Liked Give up or Go up by Lyn (lynhilt.com)
So maybe I’ll focus, instead, on Go Up goals and Give Up goals. Like Seth says in his post, people are generally happy to help you with your give up goals. They’ll remind you to drink less, exercise more, and spend less money. My 2018 give up goals might include be less lazy on the exercise front and eat fewer carbs for breakfast. I’ll try to give up working on a device when my kids are present. I’ll fail, but I’ll try. I’ll give up taking jobs that don’t compensate my worth.
Replied Finding my Fingers; A Few Learning Stories by Robert Schuetz (rtschuetz.net)
A blog about learning supported by innovation and social networks.
I found your discussion intriguing Bob.

When I think back to my schools (and university days) I feel a strange sense of guilt about the time that I (probably) wasted. What difference did I really make?

I think that as a learner I have a tendency to dive in. I probably commit myself far too much at the expense of other, maybe. I was struck once by this quote from Sartre:

When we say that man chooses himself, we do mean that every one of us must choose himself; but by that we also mean that in choosing for himself he chooses for all men.

I am always eager about what I do and how it could make a difference. Take for example my recent dive into #IndieWeb. This is driven by a curiosity about what might be and possibly how things could be better.

Thanks as always for your provocations,

Aaron

Bookmarked Should Your Class Or Student Blogs Be Public Or Private? by Kathleen Morris (The Edublogger)
A dilemma that faces many educators new blogging is the question of whether they should be publishing their students’ information and work online. They might wonder if their class or student blogs should be public for anyone to see, or private for a limited audience (or no one) to view.
Kathleen Morris unpacks the benefits of both private and public blogs. She provides a number of arguments with evidence to support. This is particularly pertinent to schools and educators.

Edublogs on Private vs Public

Personally, when I supported classroom blogs they were closed as I was not comfortable that everyone who needed to be was fully aware of the consequences. I think though that Kin Lane’s advice on APIs can be applied, approach everything as if it is public even if it is not.

Bookmarked Founding a Startup, Just One More Time – Ben Werdmuller – Medium by Ben Werdmuller (Medium)
Knowing what I know now, from the founders I work with, my background in startups, and what I’ve learned from working at a values-based accelerator: if I was to do it all again, what choices would I make?
Ben Werdmuller reflects on his experiences with three different startups and provides a number of lessons he has learnt along the way. These include starting by getting your feet wet, working out how far you can go without going full-time, identifying who else might be needed for the journey, which ownership structure will work best, how you will build the solution and who will buy it.
Replied METAMORPHOSIS and emerging from the chrysalis: #oneword2018 by Dr Deborah Netolicky (the édu flâneuse)
METAMORPHOSIS is also about letting go. It is about shedding old skins, old bodies, old habits, old values, old dreams. It is about considering what I want to take into my next decade, and what I’m willing to leave behind.
I love the way in which a single word can be used to tie a bunch of desperate parts together, even more so, your words over time really tell a story. I really struggled to think of a word this year. I related to some of the points that you made about change and really liked the idea of metamorphosis. I feel like it is something that we are always doing, but not necessarily aware of or willing to give the time to.

Imagine a technology world that’s more intrusive, more prone to failure, and more powerful.  We access the internet in ways that compromise our privacy, make us vulnerable to threats, and divide us from each other. Bryan Alexander

I was recently offered a voucher for free parking in the city, all I had to do was sign up. This led me to think about why we take up technology and at what cost.

Replied Read Write Collect | Aaron Davis (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
I’ve been following Aaron Davis for a while at Read Write Respond, but today I noticed a whole new part of his online presence at Read Write Collect that I’ve been missing all along!
Chris, your bookmark encouraged me to clarify my purpose and intent for developing another site. Like Michael Bishop, I think that the answer to my online presence is in having two distinct spaces, one for my long form posts and the other a collection of my presence on the web. I can see the benefit in consolidating everything into one space, as you do or better using a platform like Known, however it is working for now.
Replied Why would you post on a blog? by Ann Rooney (The Possibility Post)
The Possibility Post is a global digital journal and portfolio that demonstrates who I am as a teacher and as a learner.
This is a useful reflection Ann, outlining some of the benefits to keeping a journal, such as organising resources, documenting the learning and reflecting on practice. I think that one of the challenges that I have grappled with are the technical aspects. You talk about collecting resources. I think that the challenge to anyone starting out is thinking about how you structure such a space. Here tags and categories are so important. This I like about the features associated with the indieweb is that it offers more functionality, such as post kinds (a development on the post formats). For example, replies or audio. However, even these have their limits, as each post can only have one format.

Wondering Ann if you have written or reflected anywhere on the technical features and constraints that you work with? I do notice that you mention the standards? I never went down that path.

Replied Audience Doesn’t Matter by Bill Ferriter
Audience is a function of the content that you create, the consistency of your creation patterns, the length of time that you’ve been creating, the opportunities that you have to be in front of audiences in the real world, the relationships that you have with people who have audiences larger than you do — and, as frustrating as it may seem, serendipity.
Great reflection Bill. I think that it is easy to be distracted by clicks and likes. I remember when I first started blogging, I thought that I was going to get inundated. The shock was that I almost had to beg for my first comment. I think that in part the Blogger user interface encourages a focus on statistics. I find that the fact you have make a choice to setup Jetpack means that at the very least users are more mindful of the impact and choice. When I moved to WordPress I also made the decision to stop checking the stats. I think that I have only randomly checked Jetpack a handful of time in the last few years.

In regards to “hits’ and ‘likes’, you might enjoy reading this post from danah boyd (although I assume that you have probably stumbled upon it before). She provides a different perspective on data and numbers:

Stats have this terrible way of turning you — or, at least, me — into a zombie. I know that they don’t say anything. I know that huge chunks of my Twitter followers are bots, that I could’ve bought my way to a higher Amazon ranking, that my Medium stats say nothing about the quality of my work, and that I should not treat any number out there as a mechanism for self-evaluation of my worth as a human being.

The only thing that I am unsure about is that by my nature of ‘responding’ I often have someone in mind associated with my writing and reflection, is this though a different sort of ‘audience’?

via collect.readwriterespond.com

Replied October 6, 2017 by Clive (Clive Thompson)
The story of why I’m @pomeranian99
Clive, I was intrigued by the story of how you came to your username. I had a similar story of confusion in choosing ‘mrkrndvs’. As an educator, many misinterpret it as ‘Mr Krndvs’ but soon get tongue tide. It is in fact my name without vowels, which is not so obvious as I do not go by my first name.

I was signing up for a Hotmail account sometime in the early 00’s and somewhere in the terms and conditions I misread that you would have to pay for a proper name. I therefore came up with ‘mrkrndvs’ as an alternative. I assume in hindsight that the ‘cost’ was probably in reference to purchasing a custom domain

Thankfully, I have long forgotten the other iterations of online usernames I used in those halcyon days. I do get pressure now and then to take on a more ‘professional’ username, but for me it is a part of the story of who I am. I feel that I have come to fit it overtime.