๐Ÿ““ War on Ukraine

There is so much being written about Ukraine. Here is my attempt to keep a list of some of the interesting pieces.

In The Month That Changed a Century, Michael Hirsh discusses the way in which Putin has unsettled the political status-quo:

In little more than a month, Russian President Vladimir Putin has changed the course of this young and already troubled century. He has resurrected the threat of territorial conquest and nuclear war. He has jolted Western Europe awake from its long postwar torpor, raising the prospect of rapid German rearmament. He has put the capstone on two decades of U.S. misdirection by defying American power and influence.

Above all, with his invasion of Ukraine, Putin is trying to complete work on a vast project of destruction implicitly supported by several other world leaders, especially Chinese President Xi Jinping. Together, these leaders want to break what they see as U.S. hegemony over the international system and undermine the notion that the world is bound by a common set of values embodied in international law and upheld by institutions such as the United Nations.

Rutger Bregman explains why Europe needs Ukraine as a reminder of the hope that the EU actually offers.

Ukraine, in short, chose Europe. And Putin found that intolerable. Now it is up to us to choose Ukraine. Yes, normally the road to EU membership is long and complicated, and with good reason. But these are not normal times. Millions of brave Ukrainians have reinvigorated the European idealโ€”of freedom, democracy, and cooperationโ€”and many have paid with their lives.

Timothy Snyder explains how The War In Ukraine Is a Colonial War.

Ukrainians assert their nationโ€™s existence through simple acts of solidarity. They are not resisting Russia because of some absence or some difference, because they are not Russians or opposed to Russians. What is to be resisted is elemental: the threat of national extinction represented by Russian colonialism, a war of destruction expressly designed to resolve โ€œthe Ukrainian question.โ€ Ukrainians know that there is not a question to be answered, only a life to be lived and, if need be, to be risked. They resist because they know who they are.

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