Replied to Interviewing My Domain by Tom Woodward (bionicteaching.com)

Getting started is pretty easy. It’s like joining a gym. Easy to start, easy to go a time or two. It’s the long run that interests me. I think that’s driven by the desire to do something more than you can in other places. I’d spend some time thinking about what it is you want. Do you care about owning your data in a particular way? Do you want more than a paid wordpress.com account can offer?

You might start in those more restrictive environments (assuming you can migrate out with safety and ease) and then move up when you feel the box is too cramped. Making your moves after hitting the limits makes sense to me. If you’re very happy with a particular box then taking on the extra work, however minimal, when you don’t want the reward doesn’t make sense. Maybe that’s the deal. Take advantage of your freedom. Try many things. Make and destroy. Make again. Have fun with your freedom.

Tom, I really like your point about file structures and content. I am not sure I really thought about that side of things and only do so now that it is a problem. A part of me thinks that it would have been nice to know more, but then again, how could I. I only know what I (think I) know because of the mistakes I made.

My current mistake is having two sites, but wanting to share content across both (they are on the same server.) This was definitely not something that I would have considered when I created my first site on Blogger.

Replied to Uncanny EdTech (bavatuesdays)
Uncanny Learning
Although the zombie apocalypse did not occur in 2012 (as much as I am aware), many of these futures sadly seemingly are coming into fruition. From net neutrality to Web 2.0, many ‘promises’ have failed. One highlight was the mention of Wordle. The uncanny aspect is that it feels like a conversation that is needed today as much as ten years ago.
Bookmarked Social Media Jujutsu by Tom Woodward (bionicteaching.com)
Jujutsu is a martial art focused on using your opponent’s momentum against them– clever redirection of force rather than trying to meet it directly. This seems like it might be an option for some of today’s social media woes where people are trying to continue to take advantage of the good aspects of these tools/communities while opposing some of their attempts at manipulation. There are major alternatives like Mastodon but many people aren’t going to make that jump. So consider this post more of a way you might mitigate harm while continuing using tools meant to bend your mind and warp your perceptions.
Tom Woodward reflects on the stresses of social media and shares a number of tools for mitigating the harm. This includes add-ons which hides Twitter metrics and tools which adjust your language. He also touches on some strategies, such as commenting on sites more than social media. Depending on your platform, I would recommend the #IndieWeb and activating webmentions. Also, Micro.blog offers another entry point to claiming the web, especially in regards to RSS.


Also posted on IndieNews

Doug Belshaw on Twitter
Martin Hawksey used my remix of Tom Woodward’s post on API’s at OER18.

Hawksey has also shared this before at MozFest:

Bookmarked Clipping tools for HTML5 audio, HTML5 video, and YouTube by Jon Udell (jonudell.net)
Jon Udell has created a series of tools for creating URLs assocaited with fragments of media. You can read more about it on his blog.

Tom Woodward has also developed something similar for WordPress.

Replied to WordPress Timeline JS Plugin by Tom Woodward (bionicteaching.com)
Writing blogs posts is nice because it documents things and makes me notice all sorts of things I missed in the heat of trying to get a working plugin but it also sucks because it takes me forever to write the post. These asides are also the reason I have 223 draft posts on my site.
I am loving all your work at the moment Tom around visualisations. I am going to spin this plugin up and see how I go. In regards to ‘events’, how does this relate to the idea of.h-events? Is it the same?
Liked Screen Time by Tom Woodward (bionicteaching.com)
Screen time isn’t a single thing. It’s an insane range of things. There’s lots of screen time that is of Twinkie quality but there are many other options. If I read a book on a device is it screen time or is that reading? If I’m coding for an hour? Editing video? Video chat with my parents? When we reduce things to this extent we end up doing things that ignore the actual problem.