Liked Creativity in the classroom (C2 Melbourne)
Organising a timetable that functions efficiently and also embraces Asimov’s conditions, providing the appropriate time and pace for our students to be deeply creative is a complex issue. It will be one of the biggest hurdles for our schools to overcome and is a vital component of contemporary learning design. Changing the way we organise time might just be the key to unlocking the ideal conditions for creativity in schools.
Replied to Cows of the Future by Tom Barrett (Dialogic Learning Weekly #71)
Think of a topic outside of school that you have a deep understanding of. What are the signals that indicate you have a deep knowledge and understanding of that topic?
I find the idea of ‘deep Learning’ fascinating. I feel that deep learning is often when you know that you don’t know. Often when you start out on a new topic you get a little bit of knowledge and you think that you know it. However, this is not deep until you dig down and get to the point where you realise you can’t know and that your knowledge will always be limited.

Take for example my recent deep dive into Global2. I have worked with, written about and presented on WordPress. However the further I went the more I realised that there were so many nuances that I had never considered. This has been taken to a whole new level with my wonderings about the #IndieWeb.

I therefore find Fullan’s reference in A Rich Seam to deep learning being associated with learning goals problematic. Although such goals can guide the learning, i think deep learning is often directed by fuzzy goals.

Bookmarked Problem Finding by Tom Barrett (The Curious Creative)
I have adapted some of the Design Kit steps below and have a HMW Framing template
Based on the methods of Design Kit, Tom Barrett breaks the process of framing a problem into eight steps:

  1. Describe the problem or issue
  2. List the stakeholders
  3. Re-frame the issue as a How Might We statement
  4. Describe the impact you are attempting to have.
  5. Why needs your help the most?
  6. What are some possible solutions to your problem?
  7. Describe the context and constraints you have to your future ideas.
  8. Re-write a different version of your original HMW statement.

Here is an image I made based on the How Might We format:

I remember when I ran Genius Hour, I used HMW, however I struggled with supporting students in developing these. I think that Barrett’s steps helps with that.

Replied to Find a Doorway That Fits Us Both by Tom Barrett (The Curious Creative)
As King suggests the first line is an invitation. As a teacher this might be the first interaction in a school day, or the opening activity of a period of learning. Crucial moments to draw learners in and engage their curiosity.
I think that this counts for blogs as well. With the statistics suggesting that people rarely read beyond the first few lines, it is important to make it count. For the last year I have been starting each post with an ‘excerpt’ that hopefully helps readers know if it is of interest.
Replied to
I have replied to the fear about ‘micro engagement’ before, wondering what it actually is we classify as a comment. What I wonder everytime I read that sort of thing is what the alternative looks like? Mastadon? Newsletters? Micro.blog? The question I am left with is if you were to look ahead five years into the future, what would you see and how did we get there?
Replied to Has the meaning of β€œblog post” changed? by Tom Barrett (The Curious Creative)
I would still say that a blog is primarily a space for a person to process their thinking and do the messy reflection Ferriter suggests. We might be inundated with the polished self-help style articles that panders to a dependent audience but that doesn’t stop every writer forging their own rationale for creating their own digital space.
Thank you Tom for taking the time to respond. I am well aware that blogging has changed and enjoyed your story shared on the Design and Play podcast.

There is one point in your post I wish to clarify:

Davis ponders on whether we should [still] be promoting blogging as a way to connect with an engaged community of thoughtful contributors.

I am not questioning the act of blogging or microblogging. My work associated with the #IndieWeb surely demonstrates that. Rather, I am concerned about the idea of modelling such an intense pattern of writing as means of introduction for those who maybe uninitiated. Just my opinion I guess.

The irony of it all is that I love your writing and always get so much out of it, so I guess I should be grateful for #28daysofwriting as well as your newsletter.

I am left with a thought, maybe the newsletter not micro engagement that has been the ‘death of blogging’? Anyway, enough for now.

Write everyday for 28 minutes for 28 days. #28daysofwriting
via Tom Barrett

Tom Barrett has started up #28daysofwriting again. This is my reflection on the idea of a habit and a sustainable blogging practice.

Further reading: