Replied to |k| clippings: 2019-04-14 — baby was a star (Twitter)
A story that truly deserves the adjective “extraordinary” in many ways: who the book collector was, the volume and variety he collected, that he read and summarized the books…and that some of that index survived. → ‘Extraordinary’ 500-year-old library catalogue reveals books lost to time Thanks, Reader K! ※ Linked within that story is another worth reading: How Christopher Columbus’s son built ‘the world’s first search engine’
This makes me wonder about the fragility of archiving, especially after reading Damon Krukowski’s recent reflections associated with MySpace. What happens when someone finds something like a zipdisk in 500 years time? Let alone in 50 years time.
Replied to |k| clippings: 2018-11-26 — it helps to press send by an author (Katexic Clippings)
A conversation last night reminded me that I am unrepentant about (most of) my 80s rock listening…then and now. Michelle Kwan’s cover of “Sweet Child o’Mine” on a guzheng nails not just the iconic song, but one of the era’s best solos. Also: a worthy cover by bluegrass musicians Thunder and Rain & Postmodern Jukebox doin’ it New Orleans style & Scary Pockets makin’ it funky & a wistful version by Taken by Trees.
Thank you for sharing the different covers. It is an intriguing collection.

Where jazz has its standards, it feels that the (post)modern standards are songs we have ingrained in our memory to a point where we apprehend every bend and squeal, even if it is not performed.

It is interesting to think of these songs in association with algorithms and the choice of what is played and performed. Has nostalgia replaced originality or is all music copied as people like Chilly Gonzales demonstrate.

Here I am again reminded of a comment from William Gibson:

Replied to |k| clippings: 2018-11-11 — 11/11 at 100 by an author (Katexic Clippings)
Abandoned? Post-apocalyptic? Or not…the Chongqing Metro Station in the Middle of Nowhere.
When I saw the image of subway entry seemingly in the middle of nowhere I thought it must be some sort of joke. However, I soon uncovered a different world. One involving rapid development:

Development of transport in China

The speed at which all this is happening in China makes me wonder why we speak about ten year plans in Melbourne, Australia.

In part this scenario of a station in a field reminds me of the discussion of the development of infrastructure before people in Stockholm:

In contrast, places like Vällingby, a Swedish suburb outside Stockholm built in the 1950s, were sited around a new Metro station. Building rail infrastructure through built-up areas is extremely expensive, but building it through farmland, before new neighborhoods are built, is comparatively cheap.

Replied to |k| clippings: 2018-10-21 — the heart nose by an author
I’m not surprised by the top three. Are you? → Exclusive: Data Reveals … The Books We Most Often Try To Read But Secretly Give Up On
Interested in the mention of Pride and Prejudice. I remember avoiding Austen for much of my Bachelor of Arts, until I came to my senses and took a class with John Wiltshire which involved reading all her novels.

I feel that their is a bit of myth and (mis)judgement around Austen’s work. One of the best things I did, although I would rather reread Mansfield Park or Emma than Pride and Prejudice.

On another text, I started reading Game of Thrones. Then I watched the show and gave up going back.

Replied to |k| clippings: 2018-09-30 — all in the noodle (TinyLetter)
Today is International Podcast Day, celebrating the power of this powerful, still under-appreciated media art form. For some solid recommendations, check out these lists: Bryan Alexander: Listening to in 2018 && WIRED: 27 of the best podcasts for curious minds in 2018 && Esquire: The 15 Best Podcasts of 2018 (So Far) && Vulture: Best Podcasts of 2018 (So Far). I’d love to hear what you are listening to.
I recently shared my podcast habits when Doug Belshaw shared his OPML file. The podcast that I think many overlook, but is worth a listen, is ABC Future Tense. It always has diverse topics incorporating a wide range of voices.