Bookmarked At Almost Ten Years Old, Five Card Flickr Tells Its Survival Story (CogDogBlog)
How many web sites you use now will be around in ten years? Your odds are better if you make it your own, Keep on Reclaiming.
Interestingly, PechaFlickr came up in comversation the other day. Sadly, that website seems to have a PHP error too.

Originally published on Read Write Collect

Bookmarked ISP Column - June 2018 (potaroo.net)
Huston's analysis steps through the seven layers in the OSI stack, beginning with changes in the physical infrastructure (massive improvements in optical signalling, more and better radio, but we're still using packet-sizes optimized for the 1990s); then the IP layer (we're still using IPv4!); routing (BGP is, remarkably, still a thing -- on fire, all the time); net ops (when oh when will SNMP die?); mobile (all the money is here); end-to-end transport (everything is about to get much better, thanks to BBR); applications (Snowden ushered in a golden age of crypto, CDNs are routing around stupid phone companies, and cybersecurity is a worse dumpster fire than even BGP) and the IoT (facepalm).
This report into the web is intriguing and interesting to compare with James Bridle’s discussion of infrastructure and the impact of global warming on things.

via Boing Boing

Liked A Study of 1 Million Teenagers Reveals This Much Screen Time a Day Leads to the Happiest Kids (Inc.com)
The key is to not just say, but do. Offer more attractive alternatives. And don't just encourage other activities; actually get involved. Do things your kids like to do. Take them places they like to go. Help them learn a sport. Help them learn to play an instrument. Make it easy for friends to visit, and for them to visit friends -- in real life, not virtually.
Via Glen Cochrane

📓 Signals

In a reflection on engaging with the #IndieWeb, Ian O’Byrne unpacks the signals that we share online, both seen and unseen:

In a digital space, we also create and share signals. For most people, these signals are very distinct. They include tweets or posts that you share on social networks. They also include your reactions (likes, favorites, love, haha, wow, angry, sad).

Many more of your signals are unseen, or at least unseen to you. These signals include metadata, or “data about data” that tracks you as you move across the web. This metadata could be descriptive, structural, or administrative. A good way to think about this is the card catalog system in a library. You have the actual book, but then you also have information in a system about the title, abstract, author and keywords (descriptive). The card catalog system will also include information about how many pages and chapters are included in the table of contents (structural). The library will also save information about whether the book is checked out, who last checked it out, and where is it located on the stacks if it is still available (administrative).

Discussing the act of sharing online, Donelle Batty poses some questions to consider to help reflect on our own signals:

So are you in control of the story of you? Before you even start sharing life events, your opinion and the ever loved cat video, you need to consider the social spaces you are in, what settings (and personal boundaries) you are putting in place to determine who sees your content and thoughts. You see social media is a great tool for connecting with people. It is through connecting with others (be it random or deliberate) that we gain insights into peoples lives, insights that we may not have had access to before. When we gain an insight into someones life is it what we expect? Is it something that makes you feel uncomfortable or comfortable? Does it change the way you interact with them? Let’s now flip the question and ask what might the perception be of you by those who follow, friend or connect with you?

Bookmarked Why I Love Link Blogging (BirchTree)
The web allows us to create content that is connected with the rest of the web. Everything we do, especially us writers, is kicked off by something someone else said, and we should embrace that. Make your blog a part of a conversation, not an island that feels like you’re just doing this all on your own. None of us are, and we should be proud of that.
I too love link blogs. Reflecting on the three methods of writing outlined:

Do I write my article as a brand new post that gives the impression I thought of something in a vacuum? Do I write a normal post and link to the article/tweet that inspired me inline? Do I do a full block quote that shows off what idea got me going and write from there?

I feel I find myself wondering which link to reference. More recently, I have taken to referring to many of my own bookmarks. Although this is useful for my own thinking, I wonder if it impeds readers?

H/T Chris Aldrich

Bookmarked Gold Coast council dumps plan to mine Facebook data from Commonwealth Games visitors using free wi-fi - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) (mobile.abc.net.au)
A plan to mine data from Commonwealth Games visitors who use free high speed wi-fi has been dumped by Gold Coast City Council a day after it was reported by the ABC. Originally the council was going to require people to use their Facebook login if they wanted fast wi-fi. Council told the ABC it would collect some data from users' Facebook pages including their age, nationality and gender.
Is this the start of many reflections based on the Cambridge Analytica revelations? In part this reminds me of the changes in the way people saw things after Snowden. Thinking about Doug Belshaw’s web timeline:

● 1993-1997: The Information Superhighway

● 1999-2002: The Wild West

● 2003-2007: The Web 2.0 era

● 2008-2012: The Era of the App

● 2013+: The Post-Snowden era

I wonder if this will be another shift?

Replied to Re-thinking the Homepage by Eddie Hinkle (eddiehinkle.com)
This is definitely not the end of my site revisions, it’s really just the start. But it allows me to use this for awhile and see what I like and don’t like.
I really like the look of this Eddie. I have always looked on at Chris Aldrich’s site and felt that it was a little bit beyond what I was after. However, you provide a different approach and show how it may not need to be so complicated. I do however like Aldrich’s breakdown of the different Post Kinds as a sort of menu.