Liked https://wiobyrne.com/turning-towards-each-other/ (wiobyrne.com)
  • Cultivate Empathy: Empathy is the cornerstone of turning towards each other. It allows us to understand the feelings and experiences of others without judgment or defensiveness. To cultivate empathy, we must be willing to sit with discomfort and open ourselves up to the experiences of others.
  • Practice Active Listening: Active listening involves fully focusing on, understanding, responding to, and then remembering what is being said by another person. This means putting aside our own agendas or preconceived notions in order to truly hear what someone else is saying.
  • Embrace Vulnerability: Vulnerability can be scary because it involves exposing parts of ourselves that we often hide for fear of rejection or judgment. However, it’s through vulnerability that we create genuine connections with others.
  • Acknowledge and Validate Feelings: Validating someone’s feelings doesn’t necessarily mean agreeing with them. It simply means acknowledging their feelings and letting them know that their feelings make sense.
  • Prioritize Connection Over Being Right: One of the key elements of turning towards each other is choosing connection over being right. This entails putting aside our need to win arguments or prove points, and instead focus on understanding the other person’s perspective.
  • Transitioning from Turning on Each Other to Turning Towards Each Other by Ian O’Byrne

    Bookmarked HEWN, No. 345 (hewn.substack.com)

    The question right now for educators should not be “what technology do I need to move my class online?” The question should be “what am I doing to support my students (and my colleagues and my family)?” Start there — not with tech but with compassion.

    With so much discussion of the pivot to technology and learning at home, Audrey Watters suggests that our focus needs to be on care and compassion.
    Liked Shadow a Student by Cameron Paterson (It’s About Learning)

    Shadowing is not about evaluating classes, teachers, or the student. Indeed, it is a good idea not to tell the teachers that you are coming to their class so they are not tempted to put on a show. The goal is to immerse yourself in the student’s experience, preferably commencing as soon as they arrive at school in the morning. Recording and documenting your observations and taking pictures and videos throughout the day to support your observations are a key part of the shadowing experience.

    Replied to Vulnerability by Corrie (cbarclay.global2.vic.edu.au)

    Empathy is about feeling with people and understanding with emotion the plight they may be in. It takes a true human connection to be made for empathy to be real and genuine. It is that empathetic connection that makes the feeling of being vulnerable better.

    Nice post to start back on Corrie. Whether it be restorative practice or positive education, the emotional side seems to something we are addressing more and more today. I wrote about emotions and coaching last year. One of my concerns with this area is that it becomes another thing to typecast students (and teachers) with. See for example PISA’s move into pyschometric testing.