📑 Using Picture Books With Older Students – A How-to Guide

Bookmarked Using Picture Books With Older Students – A How-to Guide by Pernille Ripp (Pernille Ripp)
Which book I choose to share depends on the lesson.  I treat it much like a short story in what I want students to get out of it so it has to suit the very purpose we are trying to understand. I introduce the concept by sharing a story and then I ask my students to come as close as they can to the rocking chair in our corner.  Once settled, whether on the floor, on balls or on chairs, I  read it aloud.  We stop and talk throughout as needed but not on every page, it should not take more than 10 minutes at most to get through an average size picture book.  If it is a brand new concept I may just have students listen, while other times they might engage in a turn-and-talk.   I have an easel right next to me and at times we write our thoughts on that.  Sometimes we make an anchor chart, it really just depends on the purpose of the lesson.  Often a picture book is used as one type of media on a topic and we can then branch into excerpts from text, video, or audio that relates to the topic.
Pernille Ripp provides a detailed guide into using picture books in any classroom. This includes choosing picture books, how she displays them, there place in supporting fluency and how they are used as introductory texts. This is all a part of knowing yourself as a reader. I too have used picture books in the past to support the teaching comprehension.

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