Bookmarked Scripting News: Tuesday, January 23, 2018 (Scripting News)
Five years. Between 1994 and 1999, there was a brief period when the web was truly open. There was no one who could veto you. No one who, if they took offense to what you said or did, could knock you off the net. There were people who tried. That made it dramatic. But there was blue sky everywhere. Now the web is divided into silos controlled by big companies. A little bit of light shows through between the cracks. I keep hoping that one crack will open into a new world that's open where we can play where we have users to serve, and competitors to compete with. I go from slightly optimistic to get-a-clue-Dave-it-ain't-happening.
Winer remembers when the web was without silos who could control what we see or do. He wonders about finding cracks in today’s web to support such expression and experience once again. This reminds me of Chris Aldrich’s desire for a better web:

Iโ€™m not looking for just a โ€œhipster-webโ€, but a new and demonstrably better web.

I wonder what part something like Micro.blogs could play with all this.

Bookmarked Feed reader developers -- here's an easy way to differentiate your service and have your users love you even more (scripting.com)
There are whole new areas of technology waiting for you to add this feature!
Dave Winer makes the case for subscribing to OPML files within feed readers. This was one of the reasons I moved to Inoreader. However, he suggests that Feedly also supports this functionality, maybe it is a paid feature?

๐Ÿค” #WhatIf People Only Conversed from their Own Sites?

In a recent Chips with Everything podcast, Jordan Erica Webber paints the picture of a world where people have ‘feeds’ that are owned and manipulated by third-party vendors. The question that this poses is what if people were able manage their own feeds? This is the future that Tim Berners-Lee suggests in response to ‘how to fix the internet’:

This would also give you access to all of the data you create. We don’t have much control over how our data is used, yet we are also limited in what we can do with it ourselves. Berners-Lee gives the example of fitness-activity data: rather than it being locked up with a company, we should be able to decide whether or not to share this information and with whom. “If you can’t read it, it should be because I’ve decided that you shouldn’t read it – not because our machines won’t talk to each other,” he says. An app on the Solid platform could pull in your own data, plus any that others have shared with you. “[It’s] much more powerful for you as a user, because you can integrate all the data that you have got access to,” he adds.

I am not sure how MIT’s Solid project exactly works, maybe this is what Dave Winer talks about. However, I wonder what a #IndieWeb world would look like? Instead of worrying tagging people on Twitter or Facebook, use Person Tags to notify other users. Syndicate comments across sites. Whatever happens, we need something more than this.