Listened BBC Radio 1 - Radio 1's Essential Mix, The Avalanches from BBC

The Avalanches take control of the Essential Mix decks.

This is a fantastic mix. I got lost in the range of genres. I found myself tapping away without realising. There is something unique about The Avalanches.

Tracklist:
Emahoy Tsegué & Maryam Guèbrou – The Jordan River Song
Unknown – Hello
Dion McGregor – Snowflakes
Dion McGregor – Midget City
Ratatat – Black Heroes
Wild Man Fischer – The Leaves Are Falling
Sun Ra – Enlightenment
Nancy Dupree – James Brown
The Joubert Singers – Stand On The Word
Cindy & The Playmates – Now That School Is Through
Grateful Dead – Shakedown Street
Edan The Humble Magnificent – Fumbling Over Words That Rhyme
Nina Simone – Ain’t Got No, I Got Life (Live)
Betty Everett – 1900 Yesterday
Moondog – Fog On The Hudson (425 W 57th Street)
Wild Man Fischer – Wild Man On The Strip Again
The Temple City Kazoo Orchestra – Stayin’ Alive
Krak Attack CX Kidtronik & Tchaka Diallo – Fame Rapp
Moondog – Up Broadway
The Parliaments – What You Been Growing
Paul McCartney & Linda McCartney – Monkberry Moon Delight
Africa – Light My Fire
Clarence Reid – Miss Hot Stuff
Edan The Humble Magnificent – Funky Voltron (feat. Insight)
Stark Reality Discovers Hoagy Carmichael’s Music Shop – Dreams
Madlib – Rock Konducta Vol 1
Unknown – The Snake
Ohio Penitentiary 511 Jazz Ensemble – Psych City
Blair – Life
Nancy Dupree – What Do I Have
Donald Byrd And The Blackbirds – Jazz Alphabet (Live)
Play Along At Home Rhythm Band – Pease Porridge Hot
Dick Rosmini & Hello People – Experiments (Teac Home Recording)
The Broads – Sing Sing Sing
Shooby Taylor – The Human Horn
Don Armando’s 2nd Ave. Rhumba Band – I’m An Indian Too
The John Cacavas Golden Space Orchestra – Hydrogen and Helium
Bruce Haack – Lie Back
Bruce Haack – Sing
Frank Zappa – Oh No
Hermeto Pascoal – Som da Barba (Music From the Beard) (Live)
Blair – Virgo Princess
William Onyeabor – Better Change Your Mind
Thurston Moore & Lee Ranaldo – The Year Punk Broke
Thurston Moore – Thurston @ 13
Jack Fascinato – Music From A Surplus Store
Clara Mondshine – Die Drachentrommler (Dragon Drummers)
Frank Zappa – Excentrifugal Forz
Bruce Haack – Rubberbands
The Stooges – L.A. Blues
Bad Brains – Big Take Over
J-Jems – Dance
Bruce Haack – Motorcycle Ride
Chandra – Kate
Tony Schwartz – Music In The Streets
Ata Kak – Daa Nyinaa
Yoko Ono – Walking On Thin Ice
The Slits – I Heard It Through The Grapevine
William Onyeabor – Let’s Fall In Love
Black Dice – Glazin’
Univ. of Ghana Postal Works – Cancelling Stamps At The University Of Ghana Post Office
Joe Moks – Boys And Girls
The Pointer Sisters – Don’t It Drive You Crazy
David Essex – Rock On
Paul McCartney – Check My Machine
Jimmy Van M & Richard Hieronymous – I Weigh With Kilos
Hanny Nahmias – Hanna’s Sabbath Dress
Sinkane – How We Be
Mort Garson – The Wozard of Iz
Uriah Heep – Wake Up
Black Milk – Wake Up
Mort Garson – Prologue
Frank Zappa – Mom and Dad
The Zombies – Hung Up On A Dream
Tony Schwartz – Music In The Streets

via Kicks Condor

Listened

Playing at the iconic Melba Spiegeltent in Melbourne, Missy will be joined on stage by some very special musical friends – Kasey Chambers, Dan Sultan, Gretta Ray, Ben Abraham and Peter Garrett.

