Listened What oil companies knew: the great climate cover-up – podcast from the Guardian

Author Bill McKibben on how industry lobbying created 30-year barrier to tOil firms are said to have known for decades of the link between burning fossil fuels and climate breakdown. Author Bill McKibben describes how industry lobbying created a 30-year barrier to tackling the crisis.ackling crisis.

Replied to Building the Brexit party: how Nigel Farage copied Italy’s digital populists (the Guardian)

Casaleggio was far ahead of other political parties in using this data to help shape Five Star’s messaging, which he fed back to supporters through Grillo’s blog, and increasingly through social media. The very tools that were supposedly giving members control over the movement were allowing Casaleggio to exert control over them. With a thoughtfully crafted blogpost, he could intervene in the movement’s internal debates, bolstering certain positions and dampening others down.

I always wondered how Mark Zuckerberg for president would ever work, I would assume that this might be an example.
Liked It may yet turn out that this was a good election to have lost

In a year’s time, if it has put the stench of one of the most inept campaigns in Australian political history behind it, Labor may be empowered to ask some pointed questions – and possibly dream of a reversal in its fortunes.

It may even be in a position to “burn’’ Morrison politically, if not biblically.

Bookmarked Triumph holds an epic warning for Morrison by an author (ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation))

Naturally, Labor’s shock loss has left the party reeling. But Scott Morrison, too, should heed the warning it sends for his party’s third term.

Annabel Crabb explains that Australia is actually very much the same as it was before the election. The reason for the ferocity of response is simply expectation. Labor tried to do too much. It tried to change the government and get a mandate for massive change at the same time. Crabb explains that in the last 50 years there have been five similar attempts, with only Whitlam in 1972 being successful. On the flip side, three of the governments that survived against the odds were gone at the next election. As Ross Gittins’ has also touched on, Morrison now has the challenge of putting together an agenda that was largely missing during his campaign.
Listened

Brian Eno discusses the body and character of speakers and instruments on space and sound. In the process he summarises his work with generative music. The conversation soon moves to politics, capitalism, neo-liberalism and taking action.

You cannot do technology now without a political position.

Eno ends by sharing an interesting idea of a developing a backwards calendar to plan your life based on how long you think you have left to live.

via Austin Kleon

Liked Anand Giridharadas interview: Why elite philanthro-capitalists do more harm than good (New Statesman)

Giridharadas sardonically remarked of the UK: “They’re having a fight about the wall except the wall is the English Channel: half of these people want to turn the English Channel into a wall to keep out their version of the Mexicans.”

Liked Opinion | The Writer Who Destroyed an Empire (nytimes.com)

All this would give the writer great satisfaction. But though feted and exploited by questionable allies, Solzhenitsyn should be remembered for his role as a truth-teller. He risked his all to drive a stake through the heart of Soviet communism and did more than any other single human being to undermine its credibility and bring the Soviet state to its knees.

Liked Gab and the decentralized web by Ben WerdmüllerBen Werdmüller

These are complicated ethical questions. As builders of software on the modern internet, we have to know that there are potentially serious consequences to the design decisions we make. Facebook started as a prank by a college freshman and now has a measurable impact on genocide in Myanmar. While it’s obvious to me that everyone having unhindred access to knowledge is a net positive that particularly empowers disadvantaged communities, and that social media has allowed us to have access to new voices and understand a wider array of lived experiences, it has also been used to spread hate, undermine elections, and disempower whole communities. Decentralizing the web will allow more people to share on their own terms, using their own voices; it will also remove many of the restrictions to the spread of hatred.
In America, we’re unfortunately used …

Liked Running against Tony Abbott in Warringah by an author (The Saturday Paper)

I’m not considering running for office because I have always dreamed of being an MP – although I don’t deny it would be interesting. I am thinking about it because I see it as a civic duty. I was brought up by parents who had lived in Manchester and London through World War II. They were adolescents at the time and have vivid and disturbing memories of the Blitz and of the revelations about Nazi death camps in the immediate aftermath of the war. It affected them profoundly. They brought me up to believe that bad things happen when good people stand by and do nothing.

Bookmarked 4chan: The Skeleton Key to the Rise of Trump – Dale Beran – Medium by an author (Medium)

Trump’s younger supporters know he’s an incompetent joke; in fact, that’s why they support him.

Dale Beran unpacks the rise of 4chan. This explores memes, Anonymous and the progressive move into politics. For a different perspective, listen to Charles Arthur’s interview with Jake Davis:

As well as danah boyd’s exploration of the connections between 4Chan and fake news.

Liked The Wentworth byelection isn’t just a loss for the Liberals. It’s a disaster | Katharine Murphy by an author (the Guardian)

As a medical doctor, Phelps could diagnose the ailing polity of being in need of critical care, and propose herself as being the person qualified to provide it, and having been invited to do so, Wentworth called the ambulance.

Liked Tehan threatens to withhold school funding unless deal is struck by Henrietta Cook (The Sydney Morning Herald)

The Morrison government has threatened to withhold billions of dollars of funding earmarked for Australian public and private schools next year if states refuse to sign up to its new education funding deal.

I agree with James Merlino:

“If Mr Tehan were serious about education, he would work with states and territories to provide fair funding for every child rather than come up with solutions that pit one sector against the other.”

This feels like Groundhog Day. I am a little sick of the politics associated with state education. The way this is going I might threaten to vote Labor in the next election 🤷‍♂️