Liked Stop solving problems you don't yet have by Rachel Andrew
It’s a confusing world of options out there to the beginner and learning the basics of HTML and CSS development for modern browsers, then solving the issues that come up, is still the best grounding for any new developer.This situation is exactly what we asked for in the early days of the Web Stan...
RSVPed Interested in Attending https://courses.benlcollins.com/p/apps-script-blastoff
A free, introductory course teaching Google Apps Script from scratch
I have long had an interest in Google Apps Scripts. However, I have really gotten past simply appropriating other people’s code, especially Martin Hawksey’s work.

I have read a number of posts:

I look forward to this new offering. I always enjoy the way in which Collins’ breaks things down with his courses.

Listened Late Junction - Thom Yorke’s mixtape - BBC Sounds by an author from BBC
Catch up on your favourite BBC radio show from your favourite DJ right here, whenever you like. Listen without limits with BBC Sounds.
I always love Yorke’s thinking about music. In a short discussion at the start of his set he discusses his love of tape for recording, the place of mathematics within art and different possibilities and potentials out there. It was this last point that really left me thinking. Listening to Autechre or Father John Misty is not about reproducing their sound, but simply being aware of what sounds are in fact possible. This was in part in reference to his work associated with his soundtrack for Suspiria.
Replied to Episode 112: Running to Bangkok by Doug Belshaw, Dai Barnes (Tide Podcast)

This week, Doug and Dai discuss what’s been going on over the last couple of weeks, MozFest, MoodleMoot US, Universal Basic Income, humane technology, Creative Commons, success, decentralised apps, and more!

Dai, I was interested in your discussion of James Bridle’s book. I agree Dai with your concern about such a dystopian portrayal. That was something that I tried to get across in my post on becoming informed. Is the answer that it takes a range of voices to get to this stage?

With this in mind I am intrigued by the video you mention from Vox featuring Tristan Harris:

I liked his suggestions, but for me it is like going to McDonald’s to buy a salad. The issue is not the salad, but McDonald’s and their push for non-human consumption. I wonder about a sustainable smartphone, one that is built ethically from the outset, not one that puts the blame back on the user. As Audrey Watters argues:

I don’t want to suggest that this is something the consumer alone is responsible for – blaming consumers, for example, for looking at their phone when it vibrates or beeps or for downloading Candy Crush and trying to get all their friends to play along. The whole modus operandi of the tech industry has been to create apps that are as engaging and compelling and viral as Candy Crush. The industry views its users as highly manipulable, their behaviors as something that can be easily shaped and nudged and controlled. Maybe it’s time to rethink and regulate and restrict how that happens?

Discussing the work of Harris the other such apologists, Watters asks why we should trust them:

Why should we trust these revelations (or revelators) to guide us moving forward? Why not trust those of us who knew it was bullshit all along and who can tell you the whole history of a bad idea?

I wonder then why we should trust Harris over Bridle and wonder whether in the end they both have a particular place at the table?

Liked Chapter 1: Introduction by Ian Guest (Marginal Notes)
Recent research is making it plain how complex teacher professional learning is. Adding Twitter into that mix does not simplify matters and I contend that these novel circumstances might be better addressed through a less conventional, more adaptive, responsive approach. Rather than working from a methodology which makes certain epistemological assumptions based on our current understanding of teacher professional learning, I wanted to remain open to different possibilities and hopefully produce fresh insights.
Listened Ep. 110 Enspiral: “Better Work Together” – Team Human by an author

Playing for Team Human today: Susan Basterfield and Anthony Cabraal. Susan and Anthony share the open secrets of bottom-up collaboration as we celebrate the publication of Enspiral’s book, Better Work Together. It’s a conversation about the power of working together, building on ideas “good enough to try,” and creating a space where it’s “safe to fail.”
Looking for collaborative and participatory ways to create social change? Enspiral has collected and opened up its learnings for all to replicate.

Douglas Rushkoff talks with Susan Basterfield and Anthony Cabraal about the challenge and experience of working cooperatively. The key to such a change is consciously opting in and taking radical responsibility. This is an interesting listen in regards to entrepreneurship. I am reminded of the work at Templestowe College and wonder if their structure is that of a cooperative?
Read Write Microcast #016 - Computer Games, Now and Then

That data-centric world seemed benign at first — smartness that helped us. We gave up data about ourselves, and the technology around us got smarter.(Genevieve Bell)

In this return to microcasting, I reflect on playing Command and Conquer and the way in which computer games have changed over time.