0:55 All For Believing 4:08 Ten Days 9:08 Where I Stood 13:49 Going North (ft. Kasey Chambers) 20:16 Peachy 22:53 Arrows 28:11 Run So Fast (ft. Ben Abraham) 34:34 Oh Canada 39:03 Everyone’s Waiting 44:27 Futon Couch 48:50 Biggest Disappointment (ft. Dan Sultan) 54:34 The Special Two 59:20 Back To The Wall (ft. Peter Garrett) 1:04:43 49 Candles 1:08:27 Unashamed Desire 1:12:07 Warm Whispers 1:18:06 Steer (ft. Gretta Ray) 1:22:16 Scar

When I saw that Missy Higgins had a ‘greatest hits’ album I was a bit unsure. I was unsure how many songs she had. Yet I was shocked at how many of the tracks I knew, but had fogotten about. The concert is a great celebration of her time fifteen plus years.

Watched Sydney's New Year's Eve 2018
The Night is Yours concert included performances from Tim Minchin, Christine Anu, Ross Wilson, Ben Folds, Daryl Braithwaite, Casey Donovan, Isabella Manfredi of The Preatures, Client Liaison, Baker Boy, Kaiit, G Flip and Kimbra. What was really interesting was to hear artists cover the classics.

This is one of the reasons why the funding of the ABC is so important, with the only ad of mention being the spoof around Hottest One Hundred voting:

https://youtu.be/WCA87UHqd1c

Bookmarked Why is Paul Dempsey so good at playing covers? (Double J)

But what makes Dempsey's way with a cover so good?

Firstly, his understanding of what makes a song tick; he's the brains behind one of the most underrated songbooks in Australia, after all. Both as a solo artist and fronting Something For Kate, he's written music that's affecting, anthemic, and deceptively complex yet affably accessible. It's given him the toolset required to efficiently analyse and reproduce the ins-and-outs of songwriting.

Secondly, and more simply: that voice. Coming up with SFK during the late ‘90s landscape of post-grunge and emo, his singing ploughed with the emotional intensity and urgency of both scenes. His pipes have also proven to age like a fine wine, the gruffer edge of his grain now benefiting from a more refined and flexible falsetto. Just compare the larynx-busting yearning of ‘Captain' to the quiet resolve and dynamics of ‘Idiot Oracle'.

This post from Double J discusses Paul Dempsey’s perchance for covers.
Bookmarked The Invisible Hit Parade: How Unofficial Recordings Have Flowered in the 21st Century by Jesse Jarnow (WIRED)
Live-music tapers, data archivists, and media technologists are creating an authentic musical underground in a freemium world, a hideout where listening habits go unmonitored and unmonetized.
Jesse Jarnow explores the world of live recordings. He touches on the technology, habits and the role of the Grateful Dead. I remember growing up with Nirvana bootlegs bought at market stalls. It is interesting what this means in the digital age.

Marginalia

Tonight, Pier-Hocking is running a pair of MBHO KA100DK omnidirectional microphone capsules (via a 603A capsule attachment) into “a home-brewed” PFA phantom power adapter by way of a set of newfangled “active” cables, wired up by a colleague on a web forum for live-performance recording aficionados. (Most still refer to them as tapers.) Along with a feed from the venue’s soundboard, the microphone signal runs into Sound Devices MixPre-6, a digital multi-track recorder.

Sanctioning an official section in the audience for tapers in 1984, the Grateful Dead became known as the most taper-friendly band in the world. By then, Deadheads were already modding microphones, building their own preamps, experimenting with DATs, publishing phone book-length tape catalogs, and exploring internet-based distribution networks. More than anybody else, it was Deadheads who built the infrastructure on which the modern taping world operates. And, perhaps, it was the Grateful Dead’s enormous and resolutely nontraditional success—and critical rediscovery in the early 21st century—that provided one tipping point for taping’s new acceptance.

Others see the future of taping as going legit. Frank Zappa infamously re-bootlegged the bootleggers, and Pearl Jam has been releasing every show on CD since 2000. More recently, sites like Bandcamp have also allowed artists the flexibility to post live sets for sale as they see fit, as electronic artist Four Tet did this fall. For the past several years, Cafe Oto, the renowned London venue for jazz and experimental music, has sold selected live sets as part of its Otoroku series. Others have used live-streaming as a promotional tool, from bar bands with selfie-stick-mounted iPhones to global stars.

