Replied to Flip the System Australia | It's About Learning by Cameron Paterson (learningshore.edublogs.org)
My chapter for Flip the System Oz was co-authored with Keren Caple from the Innovation Unit. In it we advocate generating networks of teachers across schools to learn from each other, placing trust in the grassroots, and creative reimagining. I used the term “Strategic Corporal”, which is the notion that leadership in complex, rapidly evolving environments devolves lower and lower down the chain of command to more effectively incorporate the latest on the ground data into decision-making. Too much education reform remains top-down, imposed on schools without drawing on or supporting the development of capacities within the system. We need to shift the narrative and reform from the bottom up.
I look forward to reading the book and your chapter Cameron. Having been a part of a collective investigating reporting, there is real power in working together. My only wondering is the role of the central, top-down system, which often ironically maybe supports and facilitates such initiatives.

Syndicated at Read Write Collect
Liked Democracy and Education by Cameron Paterson (It's About Learning)
Democracy requires active work. Every generation has to reclaim it. Educators have a critical function, at a moment when we live in filter bubbles and echo chambers, to create safe spaces and facilitate points of confrontation to break single identities. If we are serious about democracy, it is about how we teach. It is about living democracy in the classroom. It might be timely for teachers to consider whether they model authoritarian leaders, how they might support curricula disobedience and academic freedom, and what their professional code of ethics is.
Bookmarked Building a Coaching Culture | It's About Learning by Cameron Paterson (learningshore.edublogs.org)
One of the key learnings from educational research over recent years is that it is simply not possible to measure the quality of teaching the way people want to. Measurement is a comfort blanket but most of the measurement is meaningless. Coaching is our way of promoting a culture of trust, instead of an audit and micromanagement culture.
In Cameron Paterson’s notes from a staff presentation he outlines the many benefits of coaching and how it differs from a managerial approach.
Bookmarked Establishing a Culture of Thinking (It's About Learning)

Some simple ways to begin practicing documentation include:

  • Sharing a short video clip of documentation at the start of class or a meeting by displaying a brief clip and then asking students their thoughts about it.
  • Taking a photo of an especially powerful learning moment to revisit with students by using the classroom walls to display the documentation.
  • Jotting down a provocative or insightful quote from a student to share with the class via speech bubbles on the walls.
  • Cameron Paterson provides a useful introduction to Ron Ritchhart’s Cultures of Thinking and the notion of documentation. Along with Silvia Tolisano and Diane Kashin, I have written about Project Zero and the routines of thinking before. I was also left thinking about the power of documentation during a recent session with Amy Burvall, where we critiqued our creative thinking. However, Cameron’s post also left me wondering about the place of thinking and documentation outside of the classroom?
    Liked Shadow a Student by Cameron Paterson (It's About Learning)
    Shadowing is not about evaluating classes, teachers, or the student. Indeed, it is a good idea not to tell the teachers that you are coming to their class so they are not tempted to put on a show. The goal is to immerse yourself in the student’s experience, preferably commencing as soon as they arrive at school in the morning. Recording and documenting your observations and taking pictures and videos throughout the day to support your observations are a key part of the shadowing experience.
    Liked Educating for Civic Agency by Cameron Paterson (It's About Learning)
    What might pedagogies for supporting civic agency look like? How do students investigate civic issues? What are the complexities of gathering information in a networked age? How do students learn to talk across differences, imagine new possibilities, and cultivate skills to develop a social change agenda?