Replied to My Way or the Highway (rtschuetz.net)

Just as with the auto repair shop, there are costs associated with ignoring research, experience, and observations. In an age of computer algorithms and artificial intelligence, how much value should we, do we, place on professional judgment?

Robert, I enjoyed your reflection on the balance between professional judgement and the use of technology. The world of algorithms and artificial intelligence is posing a lot of challenges for education at the moment. I likeΒ Simon Buckingham Shum’s challenge to define the education we want and go from there.
Replied to Digital Downsizing (part two) (rtschuetz.net)

What did I get in return for my one-hour investment? I reduced email spam from roughly sixty daily messages to two. I see very few pop-up ads, and my browser searches are more neutral. I have confidence that most of my web activity isn’t being tracked, although that’s difficult to fully quantify.

Another great reflection Bob on the importance of reviewing our settings regularly. Another interesting post you might want to check out is Doug Belshaw’s discussion of our digital estate.
Replied to

Sorry Bob for the belated response, Twitter can provide a way of connecting with experts and engaging in conversations. See @biancah80 https://biancahewes.wordpress.com/2015/03/21/thanks-for-the-chat-will-willkostakis/
Replied to Picking and Learning by an author (Nocking the Arrow)

For those of us concerned about our advancing years, taking up a hobby, learning new skills promotes mental health and longevity. Some folks work on crossword puzzles or play Soduko, others paint, write, or plant gardens. My commitment involves six strings, ten fingers, two eyes, two ears, and one hungry mind.

What I have learnt recently is the importance of learning something beyond education. I have been doing some thinking about writing a book about covers. In part I am interested in the process and what I can learn about myself. I really enjoyed Ryan Holiday’s reflections on the journey.
Liked Are Schools Safe? (rtschuetz.net)

Are schools safe? Statistically speaking, schools are very safe, and in the context of other mortality studies, schools have become better protected while other locations have become more dangerous. Maybe the better question is, “Do students and staff feel safe at school?” Be careful what you wish for if school policy and procedures are decided by outsiders. The people best qualified to make their school feel safer are the students, teachers, and administrators within the building. My recommendation for March 14th and beyond is for students to remain at school and engage in conversations about personal wellness, inclusivity, interdependence, and school climate. As is often the case, “the solution lies in the problem.”

Replied to Finding my Fingers; A Few Learning Stories (rtschuetz.net)

A blog about learning supported by innovation and social networks.

I found your discussion intriguing Bob.

When I think back to my schools (and university days) I feel a strange sense of guilt about the time that I (probably) wasted. What difference did I really make?

I think that as a learner I have a tendency to dive in. I probably commit myself far too much at the expense of other, maybe. I was struck once by this quote from Sartre:

When we say that man chooses himself, we do mean that every one of us must choose himself; but by that we also mean that in choosing for himself he chooses for all men.

I am always eager about what I do and how it could make a difference. Take for example my recent dive into #IndieWeb. This is driven by a curiosity about what might be and possibly how things could be better.

Thanks as always for your provocations,

Aaron