Liked Federal Judge Says Embedding a Tweet Can Be Copyright Infringement (Electronic Frontier Foundation)
Rejecting years of settled precedent, a federal court in New York has ruled [PDF] that you could infringe copyright simply by embedding a tweet in a web page. Even worse, the logic of the ruling applies to all in-line linking, not just embedding tweets. If adopted by other courts, this legally and technically misguided decision would threaten millions of ordinary Internet users with infringement liability.
Bookmarked Many More Webs Bite The Dust (CogDogBlog)
Three years after publishing the first version of Another Web Bites The Dust (35 corpses), it was time to update, and add 24 more dead web sites to the video.
Alan Levine adds to his lists of web sites that have been shut down. Attached to this is a video montage:

Only a day later and another site has already been added, Wikispaces.

Confident – the connecting of the dots and capitalising on different possibilities.

Essential Elements of Digital Literacies

In this microcast, I reflect on automating technology and wonder if there is a limit to how far we should go.

Further reading:


Replied to Facebook, Medium, And Staying The Course Within Your Own Domain by Kin Lane (kinlane.com)
We all want more traffic, readers, and hopefully revenue around our work. It is always tempting to think the grass is greener on another platform. However, we should never lose sight of the importance of owning, operating, and cultivating our own domain. There will always be new platforms who come along and prey upon our desire for more traffic, and the magical network effects they will bring, but it will NEVER be worth abandoning our own domain. Platforms come and go, pivot, shift courses, and rarely will think of you as more than just a data point. Nobody will ever care as much about your content, data, and audience as you do, and I’m hoping folks are starting to learn their lesson after the whole Facebook bullshit.
Great post Kin. Personally, I have really enjoyed digging into the #IndieWeb and taking my blogging and experience with –domains even further. One of my frustrations with Medium is the lack of webmentions. I can understand why – all about the eyeballs – and I do not agree. Like yourself, there are some random posts I POSSE there, but most of the time stay away.

The other half of the conversation is the functionality provided on Medium. If people want ‘annotations’, they can use things like Hypothes.is, if they want to provide the options to link, they can add fragmentions, while there are many themes that provide similar look and feel. To be honest, I think that Hackeducation.com is one of the cleanest reading experiences.

Although third-party applications make it ‘easy’ to sharecrop, the question is at what cost?

Replied to I relished Om Malik's post by Colin WalkerColin Walker (colinwalker.blog)
Having blogs as places to think out loud we can pool our resources. By following blogs we outsource the gathering of these snippets and they are buffered for easier perusal in the outboard memories of others, ready to be raided at our leisure. But, in doing so, we should not forget our own, not forget to load up our memories from time to time to keep at least some of them fresh that we may be inspired.
Nice reflection Colin. I find it interesting the way that focuses and intents associated with blogging develop and evolve over time. Although I do sometimes go back to my Twitter feed to find past conversations, I agree with you that it is a bit of dumping spot. For a long time my habit has been to save links to Diigo and shared on Twitter. Is Diigo my ‘Commonplace Book’?

Bringing my processes in house and then POSSEing has actually made me a lot more mindful

  • A. of what I share
  • B. the notes, quotes and tags associated with this

It has also led to a lot more internal linking. I think that this practice is a continuation of what I started with my Wikity and curated newsletter. I think that the challenge is to continually “apply what you learn“. In the end, I wonder if an element of blogging is located in the present. As Clive Thompson suggests:

Having an audience can clarify thinking. It’s easy to win an argument inside your head. But when you face a real audience, you have to be truly convincing.(wired)