Replied to Freshly Brewed Thoughts: August 17, 2018 by Laura Hilliger (mailchi.mp)
Apparently, no one can remember the word “zythepsary”, nor can they spell it. I’ve thought about setting up a new one, but really, I don’t want to go through the trouble. What do you think? Should I set up something @ laurahilliger.com since that’s my domain probably forever? Or should I keep Zythepsary forever too because there’s hilarious hidden old things on it like this.
I sometimes think that maybe if I wasn’t so arcane, didn’t have such a weird username or had better Google juice – I can’t believe how many Aaron Davis’ there are and they all seem so much more exciting than me – then maybe I too might have more subscribers etc Then I remember that first and foremost my newsletter is for me.
Replied to
What frustrates me the most with Compass emails is that instead of just giving you the information, they tell you there is information, but then require you to login to find out what it is. Why? Analytics? Scraping data?
Bookmarked “Google Was Not a Normal Place”: Brin, Page, and Mayer on the Accidental Birth of the Company that Changed Everything by Adam Fisher (The Hive)
A behind-the-scenes account of the most important company on the Internet, from grad-school all-nighters, space tethers, and Burning Man to the “eigenvector of a matrix,” humongous wealth, and extraordinary power.
I really didn’t know how to read this attempt at some sort of truth from those who were there.

This oral history, gathered from a mix of original reporting and previously published and unpublished reflections, is an excerpt from Valley of Genius: The Uncensored History of Silicon Valley (as Told by the Hackers, Founders, and Freaks Who Made It Boom), published by Twelve.

Is it meant to discredit Google as just another misogynistic Silicon Valley startup? Why now? Are there any biases at play as there was with Quinn Norton’s doppelganger. I am reminded of Faulkner’s quote:

The past is never dead. It’s not even past.

Bookmarked Google tracks your movements, like it or not by Ryan Nakashima (Associated Press)
An Associated Press investigation found that many Google services on Android devices and iPhones store your location data even if you've used a privacy setting that says it will prevent Google from doing so.
In this expose, Associated Press uncover some of the different ways Google surreptitiously tracks users and how difficult it is to get out of. I remember reading Dylan Curran’s breakdown of the data Google have on us thinking that there is surely more. Clearly there is. This reminds me of Facebook’s shadow profiles. What intrigues me with all this is how the data is then analysed and used. That is the ledger right?

via Ian O’Byrne

Replied to Too Long; Didn’t Read #161 (W. Ian O'Byrne)
This raises broader questions about hate speech, freedom of speech, and rights online. I hinted at some of the questions I’ve been having about this topic several months ago in TL;DR. Should there be a “terms of service” for freedom of speech? Also, should we require that tech companies be the ones to dictate and enforce these freedoms. I’m still not sure.
Ian, this is such a challenging situation. People like Quinn Norton argue for engagement, while others argue that bigotry should be banned. I think that my initial response is to ban the liars and bigots, but the conundrum that was pointed out to me recently is that if you deny the voice of a particular few they will most likely find their own space somewhere else.

I found this podcast on ‘free speech’ intriguing:

It is always more complicated than we want it to be I guess.

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The news of your closure for six months came as a shock. There is something about habit and the familiar. Each morning I am greeted by your neon sign – rain, hail or shine. I am going to have to find a new path to tread, but I will return.
Liked HEWN, No. 279 by Audrey Watters (TinyLetter)
I am so fed up with Twitter. I have been for years now, no doubt. But it’s hard, as a self-employed writer, to ditch the site altogether. I use it to promote my work. (I’ll post a link to this newsletter there as soon as I hit “publish.”) And I find news and other writers’ stories there too – things that I wouldn’t necessarily stumble upon, thanks in no small part to the demise of RSS. Nevertheless, due to changes this week to Twitter’s API – changes that mean my desktop Twitter client of choice, Tweetbot, no longer really works – it is unlikely I’ll be on the site much for the foreseeable future.
Replied to Syndicating to Twitter, Micro.blog by Kicks CondorKicks Condor (kickscondor.com)
I think one syndication service I’d like to see is one where I could syndicate to an e-mail digest that people could sign up to get weekly or monthly.
I really like the idea of a regular summary. One of my itches is to make an archive page that would provide a summary of all my activities for a selected month.

I could build it with Google Sheets, I should probably start there.