Listened Cory Doctorow, Meet the Writers 123 - Radio from Monocle
The British-Canadian journalist and author – co-founder of ‘Boing Boing’, one of the most influential blogs in the world – talks about his vision for our digital world.


Cory Doctorow talks about his education, growing up with mainframes, the consumption of news and engaging with others,

Some interesting quotes:

On Succeeding in Technology

If you really want a good job in tech then you should have the good fortune of being born in 1971 … Anyone who is my age who made a living in technology just got lucky by when they were born.

Paying for the Product

They say if you are not paying for that you are the product, what we see in an era of unregulated monopolism is that people who are paying for it are still the product. You buy an iPhone or an Android Phone and it is loaded with survellieance technology … If you are a farmer and you drive your 1/2 million dollar John Deer tracker around your fields, it is gathering telemtery on your fields … Monsanto takes that data and sells it back to you in seed, while John Deer takes that data and sells it to the futures market.

People Are Free, not the Internet

The internet does not want to be free, people do.

Riding the Highs and Lows

It does not matter how delicious the punch is if there is a turd floating in the punch bowl

via Chris Aldrich

Bookmarked I Read One Book 100 Times Over 10 Years… Here Are 100 Life-Changing Lessons I Learned by Ryan Holiday (Medium)
All the things that people do hallucinogens to explore, you can also do while sober as a judge. It just takes work.
Ryan Holiday reflects on the impact of Marcus Aurelius’ Mediation in light of his new book, The Daily Stoic. One of the interesting points Holiday discusses is the influence of translation:

All we have now are translations of translations — no original writing from his hand survives. It all could have been arranged in an entirely different format originally (Did all the books have titles originally — as the first two do? Are those titles made up? Were they all numbered originally? Or were even the breaks between thoughts added in by a later translator?)

This comes back to the work of Walter Benjamin and the Task of the Translator.

Another idea that he discusses is the ability to explore a side of life that many assume is only possible through the use of drugs. He explains that this just takes effort. This reminds me of Jack Antonoff’s avoidance of drugs:

Drugs spin certain wheels in your head that are already spinning

Liked Why It's Important To Bring Blogging Back Now More Than Ever (Anouska)
It’s time to bring the blogs BACK. If you like the content you see from bloggers, take the time to check out their blog. If you have a blog, don’t be discouraged. Keep writing. Keep creating. Because at the end of the day, Instagram is only a social media platform. It will be replaced by the next big thing. But as long as you look after your little corner of the internet, no app can take that away from you.
Replied to Time to get back into this blogging thing (My Thoughts...)
I realised the other day that I haven’t blogged for some time and started to reflect on why this journey of sharing my learning and my thoughts began. A number of years back I encountered som…
Great to have you back in the blogosphere Donelle. Not sure we ever stop learning about this blogging thing. Leaving the classroom has been interesting in regards to writing and reflecting. However, I always love learning so there is always something.

📓 First Gutenberg Experience

I decided to finally install the Gutenberg plugin. I have read a few posts (Jeff Everhart and John Johnston) and realised that I probably should have a look.

My first impression was that it felt like the WordPress.com editor. I can see the appeal of blocks, it works for the new Google Sites and Weebly, but fear that it is overkill for what I do? I also noticed that Post Kinds disappeared.

Interestingly, in the screen providing a summary of all the posts, there is an option for starting a new post in the Gutenberg editor or the classic editor. Maybe this choice is an eye to the future, just wonder if there is a means of making ‘classic’ as default?


Some other reflections:

Replied to Microcast- Back In class by john john (John's World Wide Wall Display)
Some rather belated thoughts on returning to classroom teaching.
This is an interesting reflection John. Going back into the classroom is something that I aspire to do one day, but I fear how much muscle memory I may have lost. My saving grace is that my wife is a teacher and she keeps me grounded … Or at least tries.
Replied to Reducing friction by Mark Mark (mpospese.com)
What I’m doing is not exactly POSSE because status posts under 280 characters are cross-posted to Twitter as plain tweets and don’t link back here, but that’s fine by me. I don’t care if Twitter has copies of my photos and words as long as I have the originals hosted here on my blog. I downsized from two blogs to one, and now instead of tweeting, I publish status posts to my blog (which get cross-posted to Twitter). I mostly use micro.blog’s iOS app for status posts, but any WordPress-compatible client would work.
Interestingly, I actually went from one to two in my transition to the Indieweb. I wanted to leave my main blog, Read Write Respond, for my longer posts, while I use Read Write Collect for everything else. I must admit that I am progressively consolidating more and more of my disparate parts.

I am intrigued by the idea of relying on micro.blogs to manage comments. Treating it like that reminds me a little of Disqus.

Bookmarked How to Write an Edu-book (The Confident Teacher)
I wanted to share my own edu-bookery. It is important to state that for me, regular blogging and writing separate to a book is an excellent mental work-bench for writing a book, offering me the discipline needed to write habitually and at length. Still, my book writing process is really quite specific and I have fell upon a helpful habit in writing my latest book.
Alex Quigley discusses his six steps to writing a book:

  1. Coin an idea and chapter structure
  2. Delve into the research
  3. Review the notes
  4. Transfer notes to seperate word files
  5. Write the book
  6. Draft and edit

In addition to the reflections from Mary Myatt, Tom Sherrington and Ryan Holiday, they offer a useful insight into the writing process. It is interesting to compare these with the process often taught in schools. So often students get straight into writing without giving time to the initial planning process.

Liked Mulling Time by Emily Fintelman (Mrs Fintelman Teaches)
The topic of what good professional learning looks like is always contentious. Some of us love to sit and listen and soak up some new knowledge from a great speaker. Others argue that the best professional learning happens in schools with colleagues through inquiry, observation and dialogue. I thin...
Liked Give up or Go up by Lyn (lynhilt.com)
So maybe I’ll focus, instead, on Go Up goals and Give Up goals. Like Seth says in his post, people are generally happy to help you with your give up goals. They’ll remind you to drink less, exercise more, and spend less money. My 2018 give up goals might include be less lazy on the exercise front and eat fewer carbs for breakfast. I’ll try to give up working on a device when my kids are present. I’ll fail, but I’ll try. I’ll give up taking jobs that don’t compensate my worth.