Replied to Issue #119 of the TL;DR Newsletter - rethinking the simple bare necessities. by Ian O'Byrne (mailchi.mp)
TL;DR is a summary of all the great stuff I read so you don't have to...but I encourage it. Welcome to Issue #144. The Dalai Lama reminds us that "A lack of transparency results in distrust and a deep sense of insecurity."
Thanks Ian for the mention, thinking I should have put a bit more effort into the title of my post. Doesn’t exactly roll of the tongue. Glad you found it useful. There seems to be some complaints about SNAP, but I haven’t worked out the issue yet.

I am also in the process of adding my Facebook data to my site, however I think that is definitely a case of PESOS. This is all the otherside of the DoOO discussion.

Bookmarked The four types of online discussion. Where are you? by wiobyrne (W. Ian O'Byrne)
The four types of discussion found online can be used to identify the general tendencies individuals have as they communicate, comment, and react in online spaces. An individual may have a series of posts and comments that spread across multiple quadrants as they socialize and participate in online spaces. Yet, wherever there is a large concentration of messages on this model, that identifies the type of communication you generally engage in.

This matrix really has me thinking, especially about different contexts online. For example, with a Twitter chats, when you have different people meeting together with different intents (dialogue vs. debate), how is it that it works? Or does it?

Replied to Issue #119 of the TL;DR Newsletter - rethinking the simple bare necessities. by Ian O'Byrne (mailchi.mp)
My concern is not Google, Facebook, and others that I give my data...my concern is the unseen/unknown companies that buy my data. Also, keep in mind that your biggest concern (in the U.S.) should be your Internet Service Provider (ISP). They're sucking up your data, watching your searching/browsing habits, connecting this to your billing info, and selling/giving this off to everyone.
This is such an interesting topic Ian. I too have touched upon it in my newsletter. I agree with your point that there are bigger, dirtier parties at play within this area, I am just concerned about excluding the FANGS from the discussion.

I also wonder what ‘informed consent’ looks like in the future? I think improvements to the Terms and Conditions is only the beginning. It has me returning to Doug Belshaw’s elements:


“The 8 Essential Elements of Digital Literacies #digilit” by mrkrndvs is licensed under CC BY-SA

To be ‘informed’ surely is about having a deeper understanding of the way that technology and literacies work?

Liked Text tradeoffs as we move from print to pixel by wiobyrne (W. Ian O'Byrne)
A broadened view of text is needed to consider the various forms and modes of text in our world. These might include text in a printed book, a street sign, a video game, a YouTube video, an animated GIF, audio podcast, etc. We can no longer look at only one form of text as “correct”, and all other forms of reading and writing as not involving true literacy practices.
Replied to @mrkrndvs I've really been interested in the collection/curation I see from you & @chrisaldrich - I'm in the process of figuring out how to build up a WordPress site to serve as the by wiobyrnewiobyrne (Scholar Social)
@mrkrndvs I've really been interested in the collection/curation I see from you & @chrisaldrich - I'm in the process of figuring out how to build up a WordPress site to serve as the "commonplace book" on the WordPress site, keep it simple, and have it pump into my weekly newsletter. Any links/guida...
I agree with @ChrisAldrich about post kind plugins. Although I have more variants than the kinds provided, they offer a really good starting point.

Clint Lalonde Also wrote about the use of MailPoet To curate his newsletter. It doesn’t suit me at this point in time, but might suit you. Also, I think MailChimp allows you to collate via blog posts too? I assume that is what @dajbelshaw is doing with Thought Shrapnel.

Replied to Three steps to develop a system to take control of your passwords by Ian O'Byrne (W. Ian O'Byrne)
There are several things we need to assume as we work with digital tools. You will be hacked You may have already been hacked and don’t know it You will have to change your passwords quickly when you are hacked You will most likely have to change passwords often One the first steps in discussing privacy and security in online spaces usually involves your passwords. The challenge is that far too many of us have a...
Ian, I was recently caught up in a civil debate about password management. The question was why I did not simply store my passwords in Google. I said that it was my choice not to, but then got caught out not really having a reason why I did not store them within the browser.

I was wondering where that sat with your discussion of passwords and ‘security’. I raised the concern that storing passwords in Google was a lot of eggs to put in the one basket, but then isn’t that what happens with LastPass etc…

I am sure I am missing something here, just thought I would ask.

Replied to Memento Mori: Learning about life, by knowing you will die (W. Ian O'Byrne)
One of the things that I do believe, and most people do not understand, is that most of the wonderful things I have in my life are present because of my mother’s death. Most of my large family comes from my father remarrying. Events in my life have unfolded to put me in certain places in certain times.
Sorry to hear your loss Ian.

I really enjoyed your reflectoon. It has certainly led me to think a little more deeply. I was particularly taken by your point about your mother’s death defining you in so many ways. I think that can also be said about a lot of those life choices not just death. Being the grandson of a European refugee who fled Communist Czechoslovakia, I am often left wondering what if, only to realise that there is no what if, just what.

Thanks you again for sharing.

Aaron

Replied to Death is a friend of life by jennymackness (Jenny Connected)
Iain McGilchrist’s stress on the importance of poetry, music and presence at a time of the death of someone you love, or indeed of anyone, resonated with me. I am fortunate to know at least two people who really understand this. As many testified at her death, my mother was unique. Had she not existed there would be a Betty-shaped hole in the Universe.
My sincere condolences Jenny. Sadly, death seems to be a topic of reflection at the moment.

Your post has me reflecting on the death of my mother. Although it maybe a part of life, I am not sure I was willing to accept death. I naively thought she would be around seemingly forever. I remember missing our last moment together:

My last real one to one chat happened when I was least expecting it. With my step dad out picking up my brother and sister from school, I had a few moments with my mum. All of the sudden the tone of the conversation changed from being chatty, talking about this and that, but nothing in particular, to being more serious. I am not sure if it was something that I said or whether it was something that mum was just waiting to say, but she learnt forward from the couch and told me that I was a great brother, an amazing son and a fantastic husband and that I should not listen to anyone who says otherwise. In my usual manner, I tried to dodge these compliments. Like my mum, I just don’t like being pumped up. However, it didn’t occur to my till much later that these were mum’s last meaningful words for me. Although we had a few more conversations, none of them were as deep as this moment.

I am not sure how I thought she would pass, but no-one and definitely no movie prepared me the change and transformation associated with cancer.

I find your mention of music interesting. My sister and I played Miley Cyrus’ The Climb over and over in our last night with my mother as she lay there slowing passing. I remember the track playing randomly on my phone in class one day. I had to check myself, let alone somehow explain why I had Miley Cyrus on my phone to a bunch of teens.

Thank you Jenny for sharing.

Aaron

Bookmarked “Tell me about yourself” in a critical auto-ethnography (W. Ian O'Byrne)
In my language and literacy courses, I have students critically reflect on their identity, and the pathways that brought them to this point in their lives. They research and write an “auto-ethnography” which becomes an analytic, multimodal portrait of one or some of their literacy learning experiences, placed within social, historical, cultural context. It should go beyond summary and autobiography to incorporate ethnographic analysis of the cultural contexts and practices, relationships, dynamics of power, etc.
Ian O’Byrne documents the structure that he uses in getting his students to write auto-ethnographies. Along with Curt Rees model and Naomi Barnes’ post, they offer a useful place to start when considering the topic.