Bookmarked Disengaged boys: just make it a competition, right? by Adam Boxer (A Chemical Orthodoxy)
When students are involved in a competition, the thing they are focused on is the competition. Their mental energies are dedicated to finding the quickest, easiest and most effortless way of winning the competition. Thinking hard or learning plays second fiddle. The mind has a remarkable capacity to shirk the hard labour of learning, don’t give it another opportunity to do so.
Adam Boxer questions the benefits of competition and urgency on learning. This reminds me of a post from Natasha Singer on Kahoot!:

Kahoot seems like a bit of a throwback to a more old-fashioned pedagogical approach: behaviorism. This is the idea of educators shaping student behavior by handing out gold stars, stickers, points and the like.

To me it comes back to fun or hard fun. The most useful activity I did with quizzes in class was to get my students to create their own and upload them for their peers.

Liked Andrew Gaff deserves his ban, but the AFL has a bigger problem with off-field violence | Kate O'Halloran by Kate O’Halloran (the Guardian)
Why, then, does a violent act between two men on a football field draw such ire, while ex-footballers who are convicted of violence against women rarely face such outcry, or worse, are welcomed back into the AFL fold with open arms?
Bookmarked Is it time for the women’s game to break free from AFL’s shackles? | Kate O'Halloran by Kate O’Halloran (the Guardian)
Women must say no when the AFL refuses to play fair, as tennis players did in the 1970s
Kate O’Halloran reports on the proposed changes to AFLW. In addition to a second article accounting Susan Alberti’ response, O’Halloran compares with the response of women’s tennis in the 70’s and that we may need to go backwards in order to break new ground.
Liked On Boy Books and Girl Books by Pernille Ripp (Pernille Ripp)

So I am wondering if we for once and for all, can we all agree that there is no such thing as a girl or a boy book?  That kids need to be exposed to characters that inspire them, no matter their gender.  That kids need to be exposed to characters that will expand their worldviews and invite them into new worlds that they knew little of before, no matter their gender.  That kids need to be exposed to great books, without us adults thinking that they will only read a certain type of book based on what we see in front of us.

We must give them a chance to experience more than what they are.  Books allow us to do just that, but not if they never read them.  Not if we never recommend them.  That’s on us, which means we can change it, so let’s do that starting now.

Liked ‘We believed we could remake ourselves any way we liked’: how the 1990s shaped #MeToo – podcast by Eve Fairbanks (the Guardian)
While promising liberation and endless possibility, the culture of the decade drove us relentlessly in pursuit of perfection
Eve Fairbanks’ reflection on the creation of the MeToo movement reminds me of Molly Ringwald’s look back at the art of John Hughes.

Read the text version here.

Liked Feeds and Gardens by Kathleen FitzpatrickKathleen Fitzpatrick (Kathleen Fitzpatrick)
... Finding ways to be open to the web while safe from harassment; finding ways to maintain ownership of one’s content while being open to discussion; finding ways to develop and extend community without endangering the very thing we’re trying to create. Finding ways to care for one’s plot, in other words, without winding up in a walled garden. I’m looking forward to seeing how a decentralized, distributed, interconnected web might find new ways to approach these challenges.
Bookmarked Incredibles 2 boosts working mothers – at the expense of stay-home dads | Hanna Flint by Hanna Flint (the Guardian)
As the film and television industry works harder to create female characters that are more representative of today’s working women, it’s time they gave working dads the same sort of treatment. Maybe that would help to dispel the stigma that stops so many men taking paternity leave, or help them to feel secure in earning less than their partners in order to spend more time looking after their children. Mums are superheroes, but dads like mine are too. Incredibles 2 does them a disservice – let’s give them a bit more credit.
I really enjoyed the second installment of Incredibles, but the setup of Mr Incredible as ironically pathetic is a little bit frustrating. This is all to common and I agree with Hanna Flint that we need something more.