📑 The mindfulness conspiracy

Bookmarked The mindfulness conspiracy (the Guardian)

It is sold as a force that can help us cope with the ravages of capitalism, but with its inward focus, mindful meditation may be the enemy of activism

In this extract from McMindfulness, Ronald Purser argues that paying closer attention on the present is not revolutionary, but rather magical thinking on steroids. Stripped of spirituality and ethics, mindfulness is nothing more than concentration training. Sadly, it becomes something another commodity to market to people, with little done to resolve the underlying conditions. This reminds me of a point made by Audrey Watters about the problem with blaming people for social media addiction.

Marginalia

Anything that offers success in our unjust society without trying to change it is not revolutionary – it just helps people cope. In fact, it could also be making things worse. Instead of encouraging radical action, mindfulness says the causes of suffering are disproportionately inside us, not in the political and economic frameworks that shape how we live. And yet mindfulness zealots believe that paying closer attention to the present moment without passing judgment has the revolutionary power to transform the whole world. It’s magical thinking on steroids.

The problem is the product they’re selling, and how it’s been packaged. Mindfulness is nothing more than basic concentration training. Although derived from Buddhism, it’s been stripped of the teachings on ethics that accompanied it, as well as the liberating aim of dissolving attachment to a false sense of self while enacting compassion for all other beings.

What remains is a tool of self-discipline, disguised as self-help.

People are expected to adapt to what this model demands of them. Stress has been pathologised and privatised, and the burden of managing it outsourced to individuals.

By failing to address collective suffering, and systemic change that might remove it, they rob mindfulness of its real revolutionary potential, reducing it to something banal that keeps people focused on themselves.

Rather than discussing how attention is monetised and manipulated by corporations such as Google, Facebook, Twitter and Apple, they locate the crisis in our minds. It is not the nature of the capitalist system that is inherently problematic; rather, it is the failure of individuals to be mindful and resilient in a precarious and uncertain economy. Then they sell us solutions that make us contented, mindful capitalists.

Kabat-Zinn, a dedicated meditator, had a vision in the midst of a retreat: he could adapt Buddhist teachings and practices to help hospital patients deal with physical pain, stress and anxiety. His masterstroke was the branding of mindfulness as a secular spirituality.

A truly revolutionary mindfulness would challenge the western sense of entitlement to happiness irrespective of ethical conduct.

If mindfulness just helps people cope with the toxic conditions that make them stressed in the first place, then perhaps we could aim a bit higher. Should we celebrate the fact that this perversion is helping people to “auto-exploit” themselves? This is the core of the problem.

2 responses on “📑 The mindfulness conspiracy”

  1. Replied to bookmarked: The mindfulness conspiracy by Aaron Davis

    In this extract from McMindfulness, Ronald Purser argues that paying closer attention on the present is not revolutionary, but rather magical thinking on steroids. Stripped of spirituality and ethics, mindfulness is nothing more than concentration training.

    Thanks for this Aaron, a great read, with many great quotes, my fave:

    Perhaps the most straightforward definition of neoliberalism comes from the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, who calls it “a programme for destroying collective structures that may impede the pure market logic”.

    The whole thing might be harsh to mindfulness practitioners who are very socially engaged, but the parallels with environmental  problems and solutions is powerful.

    NB: Engaged Buddhism

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