Bookmarked Instagram makes me anxious (discursive.adamprocter.co.uk)
I get anxious when in real life friends don’t like an Instagram photo of mine, especially if it related to work I’m undertaking, I wonder why they didn’t spend 2 seconds pressing the heart, did they even see my photo? Don’t they know I like to get, well a like. It makes me worry. Sometimes...
Adam, this reminds me of Bill Ferriter’s questions about audience and Harold Jarche’s discussion of metrics. I very rarely look at my analytics. What I do is for me firstly, that others may benefit is a bonus of the open web. As Maha Bali points out:

I first fell in love with the web or the open aspect of the web when I was trying to finish my PhD during a time where Egypt had a lot of political conflict and I was unable to leave the house because I had a young child and the library at my institution was closed. I needed some resources, and even though I had access to some online resources, I actually needed some paper based resources that did not exist for free online, and at the time, what I fell in love with was green open access stuff that was placed on repositories, and honestly pirated stuff, that was placed online so that I had some access to some articles and book chapters that I wouldn’t normally be able to access from home. And it was that transformative moment for me where I decided that if I publish things, I would like as much as possible for the things that I publish to be openly accessible to other people.

Listened Taking the time to be offline by Dean Pearman from Design and Play
In our first real episode for 2018, we revisit the importance of offline time and switching off. This is always a challenge when work is something you are incredibly passionate about. How do we develop good work habits when the lines are blurred so much? We explore the third space, a concept developed by Adam Fraser designed to help people transfer better between work and space. We once again circle back on time tracking and managing our time. We explore the value of what to measure when tracking time. Steve explains his tracking of interruptions and the use of reticular activation to intentionally manage his focus and habits. We talk about the books we read and those that just couldn’t bring ourselves to read (#blurredlines). This leads to a rich discussion on real evidence of learning and design thinking as a mental model. Student centred learning features as Dean explores his school’s new Inspire Me curriculum and the removal of the curriculum safety net.
Replied to On the Need for Phone Free Classrooms by Pernille Ripp (pernillesripp.com)
I know that I have pushed the use of phones in our classrooms before on this blog, how I have written about using them purposefully, but I will no longer subscribe to the notion that when kids use their phones it is only because they are bored. It is too easy to say that if teachers just created relevant and engaging lessons then no child would use their phones improperly in our rooms. That’s not it, all of us with devices have had our attention spans rewired to constantly seek stimulus. To instantly seek something other than what we are doing. To constantly seek something different even if what we are doing is actually interesting. And not because what we seek out is so much better, look at most people’s Snapchat streaks and you will see irrelevant images of tables and floors and half faces simply to keep a streak alive. It is not that our students are leaving our teaching behind at all times because they are bored, it is more because many of us, adults and children alike, have lost the ability to focus on anything for a longer period of time.
Pernille, you might be interested in a Douglas Rushkoff’s recent reflection at the beginning of a Team Human episode. He wonders why is it so easy for people to lose sight of the design and purpose behind these platforms? He argues that other than teaching media, social media (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram etc) should never be used by schools. I think that this crosses over to the smartphone debate.
Bookmarked Thirteen and Insta-famous: How Aussie tweens are 'brand-managing' themselves (ABC News)
You definitely do need to have two accounts, says Meika Woolard, a 13-year-old with 335,000 Instagram followers. She is one of Australia's most prominent teen Insta-influencers, and part of a growing trend of users harnessing the power of multiple accounts.
This touches on piece in Boing Boing highlighting that young people do not want a single identity. Uses of social media like this has me thinking about the way that IndieWeb and Domain of One’s Own centralise identities. Is this something unique to social media? Is this a limit of the ‘Rel=me’ approach?

You don’t have to be “protech” or “anti-tech.” Indeed, it’s hard to imagine how someone could realistically be said to be “anti-tech” – your future is going to have more technology in it, so the question isn’t, “Should we use technology?” but rather, “Which technology should we use?” – Cory Doctorow

I attended a ‘cyber-safety’ session that suggested joining students in online social spaces. Beyond concerns with taking away another space for young people, I wonder if the solution is not saying no to technology and social media, but to provide a compelling alternative?

Liked Publishers and Platforms Need to Label Genres. Now, Please. by mikecaulfield (Hapgood)
It’s true that people do like having a standard interface for the feed, but the feed needs to figure out ways to parse this information and add the genre labels and indicators back in ... The fact that it is 2018 and we’re still having this conversation is bizarre
Bookmarked Social Inequality Will Not Be Solved By an App by Safiya Umoja Noble (WIRED)
The entire experiment of the internet is now with us, yet we do not have enough intense scrutiny at the level of public policy on its psychological and social impact on the public.
In an excerpt from Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism, Safiya Umoja Noble highlights the part that technology plays in reinstating inequality and oppression. This is a topic that Cathy O’Neil touches on in her book Weapons of Maths Destruction. One point that stood out was the ability to use algorithms to find the ‘best’ school:

These data-intensive applications that work across vast data sets do not show the microlevel interventions that are being made to racially and economically integrate schools to foster educational equity. They simply make it easy to take for granted data about “good schools” that almost exclusively map to affluent, White neighborhoods. We need more intense attention on how these types of artificial intelligence, under the auspices of individual freedom to make choices, forestall the ability to see what kinds of choices we are making and the collective impact of these choices in reversing decades of struggle for social, political, and economic equality. Digital technologies are implicated in these struggles.

Another introduction to Noble’s book is her video, found here.

Bookmarked metrics, thy name is vanity (jarche.com)
About a year ago I deleted Google Analytics from this website. I no longer know where visitors come from, what they find interesting, or what they click on. This has liberated my thinking and I believe has made my writing a bit better. I always wrote for myself but I would regularly peak at my statistics. Was my viewership going up? What did people read? How did they get there? What search terms were people using? — Who cares? There are a lot of numbers that ‘social media experts’ will tell you to maximize. But there are few that make any difference.
Harold Jarche reflects on turning Google Analytics off. He instead suggests that the metric that matters (for him) is how many books he sells and how many people sign upmto his courses. He gives the example of a course that had hundreds of likes and reposts, yet only one person signed up. This has me thinking about which metric matters to me and the way in which I engage with other people’s ideas and projects. This is particularly pertinent to my focus on intent.
Bookmarked Twitter Health Metrics Proposal Submission (blog.twitter.com)
We are looking to partner with outside experts to help us identify how we measure the health of Twitter, keep us accountable to share our progress with the world and establish a way forward for the long-term ... We believe that we can identify indicators of conversational health that are even more specific to Twitter and its impact.
I wonder what they plan to do if they find out they are having a negative impact? I wonder if this is ‘bad faith’ or simply an illustration of what is possible, in the same way that Hapara demonstrates the possibilities of GSuite.