Bookmarked Your ABC: Value, Investment and Return for the Community (Future of Your ABC)
Why the ABC and public broadcasting is vital to the community. Transcript of ABC managing director Michelle Guthrie’s speech at the Melbourne Press Club, Tuesday 19 June, 2018.
In response to the recent call to sell the ABC, Michelle Guthrie presents a speech explaining the value of the Australian Broadcasting Commission in today’s world. I must be honest, I don’t listen to the ABC as much as I used to, however I follow a number of podcasts, such as RN Future Tense, and often turn to their website as a first port of call for news. In a time when there is a lot of discussion about the ownership of core infrastructure, it seems strange to sell the ABC. I wonder if this is a reflection of the changes to the media landscape that my nostalgia is overlooking?
Bookmarked A Learning Lexicon- Issue 87 - Dialogic Learning Weekly  by Tom Barrett (Dialogic Learning Weekly)
I know from experience that one of the key strategies for shaping cultural change is sharing a common language. Habitual language use is one of the simplest, cheapest and most repeatable steps we can take on our journey.
When Gonski 2.0 discusses professional learning, I feel that this is one area where more time could be spent, regularly. This is one of the things I liked about Richard Olsen’s concept of the Modern Learning Canvas:


“Modern Learning Canvas – Instructional Model” by mrkrndvs is licensed under CC BY-SA

Bookmarked How Informal Learning Gets Misunderstood (And Misinterpreted) by David Price (Noteworthy - The Journal Blog)
The inconvenient truth is that students don’t need ‘experts’ the way they used to. Knowledge is ubiquitous. Any teacher that thinks that they don’t need to change as a result of this truth is doing their students a disservice. Make no mistake: the real learning revolution has already happened, it just doesn’t involve those of us who teach. Because they real revolution is in the phenomenal growth in informal and social learning — as practised by the Beatles and, now, all of us.
David Price responds to criticism that creativity is dependant on a cache of knowledge. Referring to his experiences with Musical Futures, Price explains that it is creativity and passion which lead to an interest in knowledge and theory, not vice versa. Something he also discusses in his book Open. This reminds me of a post from Amy Burvall who also discusses the importance of having dots to construct ideas. Interestingly, Brian Eno suggests that such ‘dots’ can grow out of shit. Reflecting on the growing trend to ban devices, Mal Lee and Roger Broadie suggest that banning will have no impact on students digital learning and will instead have a detrimental effect on agency within schools.
The Tyranny of Metrics; and the Dark Web
http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/the-tyranny-of-metrics-and-the-dark-web/9831438
In the first half of this episode of Future Tense, Antony Funnell speaks with Dr Jerry Muller about his book The Tyranny of Metrics. The conversation provides a useful provocation when it comes to metrics and measurements. It is interesting listening to this alongaide Alfie Kohn’s book Punished by Reward and Cathy O’Neill’s Weapons of Math Destruction.

The second part of the episode addresses the Dark Web.

Replied to 📑 Highlight of “Interviewing my digital domains” by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (BoffoSocko)
Typically a highlight wouldn’t include a textual note (like this), otherwise it would be considered marginalia or a general annotation. Perhaps I’ll get around to adding an annotation type shortly as well.
In regards to post kinds, how is a highlight different from a quote?
Watched

Beautiful things grow out of shit. Nobody ever believes that. Everyone thinks that Beethoven had his string quartets completely in his head—they somehow appeared there and formed in his head—and all he had to do was write them down and they would be manifest to the world. But what I think is so interesting, and would really be a lesson that everybody should learn, is that things come out of nothing. Things evolve out of nothing. You know, the tiniest seed in the right situation turns into the most beautiful forest. And then the most promising seed in the wrong situation turns into nothing. I think this would be important for people to understand, because it gives people confidence in their own lives to know that’s how things work.

If you walk around with the idea that there are some people who are so gifted—they have these wonderful things in their head but and you’re not one of them, you’re just sort of a normal person, you could never do anything like that—then you live a different kind of life. You could have another kind of life where you could say, well, I know that things come from nothing very much, start from unpromising beginnings, and I’m an unpromising beginning, and I could start something.

via Austin Kleon

Replied to Recalibrate with Old Books (A Point of Contact)
One of the better books I’ve read in the past few years is Being Digital, a 1996 book about the digital age. It was informative because of the amount of information about basic digital infrastructures is presented so clearly. It was also fascinating to read an account of the digital state of of the world in 1996.
Glen, you might be interested in Mal Lee and Roger Broadie’s reflection on Being Digital. I probably should read the book, especially based on your point of simplifying the message.