Bookmarked Why We Forget Most of the Books We Read (The Atlantic)
To me, it doesn’t seem like narcissism to remember life’s seasons by the art that filled them—the spring of romance novels, the winter of true crime. But it’s true enough that if you consume culture in the hopes of building a mental library that can be referred to at any time, you’re likely to be disappointed. Books, shows, movies, and songs aren’t files we upload to our brains—they’re part of the tapestry of life, woven in with everything else. From a distance, it may become harder to see a single thread clearly, but it’s still in there.
Julie Beck discusses reading and suggests that unless we do something with it within 24-hours then it often disappears. Associated with this, she recommends reading more slowly if we are to take them in. This builds on Ryan Halliday’s point to do something with what you read. I am also left wondering about the connections with digital literacies to support this.
Bookmarked Some Small Ideas to Help Students Self-Select Books Better by Pernille Ripp (pernillesripp.com)
I was asked this morning on Twitter how we move students beyond wanting hand-picked recommendations every time they book shop. How do they move beyond needing someone, typically, the adult or trusted reading role model to help them find the next book to read?
Pernille Ripp lists the things that she does to move students from hand-picked books:

  • We build our libraries, both whole school and classroom libraries.
  • We carefully craft our book displays.
  • We have a to-be-read list.
  • We book talk books almost every day.
  • We do lessons on how to book shop.
  • We just say no.
  • We dive into their reading identity.
  • We read every single day in class.

This continues on from an earlier post discussing reading programs

Bookmarked On Which Reading Program to Purchase by Pernille Ripp (pernillesripp.com)
I was recently asked if I could give a 2-minute answer to which reading program would be best for a district. While I was flummoxed at first; 2 minutes, that’s not enough time to discuss the needed components?! I quickly realized that I really don’t need even two minutes to answer this question ...
In a recent post, Pernille Ripp addresses which reading program to choose. Rather than listing a range of programs, she provides a list of what should be included:

So what should we look for instead?

A program that supports choice, independent reading time, small group, one on one conferring, as well as lessons for ideas.

A program that focuses on the needs of the individual as much as the needs of the group.

A program that leaves teachers and students alike that reading and being a reader is something good.

A program that builds hope for all readers to be readers.  That balances out between reading for skill and reading for pleasure.  A program with an emphasis on developing reader identity as well as reader skill.  A program that doesn’t kill the love of reading but instead bolsters it.

That is the program you should buy.  And then don’t ever forget that fidelity should always remain to the students and not to the program itself to quote my Assistant Superintendent, Leslie Bergstrom.

I think that listing all of the different influences and attributes is so important. I have spoken about this elsewhere in regards to EdTech, using the Modern Learning Canvas to illustrate it. I have had a quick go at translating Ripp’s ideas here:

Modern Learning Canvas is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License.

Click here to make your own copy of the canvas

Liked The Shape of Stories by Alex Quigley (The Confident Teacher)
When our students read and write they draw upon their knowledge of stories – sometimes consciously, sometimes unconsciously. The language and words and patterns become known and understood, matched and linked together. Over time, students develop what we can term a ‘mental model‘. That is to say, the more we read, the more we understand, the more we develop a ‘model’ of different types of stories and their respective worlds. We know that the earlier we read, and the greater the volume of our reading, the more fine grained and precise our ‘mental model’. For many children who join school, they are well on the way with being read to and the shape of stories – mental models – are already emerging in their minds. By secondary school, I can teach a gothic story, but most students could write a good attempt with little to no teaching. The shape of the story is already well formed in their minds.
Liked Reading a Book is The Answer (kinlane.com)
Reading a book is the answer for a lot of what troubles me. When I’ve had to much screen time–read a book! When I’m tired from work and want to turn on the TV–read a book. When I’m frustrated with the current state of things in this country–read a book. When I can’t shut down the voices in my head because I’m spinning out about something–read a book.
Replied Pocket 2017 Year in Review (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
According to Pocket, I’m still in their top 5% of their readers/users despite the fact that I cut way back on using it this past year in strong deference to using other feed readers including one built into my website. Apparently I read 678, 617 words in their app this year which according to the...
Apparently I am in the Top 1%. I must admit that I have come to use it more now that you can play posts. What I find intriguing is what they measure ‘reading’ as and how they decided that it was like reading 35 books. It actually made me wonder if there are many people actually using Pocket anymore?