Liked How Discord (somewhat accidentally) invented the future of the internet by David Pierce (Protocol)

Five years in, it’s clear that Discord has done something remarkable. It’s built a space that feels unlike any other on the internet. It’s not quite group chat, it’s not quite forums, it’s not quite conference calling. It’s all of those things and none of them. It turns out, in that messy middle, is a place that mirrors what it’s like to be human, and interact with other humans, more closely than just about anything else on the internet. (For better, and sometimes for worse.) That’s not what Citron, Vishnevskiy and their team were going for, but it’s what they have now. And they’re not pivoting anymore.

Liked The End of App Stores Is Rapidly Approaching by Owen Williams (Medium)

PWAs might look like normal websites on the surface, but they’re backed by a new breed of technology that allows them to act much more like traditional apps, with off-line support, push notifications, keyboard shortcuts, and even the ability to be installed on your desktop or home screen.

Replied to Scripting News: Friday, February 15, 2019 by Dave WIner (Scripting News)

A better approach is to use Twitter tech to glue together a variety of apps, each with their focus on one aspect of networked communication and publishing.

Dave, although I have concerns about Twitter, I do like the way webmentions brings comments back to my site. I am not sure if this is what you mean by ‘gluing apps together’?
I got caught in another discussion about ‘lookup tables‘ today. There are some people I work with who get really caught up with what they are and how they work. Another colleague pointed out to me afterwards that most applications have lookup tables it is just that our application actually allows users to easily edit the various tables.

This had me wondering if a way of thinking about ‘lookup tables’ is the collection of ideas and values that we reference each and every day? As with different applications, maybe there are those whose foundations are more visible and obvious that others? As Ben Werdmuller suggests,

We’ve all got red lines. They’re ours alone to draw.

Liked From Macs to iPods and apps: how Apple revolutionised technology by Alex Hern (the Guardian)

Even by the time of the Macintosh, Apple’s strengths were becoming clear. The company was not the trailblazer: the Apple II was not the first microcomputer, and the Macintosh was not the first with a GUI.

Instead, it was the company that brought concepts to the mainstream. And that is what it did almost 20 years after the Macintosh, with the product that remade Apple and put it on the path to becoming the world’s first trillion-dollar company: the iPod.

Replied to 5 Useful, Free Photo Apps for Teachers and Students by Kathleen Morris (Primary Tech)

In this post, I’m going to share five apps to do with photography and images that I’ve been exploring lately.

I feel like these could be useful to help teachers and/or students overcome certain obstacles … or just have fun being creative.

This is an interesting collection of apps Kathleen. I think that what you use often comes down to which platform you are on.

I have collected some options and alternatives to Google Drawings, but these are usually web-based (although what is ‘the web’ when a Chromebook can run Android apps.)

In regards to Adobe, I wonder if the ‘school managed accounts’ can be used beyond just Adobe Spark?

Bookmarked Many More Webs Bite The Dust (CogDogBlog)

Three years after publishing the first version of Another Web Bites The Dust (35 corpses), it was time to update, and add 24 more dead web sites to the video.

Alan Levine adds to his lists of web sites that have been shut down. Attached to this is a video montage:

Only a day later and another site has already been added, Wikispaces.