Liked How to Make Students Care About Writing by Kristina Rizga (The Atlantic)
McKamey argues that the most important skill for a teacher is his or her ability to build trust with a student, which develops when students can sense that the educator is willing to hear their ideas, thoughts, and musings despite their challenges with grammar, low grades, or test scores in previous classes. This doesn’t mean that teachers need to cushion their feedback with fake praise, but it does mean, she thinks, that schools should help teachers develop skills to recognize what all students, including those who might be considered “low achieving,” do in their classrooms—instead of focusing mostly on what they don’t do or know.
According to Pirette McKamey too much feedback on writing is based on personality, rather than what is actually written on the page. What is important then is building trust and believing in every student. This approach reminds me of the wider strengths-based learning approach.
Liked "The Audrey Test": Or, What Should Every Techie Know About Education? (Hack Education)
If I were to really formalize such an "Audrey test," I think it would also have to involve what you know, what you think about education, about teaching, about learning, about politics and theory and practice -- its history, its present, its future.
Via Maha Bali
Liked 12 Leadership Development Questions Any Leader Can Use Today by Dan Rockwell (Leadership Freak)

One secret of leadership development is providing time for others to engage in self-reflection.

  1. What do you already know? How might that apply to current challenges?
  2. What are you doing that makes you feel energized? What does that say about you?
  3. What makes you feel connected with people? What blocks connection?
  4. When do you feel most powerful? Anxious? Successful?
  5. What is your role – not title – on the team? In your organization?
  6. What’s confusing? Where do you need greater clarity, simplicity, or focus?
  7. What do your hobbies say about you? How does that inform your leadership journey?
  8. What frustrates you?
  9. What are you reluctant to try?
  10. How might you maximize your strengths?
  11. Who on your team should you be developing? How?
  12. Who has helped you on your leadership journey? How are you different because of them?
Liked Obsessions and change by https://colinwalker.blog/Colin%20Walker.png Colin Walkerhttps://colinwalker.blog/Colin%20Walker.png Colin Walker (colinwalker.blog)
My mind is already racing with the possibilities of what I could write or do with my next obsession but this spark is tempered by the knowledge that, in six months or a year, it could have burnt out, exhausted. I face it with a good dose of trepidation but know I'll dive in all the same, consumed by a passion, blinkered to almost all else.
Replied to Doug Belshaw on Mastodon (Mastodon)
I don’t really pay much attention to the ‘format’ of a newsletter, I am more interested in the person and the story told. I love the personal nature of Laura Hilliger’s rambling reflections and the structured collections provided by Ian O’Byrne. I am sometimes sceptical of newsletters which are really means of summary and self-promotion. I think that Austin Kleon is someone who gets that balance right.
Replied to Maths in Motion by FH (technologylearningjourney)
My planning this term has been fairly slack given that I’ve been so sick and there’s nothing worse than being sick at home and trying to plan lessons.
Fiona, I love your honesty with this reflection. So often when it comes to technology it involves using some other time to prepare for a lesson. This is not always feasible and as you demonstrate, not always sustainable.