Bookmarked After Babel: Designing for Community (Sean Michael Morris)

Access, inclusion, design all have to fall together in favor of community, of dialogue, with content being no more than the field upon which those play. So, a design for community might include:

  • Interstitial, unfacilitated learning
  • Agency, meta-cognition, and self-determination
  • Building skills
  • Mentorship
In a keynote address for the Teaching and Learning with Technology Symposium at Metropolitan State University, Sean Michael Morris unpacks the challenges associated with learning in online communities. This has me thinking of David White’s discussion of coalescent spaces and the idea of a personal social media space.
Listened #70 – Virtual Community with Howard Rheingold – Modern Learners from Modern Learners

Howard Rheingold brings a sense of perspective and history to the conversation around our current understanding of community

Howard Rheingold discusses the development of virtual communities over time. From The Well to DS106, Rheingold discusses the power of learners to lead their own learning within such spaces. This is something Clint Lalonde discusses in regards to untrackable learning in private spaces.
Replied to Parent Involvement and Engagement by gregmiller68

Since the inception of St Luke’s in February 2017, one of the ongoing challenges of designing a ‘new normal’ for preschool to post school has been to clarify how we work in partnership with parents to nurture faith filled curious children to become creative contributors and innovative problem …

Always left inspired by the open sharing of your schools journey Greg. I remember parent engagement was my ‘moonshot’ that I took away from my Google experience:

How Might We ENGAGE PARENTS in a CULTURAL SHIFT to make RELATIONSHIPS and CONNECTIONS the focus of learning?

Although I may not have achieved the goals that I was aspiring towards, it is something which I feel grounds a lot of my work.

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Replied to the dark side of communities

Not all groups are for the good of society. Not all communities are there to promote democracy. We should all be aware of the dark sides of communities.

Harold, your point about negative communities. I like Ton’s point about connection to the outside air prevents the growth of negative communities. However, I wonder if connection with the outside is sometimes used to publicise and promote the negative ideas, rather than debate and discuss?
Bookmarked The Downside of Checking Kids’ Grades Constantly by an author (nytimes.com)

Digital grade portals were designed to improve home-school communication by allowing students and parents to monitor grades and attendance throughout the year so there are no surprises at report card time. In theory, a parent who checks the portal has the opportunity to stay on top of a child’s performance and facilitate support for the child if performance slips.

The reality, at least in high-pressure school districts, is that some parents interpret the school’s invitation to constantly monitor grades and scores on the portal not as an option, but as an obligation. This obligation adds to the mounting anxiety students and parents feel in these districts.

Jessica Lahey discusses the other side to anytime, anywhere access. The effort to irresistably engage parents can lead to an increase in anxiety and a devaluing of student-teacher relationships, relevance and student engagement. It is also interesting to consider where SeeSaw and danger of the digital dump.
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I am left wondering why it must be in response to such a situation that people come together? Is this what community has always been?

Bookmarked Communities or networks? – Matthew Esterman – Medium by Matthew Esterman (Medium)

The most useful network or community is the one you can build with your immediate team and colleagues in your school. They’re in the context and in the ‘know’. They’re accountable with you and they know the support structures — especially if it’s them — and can act on them. If you don’t feel you’re getting that support, find a mentor outside the context and learn to build relationships within. We need to be an active participant in those networks we choose to belong.

Matt Esterman reflects on the place of associations. Beyond reviewing our assumed attendances to such communities, Esterman recommends forming local networks. I have tried this in the past. The challenge I found with ‘local’ is catching up and being proactive.