Bookmarked
James Bridle takes a dive into the algorithmic nightmares lurking within YouTube. This is taken from his book and elaborates on a post he wrote exploring the topic. He ends with an explanation that this is a problem that we all must grapple with:

The thing, though, I think most about these systems is that this isn’t, as I hope I’ve explained, really about YouTube. It’s about everything. These issues of accountability and agency, of opacity and complexity, of the violence and exploitation that inherently results from the concentration of power in a few hands — these are much, much larger issues. And they’re issues not just of YouTube and not just of technology in general, and they’re not even new. They’ve been with us for ages. But we finally built this system, this global system, the internet, that’s actually showing them to us in this extraordinary way, making them undeniable. Technology has this extraordinary capacity to both instantiate and continue all of our most extraordinary, often hidden desires and biases and encoding them into the world, but it also writes them down so that we can see them, so that we can’t pretend they don’t exist anymore. We need to stop thinking about technology as a solution to all of our problems, but think of it as a guide to what those problems actually are, so we can start thinking about them properly and start to address them.

Replied to
Amy, your presentation captures succinctly many of the dots you have collected and curated over time. It brings together so many posts that I have loved over the years, including:

  • There’s No Copyright for Cookies
  • What If We…Ditch “Best Practices”?
  • Just Make Stuff
  • Make Du Jour
  • Plus Ca Change
  • It is so easy to overlook the time and effort associated with something like this.