Liked ‘It’s a superpower’: how walking makes us healthier, happier and brainier (the Guardian)

Neuroscientist Shane O’Mara believes that plenty of regular walking unlocks the cognitive powers of the brain like nothing else. He explains why you should exchange your gym kit for a pair of comfy shoes and get strolling

Liked Thomas Bernhard on Walking, Thinking, and the Paradox of Self-Reflection (Brain Pickings)

However, we may not ask ourselves how we walk, for then we walk differently from the way we really walk and our walking simply cannot be judged, just as we may not ask ourselves how we think, for then we cannot judge how we think because it is no longer our thinking. Whereas, of course, we can observe someone else without his knowledge (or his being aware of it) and observe how he walks or thinks, that is, his walking and his thinking, we can never observe ourselves without our knowledge (or our being aware of it). If we observe ourselves, we are never observing ourselves but someone else. Thus we can never talk about self-observation, or when we talk about the fact that we observe ourselves we are talking as someone we never are when we are not observing ourselves, and thus when we observe ourselves we are never observing the person we intended to observe but someone else. The concept of self-observation and so, also, of self-description is thus false. – Thomas Bernhard

Bookmarked Doing my research work is like walking a city. How would you walk this city? by Dr. Naomi Barnes (EduResearch Matters)

If you were to walk to the top of the tallest tower and look down on the network of roads and people, it might look planned, straight, considered. Plenty of people have taken that path and many know where to go. You can tell by the structures. But when you get down to ground level, the steps people are taking are not all in unison. They wander, stop, turn around, bump into things.

Naomi Barnes reflects on walking around cities, irruptions and the way in which we shape our research and our research then shapes us. This was an interesting read in light of Ian Guest’s reflections on flânography and his description of riches.
Replied to Austin Kleon’s weekly newsletter: The means of resistance (mailchi.mp)

I really enjoyed Frederic Gros’s A Philosophy of Walking. It’s a sausagefest, though, so I might dip back into Rebecca Solnit’s Wanderlust: A History of Walking, or Keri Smith’s The Wander Society, or I might check out Lauren Elkin’s Flâneuse: Women Walk the City…

This is a great collection of books. Someone who made me think differently about walking was Will Self:

Worth a watch (or listen while walking).