Listened DJ Shadow Talks with Clams Casino for the Talkhouse Music Podcast from Talkhouse
Representing two generations of game-changing hip hop production technique, DJ Shadow and Clams Casino recently caught up in New York City to tape an episode of the Talkhouse Music Podcast. They discussed their new records, Shadow’s Endtroducing..... remake, the ways that recording and sampling have changed over the years, and how it’s sometimes worth giving a great MC (like A$AP Rocky) a beat you were saving for your own record.
This conversation between DJ Shadow and Clams Casino provides an insight into the creation of electronic music. Both artists discuss hearing new possibilities in samples that then seed new tracks, as well as the evolution of technology used to produce and perform. One thing that really stood out was that being a ‘DJ’ is so much more than spinning discs, especially in an era when clearance is needed for each and every sample. I remember spending hours pressing the hold button on my Roland GR-700 and manipulating the sound on the Roland PG-200. Sadly, my tape recordings have log bitten the dust or else I could cut them up as Clams Casino discusses. I was also reminded of DJ Shadow’s analysis of Mutual Slump on the Song Exploder Podcast and the way the track was built around Bjork’s Possibly Maybe.
Watched Tribute Acts: Harmless Fun or Musical Scourge by an author from Pitchfork Videos
It’s a music business truth that the past is never dead. From ABBA The Concert to Dread Zeppelin, cover bands and tribute acts reunite the broken up, and reenact the great performances of yesteryear again and again with uncanny fidelity. Are these bands just good, clean fun, or are they the eager to please equivalent of junk television?
Replied to |k| clippings: 2018-11-26 — it helps to press send by an author (Katexic Clippings)
A conversation last night reminded me that I am unrepentant about (most of) my 80s rock listening…then and now. Michelle Kwan’s cover of “Sweet Child o’Mine” on a guzheng nails not just the iconic song, but one of the era’s best solos. Also: a worthy cover by bluegrass musicians Thunder and Rain & Postmodern Jukebox doin’ it New Orleans style & Scary Pockets makin’ it funky & a wistful version by Taken by Trees.
Thank you for sharing the different covers. It is an intriguing collection.

Where jazz has its standards, it feels that the (post)modern standards are songs we have ingrained in our memory to a point where we apprehend every bend and squeal, even if it is not performed.

It is interesting to think of these songs in association with algorithms and the choice of what is played and performed. Has nostalgia replaced originality or is all music copied as people like Chilly Gonzales demonstrate.

Here I am again reminded of a comment from William Gibson:

Listened Strange Little Girls - Wikipedia by an author from Wikipedia
Strange Little Girls is a concept album released by singer-songwriter Tori Amos in 2001. The album's 12 tracks are covers of songs written and originally performed by men, reinterpreted by Amos from a female's point of view. Amos created female personae for each track (one song featured twins) and was photographed as each, with makeup done by Kevyn Aucoin. In the United States the album was issued with four alternative covers depicting Amos as the characters singing "Happiness Is a Warm Gun", "Strange Little Girl", "Time," and "Raining Blood". A fifth cover of the "I Don't Like Mondays" character was also issued in the UK and other territories. Text accompanying the photos and songs was written by novelist Neil Gaiman. The complete short stories in which this text appears can be found in Gaiman's 2006 collection Fragile Things.
These reimaginings by Tori Amos are somewhat uncanny. Unlike other covers, such as Mark Ronson’s Just, where there is a respect to the original structure and sound, Amos reimagines just about every facet of the songs in question. It is easy to listen to many of these tracks and not necessarily recognise the original track.
Listened Review: Muse Get Lost in the Eighties on ‘Simulation Theory’ by an author from Rolling Stone
There are some pretty creative uses of their electronic obsessions, however, and that’s reliably becoming one of Muse’s more interesting moves. Though maybe too close to at least two different George Michael songs, “Dig Down,” has a very cool, wubbing, minimal feel and a bravado mix of poptronic pulse and theatrical bombast. And despite its completely ridiculous lyrics and Rush “Roll the Bones” rap vocal effects, “Propaganda” is a excellently weird song: think Prince getting a Swizz Beatz makeover with a steel guitar solo. Basically, where Muse, one of our last huge rock bands, is at their best and smartest is when they’re not being a rock band at all.
I love the idea of Muse taking on the eighties, but something just does not seem to click. It is interesting that they engaged with the likes of Timbaland, but musically and thematically it is a little confusing. I think Christopher Weingarten captures this best:

Most of Simulation Theory could be about our surveillance state and/or a relationship. The blurring results in clunkiness.

I am sure that live it would be a stadium spectacular, as it has many of the usual licks and baselines, but as an album it was short of what I hoped for.


On the flipside, I was really intrigued by the ‘alternative reality’ versions of a few of the songs. Along with Snow Patrol, Kimbra and St. Vincent, this seems to be becoming something of a trend? I wonder if this is a part of the move to digital consumption, therefore providing more opportunities for different takes?