Replied to 7 Ideas To Find Inspiration For New Blog Posts by an author (The Edublogger)
There are two types of bloggers. One has a never-ending list of blog post ideas but just can’t find the time to write them all. The other wants to write more blog posts but is stuck for ideas. Which type of blogger are you? If you’re the latter, you’re in luck. This post offers you 7 ideas to help you find inspiration for your future blog posts. These ideas apply to both student and teacher bloggers.
This is a good collection of ideas Kathleen. One thing that I do not see discussed a lot is post formats and the possibilities that this can provide in regards to collecting and curating ideas? Personally, I use post kinds, which is a different flavour, but achieves a similar outcome.
Replied to A Plan For Writing A Weekly Blog Post In 10 Minutes A Day (The Edublogger)
This post outlines a simple approach that will see you develop consistency with your blogging and publish one blog post a week. You only need 10 minutes a day to reach your blogging goals!
I love the idea of breaking blogging down into a deliberate and sustainable habit. Not sure it would work for my complex and sometimes chaotic workflows, but I could see it working for some.
Replied to Should I Use Seesaw Or A WordPress Blog In The Classroom? Pros And Cons Of Digital Portfolio Tools
This post will help you evaluate whether Seesaw is something that’s worth using in your classroom. Or, if blogging with WordPress is a better option to replace or complement Seesaw.
Thank you Kathleen for breaking down the differences and similarities between Seesaw and Edublogs (and blogs). Reading your discussion of ‘dumping’ evidence verses crafting a presence, made me think of my own practice of collecting posts (such as this) versus crafting longer responses.

Some of the further thoughts I had about the differences were around:

  • Parental Engagement: Once set up, Seesaw is easy to engage with either via desktop or mobile. It often feels as if blogs involve more effort.
  • Platform verses Process: I wonder if a focus on Seesaw versus Edublogs overlooks the question of process? I know you touch upon digital presence This was something I tried to grapple with recently in a presentation on using GSuite to support ongoing reporting.
  • Transfer-ability: The one thing that I love about WordPress and Edublogs is that I can easily take my data and load it somewhere else. I am yet to work out what I would do with all the artefacts I collect in Seesaw.

In the end I think that the biggest question that people need to consider is what is trying to be achieved and which tool will help this.

Bookmarked Teaching Digital Citizenship: 10 Internet Safety Tips For Students (With Cyber Safety Posters) by an author
While it’s unlikely young people will never experience an issue online, I believe it is a good aim to both minimise potential harm and ensure students feel like they always have someone to talk to. Digital citizenship education is an ongoing process, and the work of one teacher is not enough. Ideally, we need parents, students, educators, community members, and school leaders to unite. Most of all, we need to create a positive culture where students feel empowered to use technology safely and purposefully.
Kathleen Morris outlines her four layered approach to teaching digital citizenship. This focuses on integrating the various skills within the curriculum, providing real world stories to reflect upon, building up student toolkits and developing lines of communication. Associated with this, she also provides ten tips for students.
Bookmarked 12 Tips For Maintaining Momentum With Blogging by an author (The Edublogger)
So you’ve made it this far and started 2019 with a great start to blogging. How do you keep it going? Here are 12 tips to offer you some inspiration. Different things work for different people and we’d love you to share your own tips in a comment!
Closing off the 28 day blogging challenge, Kathleen Morris provides a list of strategies for maintaining momentum. On the flip side, Aaron Hogan provides a list of blogging rules that you do not have to follow. These include the idea that blogs need to look a certain way or be perfect.

10 Blogging Rules You Don't Have to Follow

Replied to
I have experienced a combination of LMS (Sentral, Compass, Synergetic) and social media (Facebook pages). I have discussed the use of Slides for newsletters in the past. I also think that there is scope for storing ‘newsletters’ in Google Drive to embed elsewhere.

Personally, I think that it is a balance between where parents are and where you want them to be. I think a lot of people baulk at something like Edublogs because it is another space to log into, however I have significant concerns about sending people to places like Facebook and other such sites because of the issues with algorithms and advertising.

What annoys me most though about most forms of notifications is that they often send out a link to the information with just enough detail to get you to click, but not enough to be content.

Replied to 10 Productivity Tips For Teachers (And Students) (Primary Tech by Kathleen Morris)
Not all strategies are for everyone. I like hearing tips and workflows from others but it’s up to you to decide what will work for you.
I really like your point Kathleen that not every strategy works for everyone. The thing that I would add to that is that not every strategy that works for you will work every time.

In my new role I really had to think hard about what strategies I use to stay productive. This was working until I changed teams and subsequently work. Being a lot more collaborative and involving a centralised response system, I have tried (and failed) a number of strategies to make it all work for me. One approach was to create a Google Sheet, which was organise into categories and had a status column which allowed me to prioritise.

I liked this setup as it allowed me to easily change the statuses and add links to further information. The issue is that it involves a lot of doubling up between systems.

In the end, I am getting what needs to be done completed at the moment, but I am still looking for something more productive.

Replied to
Now I know what my problem has been all these years … Colour! If only my principal had allowed me to print in colour I could have made so much more difference.
Replied to My Class: Student Blogging Made Easy! (The Edublogger)
My Class has had an update! Our management tool is ideal for teachers with students who either have their own student blog or publish posts on the class blog. This post explains all the features of My Class and how to use it.
I love My Class in Edublogs and feel that it is often overlooked in light of other platforms, such as SeeSaw.

Is the addition of email-less accounts in line with GDPR? I remember discovering the hack to be able to create accounts using ‘+text’ on the end of a Google account. The only issue is that this can sometimes contriven the local policy in place.

For example, Global2 requires students to sign up with their school email.

Originally published on Read Write Collect