Replied to A Simple Plan to Make My Love of Reading Transparent to My Students by Bill Ferriter (The Tempered Radical)
To make my love of reading even more transparent this year, I’m stealing an idea from my friend Pete Caggia: I’ve created a space on my board where I’m sharing the covers of the books that I’ve already read this year AND the cover of the book that I’m currently reading.
Bill, I am assuming that you only teach in the one classroom?
Liked Lead Smarter, Not Harder Tip 2: Start Asking Better Interview Questions by Bill Ferriter (Tempered Radical)
The goal for interviews in a professional learning community ISN’T to spot candidates who already have “all the answers” to questions about technology use or differentiation or classroom management. The goal for interviews in a professional learning community is to spot candidates who are reflective, who have a growth mindset about their own practice, and who realize that personal growth is a function of collective study with capable peers.
Replied to Lead Smarter, Not Harder Tip One: Understand Teacher Approaches to Change by Bill Ferriter (Tempered Radical)
Leading smarter, not harder depends on having a clear understanding of who the Trailblazers, Pioneers, Settlers, Stay-at-Homes and Saboteurs are in your building because each group is going to need different kinds of support in order to move forward. 
This is interesting Bill. I think that the hard thing is that we do not always choose who we work with.
Liked How Much SHOULD a Public School Teacher Make? by Bill Ferriter (The Tempered Radical)

Long story short:  I’m a realist.  Teachers are never going to make a fortune.  It’s not fiscally responsible — and the fact of the matter is that we HAVE to be fiscally responsible.  

But let’s quit pretending that teachers who are using their voices to draw attention to the sad state of funding in our public schools and to the impact those funding choices are having on kids are bad people trying to fleece America.

Liked Want to Drive Change? Find Your California Roll by Bill Ferriter (The Tempered Radical)
Just because Japanese restaurants wanted to serve exotic recipes to American customers from day one doesn’t mean that American patrons were ready to eat them. Instead, attracting interest and long term commitment meant creating recipes that introduced change incrementally, one new and interesting ingredient at a time.
Bookmarked Simple Truth: Technology Changes. The Skills We Believe in Don’t by William Ferriter (Tempered Radical)
People passionately argue that there ARE no “wrong answers” when it comes to using technology in teaching and learning. Or they passionately argue that you CAN’T do any of the tasks in the right hand column without the tools listed in the left hand column. Or they passionately argue that by labeling the actions in the left hand column “wrong answers,” I’m hurting people’s feelings and alienating teachers who aren’t quite ready to take kids towards the behaviors listed in the right hand column. But like it or not, I’ve chosen those words deliberately.
Bill Ferriter revisits his image of right and wrong use of technology.

Image - Technology is a Tool - V3

“Image – Technology is a Tool – V3” by William M Ferriter is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND

In support of this, he provides three reasons why he stands by his assertion of ‘wrong’:

  1. It provides a starting points for conversations about the use of technology
  2. If teachers aren’t looking beyond tools when making instructional choices their decision-making really is flawed
  3. Not buying the alienation argument

This comes back to his argument that technology makes learning more ‘doable‘.

Replied to Teaching Critical Thinking? These Mythbusters Activities Will Help by Bill Ferriter (The Tempered Radical)
Our goal is to help students recognize that gaps in thinking aren’t something to be afraid of.  They are something to be openly acknowledged and then addressed through deliberate attempts to gather more information.
Bill this is fantastic idea. I like the use of a graphic organiser to scaffold the thinking. It reminds me of the Zoom In routine, where it is impossible to ‘know’ what the image is, therefore forcing student to justify their interpretations.
Listened Microcast #001: Publish > Polish by Bill Ferriter from Tempered Radical
Have we gotten to the point where “blogging” no longer means messy reflection in the minds of most people? Is there now an expectation that blogs have to be filled with content that has been carefully created and “spit-shined?”And if so, does that discourage new bloggers from ever getting started?