Replied to Singapore abolishes school exam rankings, says learning is not competition (Citi Newsroom)

For older students in primary schools and secondary schools, marks for each subject will be rounded off and presented as a whole number, without decimal points – to reduce the focus on academic scores. Parents will continue to receive information about their child’s progress in school during parent-teacher meetings.

Is this that different from Australia? I find that there is a lot of confusion about what schools do and are required to do when it comes to assessment and reporting. This is something discussed in Episode 139 of the TER Podcast.
Bookmarked Dear Report Cards, You Suck. – BlogMoore 2018 (blogmoore2018.com)

The grade game is a big thing. Throughout the year every teacher and student will play it. This year we changed the game, and we changed our classroom. I was able to get feedback all the time. I was able to use technology. I learned to self-assess. I had time to revise and check my work which made my writing better. Because I showed evidence of growth and learning, I became a B student.

Year 6 student, Lynton, reflects on the problems with report cards and the power of technology to transform learning. This is interesting reading, especially in light of the work being done by ACER around growth and the new Gonski review, which is pushing for a focus on growth.
Replied to The Last and Final Days of Report Cards – Looking Up (Looking Up)

“Video killed the radio star” but what will kill report cards? This is what you’ll see after a short ride into the future in the “Educational Delorean”:

Teachers and students use personal digital devices in the classroom. When learning happens it’s recorded on the device. This could be video (student does something), audio (student explains something), pictures, digital documents or written observations. Teachers and students tag the learning with the relevant expectations, add comments and save it on the server.
The student receives feedback from the teacher and others, reflects and reviews. When learning is ready to ‘publish’ it’s evaluated and added to the student’s portfolio.
The student’s digital portfolio is shared with parents and anyone else the student chooses. Automatic notifications are sent whenever something is added or parents can subscribe to a periodic digest. Parents or others add comments, ask questions, or just click “Like”.
When the reporting period ends the student and teacher select the best work for sharing, write reflections and curate the work. Parents add comments. Growth is easily seen because previous work is already in the portfolio.

With various changes in my position, my attention has turned to students reporting. This sent me back into my social bookmarking and I came across your post again Andrew.

Do you think that the conversation has moved much? I have written about ongoing report, however I worry about the schools that do both and the burnout that this may cause.