Replied Chopping Ancestors from WordPress oEmbedded Tweets by Alan Levine (CogDogBlog)
After a few rounds of swinging the code axe, I am cautiously optimistic I have an answer. Be warned. What follows involves code modifications to your theme’s functions.php and for older posts, some clearing of stuff in your database. Now that there are maybe three readers left (Hi Tom!), here we go.
This is another great deep dive Alan. I have not quite got to the stage of carving things out in the backend, but have started down the road of a Child theme thanks to your help. I am interested in adding your solution at that level. It really bugs me how the default oEmbed bakes in the parent post.

P.S. Am I the third reader or a lucky forth?

Via collect.readwriterespond.com

Replied Groups, communities, collectives or …? by Ian Guest (Marginal Notes)
Twitter is classified by Stephen Downes as a Group, based on the fact that power is centralised and held by the platform, rather than being in the hands of the participants. Membership is closed by dint of the requirement to create an account and there are rules which members are obliged to follow. In addition to the criteria he uses to disti...
This is an interesting discussion Ian. I wonder if you have read Teaching Crowds by Jon Dron and Terry Anderson. I have summarised it here. However I think that this graphic captures it:

A representation of the ideas presented in Teaching Crowds
Graphic taken from a presentation at GAFE Summit, 2016

What intrigues me about labeling Twitter as a ‘group’ ignores the many features built into the platform and the affordances they allow. For example, the focus on hashtags allows for the formation of ‘Communities of Interest’, while lists can be used to develop ‘Circles’. Maybe Downes’ reference to ‘sameness’ is assocaited with the idea of ‘templated self’.

A self or identity that is produced through various participation architectures, the act of producing a virtual or digital representation of self by filling out a user interface with personal information.

It has definitely left me wondering.

Replied Storify Bites the Dust. If You Have WordPress, You Don’t Need Another Third Party Clown Service by Alan Levine (CogDogBlog)
There are two kinds of people or organizations that create things for the web. One is looking to make money or fame and cares not what happens once they get either (or none and go back to flipping burgers). The other has an understanding and care for the history and future of the web, and makes every effort to make archived content live on, to not leave trails of dead links. Storify is Type 1. After getting enough of a value based on the free labor of grunts like you and me who built content in it, they got bought by Adobe, and swept up into some enterprise product
Thank you Alan for your investigation into alternatives to Storify. By chance, I had gone down a similar rabbit hole wondering how I could store a set of Tweets. I was under the impression that being embedded if the original tweet were deleted then they would not show up in the blog. It was for this reason that I explored pasting the text. I am assuming from your discussion(s) that this is not the case?

I still like the idea of using TAGS to collect the links, but rather than pasting the text:

The book traces the changing focus of the history of second wave feminism over the 20th/21st centuries. Providing essays situated in each of the three ‘Acts’. I’m live tweeting Fraser’s overview of the history and spirit of the wave
“Second wave feminism came out of the New Left after WW2.

Act1 – Began life as an insurrectionary force that challenged male domination in state organised capitalist societies”

Act2 – the feminist imagination turned from redistribution of power/economy to recognition of difference – identity/cultural politics dominated

Act3 – still unfolding but we are seeing the reinvigoration of feminist and other emancipatory forces to demand that the runaway markets be subjected to democratic control

A user could just paste the URLs:

http://twitter.com/DrNomyn/statuses/940413626082455552
http://twitter.com/DrNomyn/statuses/940414094946873344
http://twitter.com/DrNomyn/statuses/940414496564166661
http://twitter.com/DrNomyn/statuses/940414918280429568

Will continue to think about this, especially as I do not always want the parent tweet necessarily embedded. I also have to investigate your Storify Embeddable Link Extractor, but it looks to be a great tool for all situations.

📓 Creating an Archive of a Set of Tweets

I really the way Naomi Barnes shares her readings and responses via Twitter. This is something that I have done in the past. For example, check my quotes associated with danah boyd’s book It’s Complicated. Beyond replying to the first tweet to create a connected stream of responses, I used a hashtag (#ItsComplicated in the case of boyd’s book) to organise the responses. This is a method often encouraged by authors / publishers more and more. See for example the use of #intentionthebook to collect responses associated with Amy Burvall and Dan Ryder’s book Intention.

Barnes has taken this a different way and developed a hashtag to collect all her readings (#NBNotes), but rather than tagging each subsequent post, this is just saved for the initial Tweet.

I really like Barnes’ intent to share. I just wonder if there is a means of owning these notes. Ideally, taking a POSSE approach, she might live blog and post this to Twitter. I vaguely remember Chris Aldrich sharing something about this recently, but the reference escapes me. This is also limited with her blog being located at WP.com. I therefore wondered about the option of pasting the content of the tweets into a blog as an archive.

