Liked On Western vs Imperial Knowledge (Reflecting Allowed)
Much of the way education is organized around individual achievement makes inequality almost inevitable. It is in some people’s advantage to be differentiated from others, whether that privilege is earned or automatic because of cultural and social capital of school fitting well with their (dominant) identity and social standing.
Liked On Being African (and other things) ahead of @emergeAfrica (Reflecting Allowed)
So yeah. I mean, we can’t generalize about Africa. I share some things w South Africa but not apartheid history. I share some things w Tunisians but I don’t actually understand their Arabic dialect. I share a lot with Sudan but more with Jordan even though Egypt and Sudan used to be one country. I was born and raised in Kuwait but share more with third culture kids than I do with Kuwaitis.
Liked Too Radical for Trust? Too Peripheral for Power? by Maha Bali (Reflecting Allowed)
We don’t need someone else to give us power to make a difference. We just need to trust in our own power. We do not need someone else to trust our vision if we are resourceful enough to trust our own vision and see it through. I’d rather have vision than position, especially if the position would suppress my vision.
Replied to Why teachers are turning to Twitter by Brendon Hyndman (The Conversation)
Rather than a one-off professional learning event (such as a conference), Twitter provides a low-cost, easy to access platform. It requires little effort beyond 280 character posts or photos to connect with a range of education professionals, leaders and organisations.
I am a massive advocate of open education. I feel the possibility of a wider audience has taken my learning to a new level. Reading this post, I just feel that there is a massive question not considered.

If you interviewed my last year, would I provide the same response as I do now?

My experience of Twitter has waned of late. I still share there. I still engage with people. However, I have moved my learning to my own space. I think that this is important.

As with all technology, Twitter is ever evolving. The most recent news has been the depreciation of their API that allows for the development of external applications. Each of these changes has a consequence.

The other concern I have is which teachers are turning to Twitter? Chris Wejr questions whether every teacher is able to share who they are online?. Maha Bali also captures this in regards to open education:

what kind of privileges do we have that give us the power to have a space there – things like the English language, having the capacity for a good bandwidth on in the internet to do something like virtually connecting, having TIME to spare and being financially comfortable, being naturally willing to expose yourself and make yourself vulnerable – you have to have a lot of privileged to be willing to make yourself vulnerable. Because some people are already vulnerable and marginal and they cannot take certain risks online.

In addition to whether they can share themselves online, the other consideration is whether they must?

I wonder then if the title should be why some teachers are turning to Twitter and what does this say about education? Personally, I wonder whether more teachers will turn to the open web and a better web? Here is to hoping.

Bookmarked Open Web Stories – for DMLL @ Coventry (Reflecting Allowed)
On the open web, we implicitly consent to more than I think we mean to.
Maha Bali reflects on her open education story. This involves responding to three questions:

  • What does the open web mean to you?
  • Why should we care about the open web?
  • Who are you?

She talks about the challenges of doing a PhD remotely, participation in MOOCs such as Rhizo14 and the creation of Virtually Connecting. She also shares some of the limits to open education, especially in regards to those who are vulnerable.

Replied to Writing to connect: knowing the “other” outside time & space (Reflecting Allowed)
Writing across each other’s blogs, I love how in some MOOCs, when people are focused on the same topic, one writes a post connecting ideas from multiple other posts, taking the ideas further, grabbing comments from elsewhere, and making something new, then recycling the ideas again. It’s a kind of “distributed” collaborative writing.
This is an intriguing reflection Maha. I like your points about writing across blogs, as well as connecting beyond ourselves. The one question I was left wondering is whether you would right the same post now? I too have written myself about the benefits of connected education. With both posts written a few years ago, I wonder if anything has changed? Would you still have the same outlook?