Bookmarked Simple Truth: Technology Changes. The Skills We Believe in Don’t by William Ferriter (Tempered Radical)
People passionately argue that there ARE no “wrong answers” when it comes to using technology in teaching and learning. Or they passionately argue that you CAN’T do any of the tasks in the right hand column without the tools listed in the left hand column. Or they passionately argue that by labeling the actions in the left hand column “wrong answers,” I’m hurting people’s feelings and alienating teachers who aren’t quite ready to take kids towards the behaviors listed in the right hand column. But like it or not, I’ve chosen those words deliberately.
Bill Ferriter revisits his image of right and wrong use of technology.

Image - Technology is a Tool - V3

“Image – Technology is a Tool – V3” by William M Ferriter is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND

In support of this, he provides three reasons why he stands by his assertion of ‘wrong’:

  1. It provides a starting points for conversations about the use of technology
  2. If teachers aren’t looking beyond tools when making instructional choices their decision-making really is flawed
  3. Not buying the alienation argument

This comes back to his argument that technology makes learning more ‘doable‘.

Liked A User Considers by Jeremy Cherfas
Yesterday, my current reader showed me that John Gordon, someone I knew and appreciated back in the days of ADN, had posted How to build a safe and sane social network. It's brief, fun and interesting, although I'm not myself sure that a 25:1 ratio of freeloaders to supporters would work. The bigger point, I think, is that he says nothing there about the underpinning technology. For me, that's the direction IndieWeb building blocks need to go.
Replied to Is your School an X or Why School? by Richard Wells (EDUWELLS)
Students and schools focussed on why they exist develop stronger engagement in all activities and this results in making achievement in what we do much easier.
I really enjoyed Sinek’s book.

One of the interesting points that I found was that ‘why’ is not necessarily something that you just sit around and decide. It involves culture and therefore action. In some respect it reminds me of trust. You cannot necessarily create ‘trust’, instead you put in place the conditions for trust to prosper. I think that the challenge we face is creating the conditions for why to prosper. I think that your book goes some way to doing this. However, I imagine that it will always be based on context and involve idiosyncrasies.

Replied to Digg is going to kill Digg Reader; what should we do now? by Bryan Alexander (Bryan Alexander)
Over to you, dear readers. Which way forward for RSS, both in the big picture and in the practical sense of which reader to try?
I am using Inoreader and love the ability subscribe to a feed. I therefore store my OPML on my site. This allows me to add and delete feeds, as well as maintain a permanent backup. The only catch I have found is that the feed does not seem to auto-refresh, so if you delete a link from your blog and therfore your OPML, then you need to remove it from Inoreader too.

I am keeping an eye on Aaron Parecki’s #Indieweb Reader too.

Bookmarked 10 definitions of datafication (in education) by Ben Williamson (code acts in education)
In simple terms, datafication can be said to refer to ways of seeing, understanding and engaging with the world through digital data. This definition draws attention to how data makes things visible, knowable, and explainable, and thus amenable to some form of action or intervention. However, to be a bit more specific, there are at least ten ways of defining datafication.
Ben Williamson documents ten ways of defining ‘datafication’:

  • Historically
  • Technically
  • Epistemologically
  • Ontologically
  • Socially
  • Politically
  • Culturally
  • Imaginatively
  • Dystopically
  • Legally & ethically

This is a good introduction to his book Big Data in Education.

Bookmarked Thirteen and Insta-famous: How Aussie tweens are 'brand-managing' themselves (ABC News)
You definitely do need to have two accounts, says Meika Woolard, a 13-year-old with 335,000 Instagram followers. She is one of Australia's most prominent teen Insta-influencers, and part of a growing trend of users harnessing the power of multiple accounts.
Uses of social media like this has me thinking about the way that IndieWeb and Domain of One’s Own centralise identities. Is this something unique to social media? Is this a limit of the ‘Rel=me’ approach?
Liked Open Letter to School District 61 on the use of Google Apps For Education (GAFE) – Brad Payne by Brad (
Parental consent, while legally sufficient, is an insufficient mechanism to protect the privacy of children and the confidentiality of student records because: It assumes parents have adequate digital literacy to make informed choices about their children’s privacy. It assumes school district immunity despite obligations under Section 79.1.b of the B.C. School Act. It assumes Google has incentive to adequately inform parents about the risks of data retention, profiling and automated decision making. It assumes computational statistical inferences derived from machine learning algorithms doesn’t threaten the privacy of children. I offer five recommendations: Strengthen the conditions for consent to be given. Expand the definition of digital literacy and offer learning opportunities for parents and teachers. Make it as easy to withdraw consent as it is to give consent. Create meaningful alternatives for students of parents who opt out. Phase out and discontinue use of GAFE in the classroom.
This is an interesting read from Brad Payne. It comes back to Douglas Rushkoff’s argument that social media should never be used in schools. It has me thinking about the ways that data associated with private Facebook groups could be scraped surreptitiously.
Listened An Indieweb Podcast Episode 0 by David ShanskeDavid Shanske from David Shanske
This is a test episode of An Indieweb Podcast(working title). In it, Chris Aldrich and I talk about a variety of Indieweb topics, with the theme of Considering the User, inspired by an article we were reading.

I really enjoyed this David and Chris. It was a wonderful insight into the #IndieWeb community. A couple of take-aways:

  1. The possibilities associated with Post-Kinds. I am wondering if instead of creating additional tags and categories that I need to craft my own kinds to differentiate between podcasts and music.
  2. I feel that the future lies in the community. I concur with Chris that I do not think that my place is coding the future. Instead I think that my contribution is in testing and trialing different additions. A point that I made in response to Eli Mellen.

If theis were to become a semi-regular occurance, it would be good to have a basic summary of discussions, as well as links to support further investigations.

Oh, and in regards to ‘impact’ (something that we love in the education world), it encouraged me to add GitHub to Bridgy. Thank you for the support and community as always.

Listened Little Man in my Head EP – Cheeky Chalk from
I am fascinated by the influence of space. It can be considered as a non-actor, an influence without agency. I often stop and listen to buskers with my daughters when we go into the city. In this circumstance, what is the influence of the open street on the music being played? This is something David Byrne touches upon in his TEDTalk:

This weekend we happened to stumble upon a performance from Cheeky Chalk.

Cheeky Chalk are a two piece, with Mark Chapman on vocals and Mitch Hudson on guitar. Their sound is a cross between folk, reggae and rock. Their EP Little Man in my Head is a mixture of stripped back tunes and full band treatments. What stood out was the sameness to it all. Even with the variance in instrumentation, the songs seemed the same. A good ‘same’, but same none the less.

I was left wonder whether this ‘sameness’ was in fact a product of the space? Even when Chapman sings about lose it is still optimistic. In contrast, when I think of lose and breaking up, I think of The Cure’s “Apart”. This is a song whose lyrics and music drives a harrowing message. The thing is, maybe such messages don’t have a place on Bourke Street? The audience, the space, the dancing, the instruments.

It was ironic that when we stumbled upon the duo they were pumping out a cover of OutKast’s “Hey Yeah”, a song with all its subtle messages still always leaves you tapping your feet.

I would file Little Man in My Head somewhere between Jack Johnson and Pete Murray.

Liked Networks: An Engine For Scaling Learning And Innovation (Part 3) by David Culberhouse (DCulberhouse)
It will benefit today’s leaders and organizations to spend time investing in and learning how networks can better serve our individuals and organizations for scaling the level of learning and knowledge that is necessary to stay vital and relevant in a world of accelerated and often turbulent change.