhaps Sherri is pointing me (us) in a better direction.
I find myself being much more mindful of what I wrote when it is published from my own space. It feels less like a rental car where you care little about the various pops and clangs and more like a lease where you have more accountability for it. Is this listening or resistance or both, not sure, but it definitely feels more meaningful.
Bookmarked Possible cultural & technological futures of digital scholarship (W. Ian O'Byrne)
What I would like to see in this process is a way to connect the dots from the beginning to the end of the manuscript. Something open that allows the author to detail the path taken from the genesis of the piece to the end result. This would allow scholars to post grant funding statements, researcher notes, open data, revisions, and other materials and connect this to the overall result. Viewers of the final published version would be able to look back through the links and chain of documentation to see the work that was embedded in this resultant piece.
Ian O’Byrne discusses the use of the #IndieWeb technologies, such as webmentions and microformats, to document the pre-print process. This could include the use of a digital object identifier that could then be linked to the final peer reviewed publications.