Clearly, you can embed Tweets, often by adding the URL. However, there are more and more people deleting their Tweets and if you embed something that is deleted, this content is then lost. (Not sure where this leaves Storify etc.) Another approach is to use Martin Hawksey’s TAGS to create an archive and then use this data to paste into a post. I have documented the steps with gifs here. If each of the tweets included the unique hashtag, the archive could be created using this, however as it is not, the easiest way of capturing the tweets would be to search for ‘@DrNomyn’.

The problem then is that the archive includes all tweets. Although I could query this, it is easy enough to use the Filter option in the Data menu of Sheets to focus only on tweets from @DrNomyn (Column B) and to organise Tweets in chronological order (Column E). The quickest way to get these Tweets into a post is to highlight the cells in question and copy them.

Then just paste this text into the post. I would then add blockquotes, but this maybe a personal preference. I guess there are other things that could be done, such as adding blockquotes via the sheets and even removing links to the actual Tweets (if desired), but I think that this offers a start.


_I just realised that TAGS only captures 140 characters, not the extended length. I guess this solution may not work_ I realised that I needed to downloaded a new copy of TAGS. Here then is a copy of the tweets:

The current challenge to 2nd wave feminism is what to critique.
Which understanding of androcentrism?
Which interpretations of gender justice?
Which modes of feminist theorising should be incorporated into the current political imaginary?
Fraser urges feminist to ‘break that unholy alliance’ between feminism and marketisation and forge new ones between ’emancipation’ and ‘social protection’
The personal became political.
Boundaries of contestation became more than just the socio-economic
What happened in homes and was attached to bodies were thrust into the public sphere in order to politicise
The first issue the New Left focused on was the Vietnam War and the role capitalism was taking in supporting neo-colonialism to support the West.

Soon attention was turned to other core features of capitalism that had become ‘naturalised’
Materialism, consumerism, social control, sexual repression, sexism, heteronormativity were all normalised under capitalism.

Social activists began to organise to break through these normative political routines
Fraser argues that feminism can no longer ignore economic inequality if it wants to be taken seriously as a politically transformative force. Revive Act1 (redistribution) with the cultural insights of Act2 (recognition)
Act2 – the feminist imagination turned from redistribution of power/economy to recognition of difference – identity/cultural politics dominated
Feminism [and I’m going to add on the shoulders of the Civil/Indigenous Rights, LGBTIQ, and independence movements to which it should be eternally thankful] began questioning the exclusions of social democracy
Attention turned to the politics of recognition.
Unable to transformatively address the androcentrism of capitalism, feminists began targeting the harms capitalism caused in an effort to transform culture
Feminism must also integrate transnationalism into its agenda.
How might feminism foster equal participation transnationally across entrenched power asymmetries and divergent world views?
Feminism MUST be intersectional if it wants to address the inequalities of capitalism
The history of 2nd wave feminism:

Western Europe and North America saw unprecedented prosperity after WW2.

Keynesian economics showed how to incorporate the unions and built welfare states

Mass consumption had apparently tamed social conflict
But the ‘success’ of Keynesian economics ignored the exclusion from the labour market of women and people of colour.

The ‘Golden Age of Capitalism’ was shattered by the New Left – the radical youth who took to the streets
Fraser suggests that instead of synergy between redistributive and recognitive agendas, 2nd wave feminism developed a binary where people had to choose which side they thought worked best
Act3 – still unfolding but we are seeing the reinvigoration of feminist and other emancipatory forces to demand that the runaway markets be subjected to democratic control
Second wave feminism came out of the New Left after WW2.

Act1 – Began life as an insurrectionary force that challenged male domination in state organised capitalist societies
Neoconservative forces have (for a time) defused 2nd wave feminism’s radical currents but we are beginning to see it’s reanimation [Fraser predicted it in 2014, I reckon we can say it’s here in late 2017]
Fraser argues that, despite good intentions, the emphasis on identity dovetailed too neatly with neoliberal desires to make people forget about egalitarianism and redistribution of capital
At present 2nd wave feminism is deepening its signature insights
– critiquing capitalism’s androcentrism
– analysis of male domination
– gender -sensitive revisions of democracy and justice
By the 1980s the political project of feminism had died down due to decades of Conservative governments. The fall of the Communist bloc also didn’t help ‘socialist’ movements
The book traces the changing focus of the history of second wave feminism over the 20th/21st centuries. Providing essays situated in each of the three ‘Acts’. I’m live tweeting Fraser’s overview of the history and spirit of the wave

Replied
Simon, if your question is what would my research question be, I am intrigued by:

To be honest, these investigations are always ongoing. That is what I like about the idea of a Wikity blog.

If your point is about when am I going to do my Masters, I am not sure. Is it free? I think that if or when I do eventually dive in, it will probably be research-based, rather than solely course work.